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"Tenez, je vous ai fait des biscuits à la vanille."

Translation:Here you go; I made you some vanilla cookies.

July 23, 2020

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tessa385184

I would prefer to say "Here you are, I have made you some vanilla biscuits" I never say "Here you go" nor "I made you" Sounds very American.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac433425

Since "tiens/tenez" literally mean "hold," are they ever used in the same way as "hold on" in the sense of "wait a moment?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jojo553168

No, not really. We say tiens when we mean take this or hold this.
It is also rather common in expressions like Tiens, ça alors ! or Tiens donc ! or even Tiens tiens tiens! expressing doubt and/or surprise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac433425

Ah very interesting, thank you!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeanne448353

The SLOW AUDIO cuts out - only says "Tenez, je vous. . ."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda4tennis

I am really annoyed at 'here you are' being marked incorrect - it is much


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Norman491209

Here you are, I made you some vanilla biscuits in UK English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XgwJ4UVx

Google translate says Here you are


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom692084

"You Go" is completely superfluous, and impossible to deduce from "tenir". "Here. I made you some cookies is the best fit IMHO, and to my thinking, even though Jojo553168 disagrees, with all due respect to Jojo, I am addressing the common sense of the translation of "tenir" to "Here you go", which just doesn't wash at all. "Hold it. I made you some cookies" makes more sense, although it may not be what the native speaker intends.

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