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  5. "Onko sillä taas nälkä?"

"Onko sillä taas nälkä?"

Translation:Is it hungry again?

July 22, 2020

6 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iamkcdot

The rollover tips ("Onko silla" = "Does it have") are great here - yay!! I understand how the actual words relate to the meaning intended. I can see how "silla" comes from "se" which is "it" and when I add "-lla" to he/she/they/we/I that usually means "she/he/they/we/I have/has" The correct answer, however, is more about meaning translation. When I come into these discussions for help, I really get stuck when people explain things with words like "adessive". That just brings up more questions, for me. I can totally get behind "Does it have hunger again" to mean "Is it hungry again".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spinach_Sheik

I agree with you there, sometimes people just need to understand how the translations work without learning fancy linguistic terms for this particular language.

Personally, I find it easier to understand how a language works from the inside using linguistic terms to confirm my understanding, but I understand that isn't even how the average native speaker learns their language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spinach_Sheik

I agree with you there, sometimes people just need to understand how the translations work without learning fancy linguistic terms for this particular language.

Personally, I find it easier to understand how a language works from the inside using linguistic terms to confirm my understanding, but I understand that isn't even how the average native speaker learns their language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdithyaSrikantan

How is silla = it in this translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vudar95

"Sillä" is "se" in adessiivi (adessive case). Just like "minulla" is adessive of "minä" and "sinulla" is adessive of "sinä".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spinach_Sheik

In Finnish, you would say "minulla nälkä" meaning "I have hunger." In English, hunger and thirst are described as what a person is rather than what a person has. This means that in English we would say "I am hungry." Since the subject of this sentence is "it" and not "I," you would translate this sentence as "it is hungry," even though the Finnish literally translates to "It has hunger."

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