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"Heeft Nederland een koud klimaat?"

Translation:Does the Netherlands have a cold climate?

0
4 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/countvlad
countvlad
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the Netherlands is plural, I think; therefore: " 'do' the Netherlands have a cold climate" should be accepted. 'Does" sounds wrong to me. Any ideas?

14
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RemkoAlexander

It's actually singular, just like 'the United States', 'the measels' and 'the Olympics' are as well.

10
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marisa779658
Marisa779658
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I don't discuss the Dutch grammar but the English grammar. English grammar is the same in the USA, In the Uk, in Australia etc.. and The Netherlands is plural and need a plural verb. We cannot complain as everything on Duo is free of charge

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dennislysenko
dennislysenko
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Huh? "Do the United States have a cold climate" is totally a correct thing to say

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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Correct perhaps, but it would probably be more commonly found in a 19th century book than a modern conversation. The singular verb form came to vastly predominate around 1910. The ratio isn't quite as large for "the Netherlands," but singular predominates there, too, depending on the verb more in UK English than US.

2
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/countvlad
countvlad
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Thanks!

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Looking at wikipedia the singular form is used. But indeed in similar cases where one entity is made up of multiple things, the plural form is used, like in: the police, the committee or the series. I don't know why this is different, any English speaker that can enlighten us?

1
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kai_E.
Kai_E.
Mod
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I suppose it's because we're all really referring to a single country when talking about "the Netherlands" or "the United States", not, say, a group of "lands" in "the Netherlands" or specifically the "States" in "the United States".

6
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Honore
Honore
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Yes, countries all take a singular verb, even if its name looks plural. Thus: "The Philippines has a congressional system, as does the United States; the Netherlands does not." As for why, I'm not exactly sure, but I think it's the one nation concept.

This has a good overview of general use: http://www.economist.com/style-guide/singular-or-plural

8
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Yet I would say exactly the same thing about the police…silly English language. ;)

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya
wataya
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This is a difference between British and American English. In AE, normally the singular form is used after collective nouns while BE often uses the plural. E.g. in BE you can say "the government are planning…".

4
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/countvlad
countvlad
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Thanks; that's interesting. Yes I would say the "government IS planning" (Canadian)

1
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/countvlad
countvlad
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Susande...Thanks! However, isn't "committee" like "crowd": singular: "The crowd is quiet; the committee is upset."

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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It looks like it depends whether it is UK or US English (I have no idea about other countries, but based on your posts in Canada it is the same as in the US) and it also depends on the situation, e.g. this link or this link.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/countvlad
countvlad
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those are great links!!! I still prefer the "logic" of specifying the individuals of a group instead of using the plural, as being the more logical solution (2nd link). (E.g. "The members of the committee" are undecided; instead of "The committee" are undecided. [Grammar logic as in German.]

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranald3
Ranald3
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Exactly right Vlad.

0
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marisa779658
Marisa779658
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I have to be wrong in order to get through my test and write does instead of do.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/countvlad
countvlad
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Haha ... 'wrong' seems to be such a matter of convention; maybe there is no 'wrong' except in how we say it is

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranald3
Ranald3
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The country is a singular entity, therefore "does" is gramatically correct. This is such a common error. "Do the cities of the Netherlands have..." is correct because "do" qualifies the plural cities. Whereas, "does the city in the Netherlands...." qualifies the singular city.

0
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/piguy3
piguy3
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Google NGrams, which surveys only published books, shows consistent lack of unanimity in which verb form to chose for the Netherlands for the last 200 years. Singular is, indeed, ahead now, but that's a phenomenon only a few decades old.

See here.

0
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mollypoddled

Has the Netherlands a cold climate???

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Glenn392709

"Why "koud" and not "kou"

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
NCThom
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"Koud" is an adjective; "kou" is a noun.

Het koude klimaat is koud vanwege de kou.

0
Reply1 week ago