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  5. "Tuo rahka on herkullista."

"Tuo rahka on herkullista."

Translation:That quark is delicious.

July 19, 2020

10 Comments


[deactivated user]

    Tasty should also be accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hacu.

    Tasty (to me) is maybe a bit more like hyvää/ maistuvaa though - good, but not quite as good as herkullinen (which is not used all that often). But yeah, it could be accepted as well.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan646349

    to an American English speaker, "rahka" and "quark" are equally foreign words; it feels strange and unnatural to have to use the word "quark" in the translation instead of just saying "that rahka is delicious"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidHough15

    Well, I've seen quark in the store. No rahka, though.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pbrazina

    As a friend described it to me, think of quark as 'curds' or 'yogurt'. Perhaps not the EXACT same thing, it gives a materialistic form to what rahka is.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/miiapiironen

    The translation of 'rahka' is making me more confused.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jrubenp

    Why was it "tämä marja on herkulliNEN" but "tuo rahka on herkulliSTA"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pieni_chilipalko

    A berry (marja) is countable, so the most natural thing is to use the basic nominative form of the adjective, "herkullinen". "Rahka", on the other hand, is a mass noun, so the partitive (herkullista) is the better choice here.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JgVole

    I only recently found out that quark is a kind of cheese (like cottage cheese I think) before that I only knew the word from physics. I think few British residents will recognise quark.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidHough15

    The physics term comes ultimately from the cheese. When quarks were hypothesized it was known they come in threes. This made a physicist who happened to have read some of Finnegan's Wake recall a phrase from there, "three quarks for Muster Mark", and he suggested they be called quarks. James Joyce included "quark" in Finnegan's Wake because, I imagine, he thought it was an amusing word and confusable with "quart" -- Finnegan's Wake is all about wordplay and alcohol, which can come in quarts. Joyce was familiar with quark as the dairy product.

    I may not have all these details precisely right, but at least this rhymes with the truth.

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