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"In which hotel is Pöllö spending the night?"

Translation:Missä hotellissa Pöllö on yötä?

July 20, 2020

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarcinM85

Why not viettää yötä?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MCRmadness

That works otherwise, but for some reason 'viettää' makes 'yö' to either use the accusative case* or have a possessive suffix:

  • Missä hotellissa Pöllö viettää yön? = In which hotel is Pöllö spending the night?
  • Missä hotellissa Pöllö viettää yön? = In which hotel is Pöllö spending his night?

///Edit: *I said originally "genitive case" but I meant the accusative - they both just happen to have the same suffix, -n, which made me, a native Finn, mix these up :D Accusative can also have no ending so it looks like the nominative. Plurals and pronouns have -t.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarcinM85

But one says viettää aikaa, viettää lomaa. Is the accusative used when there is a specified amount of time?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MCRmadness

'Aika' and 'loma' can be unspecific periods times so they work the same as other uncountable nouns too -> they use partitive. 'Loma' can also used as specific amount of time. And I think you're correct about the accusative, it is bit rarer in Finnish because it's is used but it has the same suffix as genitive too (-n), but I think my first sentence was in accusative and not in genitive, so my apologies if I confused you with that. I will fix that to my earlier text. And to answer your question: yes, I think that is exactly what happens.

A fun fact: nouns with the possessive suffix actually look the same in singular and plural: 'yönsä' can be both 'his/her/their night' or 'his/her/their nights'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SIMON649717

Yöpyy? inf.: yöpyä.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lk_
  • 1973

That's totally fine. It would actually be my first choice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaiirapetjan

Is "Missä hotellissa Pöllö yöta on?" an acceptable alternative?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lk_
  • 1973

Technically it's correct, although it's yötä :) But the word order sounds poetic at least, and no native speaker would ever say that in a real life situation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanyloOwl

I am a bit confused by this setence. When I saw the Finnish, it reads to me as "In which hotel is Pollo at night".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lk_
  • 1973

You're almost correct, but there's a subtle difference. Olla yö (also yöpyä is the same in one word) means exactly that, "to spend a night", to sleep over the night at somewhere.

I'd say that "to be somewhere at night" would be olla yöllä [jossakin], i.e. Missä hotellissa Pöllö on yöllä would mean "in which hotel is Pöllö at night" – just being there in general, not sleeping or being a guest.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanyloOwl

So the partitive night combined with to be means to spend the night?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lk_
  • 1973

Exactly.


[deactivated user]

    Pääsee yöksi?


    [deactivated user]

      That would be more like you don't have a place to stay and you're admitted there. Consequently you can spend the night, but that is not the meaning of "päästä yöksi".

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