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  5. "Het duurt eeuwen."

"Het duurt eeuwen."

Translation:It takes centuries.

August 11, 2014

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpcabd
  • "Hallo, ik wil een pizza alstublieft."
  • "Waar wonen U alsjeblieft?"
  • "Ik woon in België maar ik kom uit Nederland, hoelang duurt het?"
  • "Het duurt eeuwen, sorry"
  • "Geen probleem, bedankt"

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UnitarioRe

looool

Terwijl, wil jij iets drinken?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jazzy.R.L

I actually got this! Yay!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NirRL

Me too, it's actually exciting!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bear_Polonaise

Would this sentence also mean 'It takes ages', or is there another, more appropriate expression for this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dibbeldabbel

I was wondering the same. I simply cannot imagine a situation in which I would say "It takes centuries" in English, unless I was talking about, say, the origin of coal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minicast

could 'it lasts centuries' be also correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nierls

Yes, in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TousifJama

To win a match of cricket


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lun678602

Can anyone give me an IPA transcription of 'eeuwen' please?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/acul3609

It should be /eːu̯.ən/ in standard Dutch but the specific vowels vary pretty wildly in different dialects.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Eryashnik

Het doesn't seem to entirely be pronounced here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Helenzie

"eeuwen" sounds close to the english word "eons" meaning "ages". But is the meaning more specifically "centuaries"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilmolleggi

Doesn't duren mean to dure? And if so, why is "it dures centuries" not accepted? I reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HughB_au

'to dure' isn't a word in English. To 'endure' is, maybe that is your confusion?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilmolleggi

Ok so apparently I read too many archaic (?) books, it seems to have existed but to have come out of fashion: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/dure#English

So I guess Duo's got a point in not accepting it ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HughB_au

Yes, I have never come across it in modern (Australian) English at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChrisStehl

Middle English is from the Middle Ages and is much closer to Germanic languages. English speakers also don't say "Sumer Is icumen in" anymore. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sMCA9nYnLWo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkBennett6

And although that song is from the Middle English period, the vocabulary is almost entirely Old English, so it's even more Germanic than might be expected for its age. Maybe the poet was an Anglish nationalist?

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