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  5. "Isä, minulla on nälkä."

"Isä, minulla on nälkä."

Translation:Father, I am hungry.

July 25, 2020

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Iloveraspberries

Hei nälkä, olen isä


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha757388

Doesn't quite work in Finnish, at least not standard Finnish and this specific construction. "Isä, olen nälkäinen" -> "Hei nälkäinen, olen isä" works better.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Durple_Purple

Or maybe "Nälkä? Missä hän on?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha757388

"Nälkä" on its own translates to "hunger". Saying that you "have hunger" is one way of saying you're hungry, but there's also an adjective that directly means "hungry": "nälkäinen".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FrelimaOma

Can you say isa olen nälkä


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boarcas

That would be Father, I am hunger, so no.

Isä, olen nälkäinen is another way of saying you're hungry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NLWjVi

I find it very stange that nälkä is a noun, but jano is an adjective.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NLWjVi

Nevermind, I was wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha757388

On the web version, you can edit and delete past comments.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LailaMonah

Most people refer to their fathers in some diminutive or more familiar form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha757388

Eh, it varies. My siblings and I used isä practically exclusively since we were quite young, my kid uses it sometimes (but not most of the time), I think my mother used mostly isä for her father even as a kid, and so on. I don't think isä is particularly rare, but you're welcome to dig up some statistics to prove me wrong if you want, that could be rather interesting to see what the spread was really like.

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