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"The winter has passed."

Translation:L'inverno è passato.

5 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/gsir
gsir
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What is wrong with the "l'imverno ha passato"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beethoven96

The verb here is "passare" - since the verb doesn't take a direct object, you have to use the auxiliary verb "essere".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gsir
gsir
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Agreed, thanks, I posted that question a year ago, and by now I wouldn't make this mistake :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arekolek
arekolek
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I'm pretty sure the winter is (still) coming.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LuizAngelo8

Adesso, l'inverno già ha arrivato.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abelie

'E passato l'inverno' - isn't this the same in Italian as 'L'inverno e passato '?(apologies for the lack of accents). In the Italian language I often see the verb placed before the noun - am I losing something in translation?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mukkapazza
mukkapazza
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Nope! You've actually helped us out. Your translation works now as well.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rafforza
Rafforza
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L'inverno è inferno

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valerieheath

why essere and not avere?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roadlawyer
Roadlawyer
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This is one of those awful verbs that can take either essere or avere depending on the context. If it is a transitive verb that takes a direct object then you use avere, if it is an intransitive verb that doesn't take a direct object then you use essere.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valerieheath

Thanks, I was forgetting that little clue. :((

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erick_Gomez

What my italian teacher taught me is that if a word is of movement AND has an oppisite (in this case it's pasare, and venire would be the oppisite and they are words of movement) you use esere.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoBuosi
JoBuosi
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The question before this one asked me to translate "L'inverno è passato." I've translated as "the winter has passed" and it was marked as wrong. The right translation was "the winter is passed".
NOW it is asking me to mark the correct translation for "The winter has passed"... and surprisingly the correct option is "L'inverno è passato."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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The one before was wrong, probably a native Italian speaker making an English mistake. (Both ‘have’ and ‘is’ are correct here in English —and I would usually say ‘have’—, but only ‘è’ is correct here in Italian.)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christos2199

Why is this L'inverno and not Il inverno? Still pretty new to this.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VenusRaks

How the heck am i supposed to type accents? Non ci sono nel tasitera

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pearl2011

Why the 'io'form of 'passato'??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silkwarrior

It's not the "io" form - it's the past participle. http://www.italian-verbs.com/italian-verbs/conjugation.php?verbo=passato

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dwing1913

Why isn't the past participle in agreement with the subject, winter, since aux verb is taking essere

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dwing1913

Oops my error it does agree with gender invernO

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adv3rs4ry
Adv3rs4ry
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Why is it "L'inverno É passato" but "Quarant'anni passarono"? I can't understand when to use essere and when not to. What is the rule here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaIramendy

How do you say this sentence in English? Wouldn't you say the winter is finished? Since when the winter passes? perhaps the winter went by?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MiniMikayla

Since when does "è" mean has? Why i tapped on 'has' the two options where 'abbia' & 'ha' but it was marked wrong???

3 years ago