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  5. "Non so se ci abbiano pensato…

"Non so se ci abbiano pensato."

Translation:I do not know if they have thought about it.

May 16, 2013

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nictheman

Is there a reason that this can't be "I don't know if they have thought about us"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaraDePauUK

I still don't understand why ci can mean both us and it (and there). Wouldn't "it" be la or lo? Is it because it's an indirect pronoun? Don't even get me started on "ne".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sofia222677

"Ci" means "about it" here, not just 'it'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/siebolt

I can't think of one. But I would have said "non so se abbiano pensato a noi."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jae633849

"I don't know if they thought of us" accepted as per March 2018.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DominiqueB19

This is what I used and it was accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaelCappra

I believe 'about us' would be 'a noi'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roberto_34

Yes, in Italian "ci" has both meanings. Should be also "have thought in this (or that) place"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeromeLuch

Why not "thought it" ? This is idiomatic British English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lisyaorancrazed

For people who read this in the future, it's probably because the courses for english speakers typically use standard american english.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gmcolletti

Aside from what DL accepts, since 'Ci penso io' means 'I'll take care of it', in this third person plural subjunctive whatever the hell tense it is, could this also mean

...if they took care of it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maz1269

yes, "i don't know if they have taken care of it" should be accepted, as pensarci = take care of / deal with. wasn't accepted here tho. but should be. and it's subjunctive perfect, btw, as the lesson is called


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/divaluisa

Can someone clarify for me: "Ci" can be "us" or "it" Right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/siebolt

"ci" means "us" as object and indirect object. "ci" can mean "at it" or "about it" "ci penso io" = I'll take care of it / I think about it. "ci" can mean "there" non c'è nessuno" "nobody is there". Better learn some standard sentences with the different meanings. As you see everything depends on the context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/divaluisa

Thank you very much


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WquDT
  • 1022

I don't know if they have thought of us- accepted. I don't know if they have thought about us- not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sanaestheticss

What is the grammatical purpose of "ci" in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ariaflame

To represent the thing (or people) being thought of.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roberto_34

I'm Italian. "Non so se ci hanno pensato" is correct. The subjunctive is not used with "know", but only with "believe, think, suppose, imagine..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sofia222677

Another Italian here. E invece il congiuntivo si usa anche con pensare (io stessa lo uso e sento altri usarlo): https://www.treccani.it/enciclopedia/uso-del-prontuario-congiuntivo_%28Enciclopedia-dell%27Italiano%29/

To non-Italians: using the subjuntive mood with "pensare" is absolutely correct, the user I'm replying to is mistaken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/daniel87359

Pensarci = think about it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardWal528974

Question for native Italian speakers. How is "about" translated here please? I would have expected a "ne" somewhere?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobMallord

PENSARCI = THINK ABOUT IT. The verb pensarci mean to think about it. If one simply uses l' or lo the word "about" would not be included.

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