"voida"

Translation:may

July 22, 2020

32 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

I find this translation task a bit weird, as the verb may does not really have an infinitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpre53

Only English purists distinguish between "can" and "may" nowadays. In everyday usage "can" is much more prevalent


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha_Metsakallas

From the acclaimed translator Kersti Juva came out last year a book with the title Löytöretki suomeen (my trans.: A discovery expedition to Finnish), where she tells what choices she has made while translating from English to Finnish (see the linked Wikipedia article for her selected works). In that book she gives several examples how the English "can" has completely different meanings requiring different translations. I can imagine that neither "may" is unambiguous. So we end up having "cans", "mays" etc. on one side and voida, kyetä, pystyä (and several others) on the other side, and there is no one-to-one correspondence between those. For that reason this exercise void of any context is completely useless.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rickyjose.

Might be true for the ones who srive for acclaimed translator level. For me as a more modest learner it is not a completely useless one...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon486678

Well, may can be used as be used as a politeness form (as 'I would like' vs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zamlet

Is "voida" an issue of capability ("can") or of permission ("may")? Or can it take both meanings?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha_Metsakallas

Both, see my comment with a reference to Kersti Juva.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zamlet

Then either one should probably be accepted. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

...and they both are.


[deactivated user]

    Or to feel


    [deactivated user]

      Isn't voida to (be allowed)?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lk_
      • 1971

      In addition to "may" (e.g. May I? Voinko?) I understand voida to mean mostly "to be able to" (have the means to do sth by oneself; related to kyetä).

      Better and more comprehensively explained in Wiktionary


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha_Metsakallas

      Kyllä, it has several meanings depending on the context. I think you should report this question, because there is no context to hint what meaning is sought after.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

      To be able to is accepted (18 Aug 2020).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaVatan

      No it isn't 24th Aug 2020


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGreatUserName

      It is now, 9th Sept 2020 :-)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

      Weirdly, the options for this sentence haven't been changed for months. Which makes me think that sometimes typos play a role.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrBallon

      I think that voida is related to the danish word at vede ( which means to know in English )


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/redierb

      I don't think so, rather that it has to do with "voima", power.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zakapioooor

      Why not an infinitive form "to may" or "to can"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpre53

      Those infinitives don’t exist in English. “Can” and “may” exist only as auxiliary verbs that don’t conjugate. They’re the same in every person, singular and plural.

      To the extent that there’s a “to can” infinitive, it means preserving foods by putting them in cans, eg, “today I am going to can some tomatoes”.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha_Metsakallas

      So you can can cans :-)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zamlet

      Yes, you may. :)


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon486678

      Ah, but can those who can can-can


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon486678

      Ah, but can those who can can-can can cans? May be - can not, say.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon486678

      Ah, but can those who can can-can can cans? May be - can not, say.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Has405246

      It is wrong; If it means may it has to be with another verb. It has to be in an auxillary position to be 'may'


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nimporte-qui

      It has to be with another verb to mean "voida".

      If you want the translation to be an infinitive verb then to be able is the only option. However, this still needs to be paired with another verb in English or else it will mean "olla pystyvä". As for may/can being auxiliaries, it doesn't make much sense to require a grammatic equivalent when Finnish doesn't have one. So I would not say may/can are wrong exactly... but maybe this exercise is a little awkward.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BernardAda9

      If voida is an infinitive (which it is) the English translation must be 'to . . .' . There is no such verb as 'to may' in modern English, but like 'can', 'shall', 'will', 'must' etc. it is used with the infinitive minus 'to' of a verb to indicate modification of the meaning. In Old English 'to may' meant 'to have power, to be able', but in the modern language it has lost almost all conjugated forms. So – voida = to be able.


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sushituna

      May like the month or may like 'MAY i use the bathroom'?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpre53

      The month of May is toukokuu.

      Learn Finnish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.