"He believes everything that I say."

Translation:Crede tutto ciò che dico.

May 17, 2013

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jgbachand

Why is "cio" in here at all? Is this an idiom? "Crede tutto che dico" seems to translate all the words...

September 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mfelix

"Tutto" in this sentence doesn't translate to "everything", it translates better to "every". It's an adjective. While there are times "tutto" can serve as a noun, this isn't one of them. A more literal translation is "He believes all that which I say", with "that" as a noun.

November 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/jgbachand

Thank you. I'm so used to hearing "Tutto va bene?" and "E' tutto in posto?" around the house, I lost track of the fact that "tutto" is also an adjective. Grazie.

November 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Matthias1414

"È tutto a posto?" would be the correct sentence: "Everything alright?"

April 20, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/Marninger

ciò = this / that
che = that / which
ciò che = this which ~ what

"Crede, tutto, ciò che, dico" =
"He/she/it believes, everything, what, I say" ~
"He believes in everything I say"

"Non è belle ciò che belle, ma è belle ciò che piace" =
"Not beautiful this which is beautiful, but beautiful what is liked" ~
"Beauty is in the eye of the beholder"

July 24, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Davide.310

The translate is wrong... in this case "credere" is intransitive, and it can be only "credere in" or "credere a". "Credere qualcosa" it's not italian. You can use "credere" as transitive in a sentence like "Credo che farò tardi"="I think I will be late"

January 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/pierobonal

We normally say "crede A tutto ciò che dico". Because you "credi a qualcosa" not "credi qualcosa". Grammatica italiana.

January 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/ckyle8

Funny, but this sentence was in lesson 5, too, only then it was translated as "Crede a tutto quello che dico." I have to ask, which is the more common way of saying it? Or is it a situational difference?

August 29, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/AntonyHodgson

I think that 'quello/a/e/i che' is used when there are more concrete objects already referred to in the conversation, whereas cio is used when the thing being referred to is more abstract or unspecified. I understand that quello can be used anywhere cio is used. Could someone with more Italian experience please confirm this?

September 8, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mfelix

Sounds right to me. Ciò would never be used to indicate a distant object the way "quello" is, but quello can be used in the abstract sense that you mentioned. Credo a quello che dici/Credo a ciò che dici.

September 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/AntonyHodgson

More discussion of cio vs quello at http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=226708 Of most interest is that cio is considered more formal and correct in written work, whereas quello is the most common spoken form.

November 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mangoHero1

I just still don't get why cio or quello are used at all if there's no "that" or "this" in the sentence.

October 24, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mfelix

English is more liberal about dropping "that" than Italian is about dropping "che". "The food that I eat is good" and "the food I eat is good" are both valid English, but you can't say "il cibo mangio è buono". "Che" is required in a lot more places than "that".

November 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisMarti263082

I didn't understand the usage at first, but It just occurred to me that ( I think) "ciò che" is identical to "lo que" in Spanish! Any Italian-Spanish speakers care to confirm this?

September 4, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/bill_oneill51

this whole exercise has many "correct" translations from Italian to English which in fact are either incorrect or are very awkward in English.

May 17, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/David1945

Yes, I agree. But if we English speakers offer more natural alternatives the programme will improve and on our second try of the unit we will get it right!

May 27, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/RobBlaney

Can someone explain why both "cio" and "che"? I understood "che" to mean that. I know we can't translate literally word-for-word, but this phrase seems to double up: Crede - he believes tutto - everything che - that dico - I say

November 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/AntonyHodgson

cio che often has the sense of 'that which', but it can frequently be translated most directly as simply 'what' or 'that' (eg, 'ripetere cio che avete detto' - repeat what (that which) you said)). In the current phrase, it doesn't translate exactly to English (we wouldn't say 'he believes everything that which I say'), but there is a sense in which 'cio che' refers back to the 'everything' previously mentioned. If it's any consolation, Google Translate renders 'lui crede tutto che dico' as 'he believes everything I say', so perhaps the cio isn't really needed. :)

November 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/jgbachand

grazie

November 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mfelix

But "lui crede che dico" isn't valid Italian. Google is just guessing there. The ciò is definitely needed, or possibly quello.

November 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/AntonyHodgson

I guess I still don't understand why cio is definitely needed. There are certainly constructions like this where 'cio' is not needed (eg, credo che tu sei gentile). Is the 'cio' needed after 'crede tutto' because 'tutto' is the thing believed and 'dico' is modifying 'tutto', whereas in my example the 'tu sei gentile' is the thing believed and there's no modifier? (btw, I never trust GT, especially on anything other than the simplest of phrases - it really doesn't understand most tenses at all).

November 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mfelix

Basically these are two different ways to use credere: credere che + independent clause, and credere + object. Like in English, where we could say "I believe that you are smart" vs. "I believe your words". In "credo che tu sia gentile" it's the first style, where the "che" is joining two independent clauses: "io credo" and "tu sia gentile". In "crede (tutto) ciò che dico", it's the second style, where "crede" is taking an object, which is "ciò che dico" ("that which I say").

November 15, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/RobBlaney

@AntonyHodgson: Thanks - that's very helpful, and confirms (simplifies!) what I have since found through additional research.

November 14, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail

As "tutto" is also an adverb, how about "he believes totally/completely what I say" ?

January 16, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/KatherineT463851

I believe that might be one of those rare situations where the modifier switches places, so it would become "tutto crede" to say that he believes entirely or completely.

March 29, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/ejuniorls

Why is "tutto" and not "tutti"?

July 20, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulo333866

Why is everything not in the plural and therefore 'tutti'

September 9, 2018
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