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"The strange Australian man does not know how to barbecue properly."

Translation:Outo australialainen mies ei osaa grillata oikein.

July 28, 2020

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Can an adjective like australialainen be used substantively, or does it always need a noun such as mies?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ida6392

A correct English translation for this sentence should be "can't" grill properly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Are you saying Finnish has another verb yhat translates to know how to more properly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ida6392

That should have said ‘a’. Whoops! [edited]. There are a few ways can is translated depending on the reason you can. Osata is skill. Tbh this should also be the default translation for other sentences to avoid confusion with voida (ability) and saada (permission)


[deactivated user]

    Yes, there is the literal translation: tietää miten.

    Australialainen ei tiedä miten grillataan. This translates exactly to "does not know how".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaymondElFuego

    Couldn't an english translation for this have been with "hyvin": "Outoa australialainen mies ei osaa grillata hyvin" ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

    As well as "...grillata kunnolla."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveA.B.

    A so-called 'correct' translation has zero-to- negative value compared to what achieves the desired result. A correct translation is rarely a good translation. Words are meaningless without context, and that includes social context. Natsume Soseki, the author, taught that "I love you" in Japanese is (literarily) "Tonight the moon is blue."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

    I'm sure Mr Natsume was making a good point, as I am sure you are, though I'm not sure quite what you mean. The most common way to translate "I love you" in Japanese would probably be 愛している, which more or less means "I love you." A couple of phrases that mean quite literally "I like you" or "I like you a lot" might also be common. In all of these, both the subject and object are supplied by the context. It would be quite an odd context for one to say "Tonight the moon is blue" and expect it to be understood as "I love you" in Japanese.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveA.B.

    Hi James, Natsume Soseki wrote "I am a Cat", among other novels. He is the most famous name in modern Japanese literary history, meaning post Meiji Restoration. My point and his point is that to get the reaction you expect from I love you in English, you cannot say 愛している。Unless, of course, you are non-Japanese.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

    Mr Natsume was, indeed, an important figure in modern Japanese literature, and it is very Japanese to think that there is a single undisputed most famous name in modern Japanese literary history. In the late 19c, his observation may have been correct. It certainly seemed odd given what I have seen in Japanese cinema, so I asked my sister what she had observed in the thirty yeats she has lived in Japan. She said that the phrases I pointed out seem to have precisely the same effect as I love you does in English. Of course, there has been a wave of Western cultural influence on Japan in the century since Natsume died, so that may have produced the change that appears to have occurred.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SteveA.B.

    My wife begs to differ. I have lived in Japan for fifty years and speak, read, and write at native level. How many times have I heard あいしている?Quite a few. Who said it? I did. What was the effect? "What the f#$k?" Why? Read what Japanese people have to say: https://hinative.com/ja/questions/14019185


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

    Hmm, it may be a difference of region, generation, or even just social group.

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