"As captain do you feel more responsible?"

Translation:Da capitano ti senti più responsabile?

May 15, 2013

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/carinofranco

Schetino! va a bordo!

May 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris123456

Clever, witty remark, carinofranco :) I do, however, feel deeply concerned that the Costa Concordia disaster will undoubtedly still be a cause of much sadness and distress to people. Maybe this isn't the right place? Might I suggest you edit this?

May 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/carinofranco

Chris, Thanks for your comment. Yes, the Costa Concordia disaster was indeed a tragedy of first order. The remark, "va a bordo" is not mine, but is a shortened and sanitized version of the command given by the Italian coast guard to the Captain pertaining to his cowardice and dereliction of duty. it has been parodied worldwide..there are even T shirt with this remark. For learners of Italian, I suggest that they look up the actual dialog between the captain and the coast guard available online to see what a real life interchange sounds like. I apologize to anyone I may have offended,

May 16, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Chris123456

Thanks for this very helpful explanation.

May 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Beppe
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ok: some clarifications. First of all. "Schetino" sounds like "cretino" (=fool), but is wrong, since the surname is "Schettino", with the double "t". I know that, for English speaking people, the double consonants may be a problem (just like the English short/long vowels for Italian learners ..), but Italian makes an extensive use of double consonants and it is better to pay attention to it. Second: the actual frase of the cost guard captain was more complicated: "vada a bordo. ****" http://knowyourmeme.com/memes/events/costa-concordia-disaster-vada-a-bordo-cazzo that is a mix of formal Italian speaking (conjunctive instead of imperative + "lei", i.e. the "formal you" in Italian) and a profanity (just to enforce and clarify the formal order ...). Third: the imperative "go" has two forms. "vai" and the abbreviated "va". "Va" seems to me more common, Ciao

May 19, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/silkwarrior

I put "senti" but DL appears to insist on "ti senti". Surely the "ti" is optional?

February 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/malcolmissimo

Ti is required because the verb has no object and therefore must be reflexive, sentirsi responsabile: to feel oneself responsible.

The verb should really be Si sente, formal you. One doesn't address someone by their formal title and then use the informal verb. Note for tourists - never say tu to a police officer!

September 9, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/mdsawyermd

That's what I thought too...

March 31, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Dobblo
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I thought the same but the verb must be 'sentirsi', no?

June 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/tessroselli

ditto - can someone explain?

September 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Dobblo
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In this situation the captain does not 'feel' in the physical sense of 'touching' something beyond himself (sentire), but in the sense of being 'aware' by 'thinking'. The action of 'feeling' in this sense is carried out by the subject (the captain) and applied to the same subject (the captain) and consequently it is the reflexive form of the verb (sentirsi) that is required.

September 24, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Chel451498

Grazie mille Dobblo! Finally an explanation that I can understand for these odd verb-si. A lingot for you.

November 13, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Dobblo
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I am thinking 'da' in the sense of 'modo' refers more to the ROLE of captain than to the individual - il capitano. - and consequently to the mode of behaviour expected from a person who is in this role. The captain is not specified as an individual.

I note also the following phrase from WordReference.com. also without the article. comportarsi da uomo - to behave like a man

September 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ZibbiG

Thank you! that was a helpful explanation.

September 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/ZibbiG

Can someone explain why "il capitano" is incorrect, with use of the definite article being so prevelent in Italian?

September 14, 2014
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