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"Elle veut passer demain."

Translation:She wants to stop by tomorrow.

5 years ago

58 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/djbrubacher

Passer has a LOT of possible meanings. If you translate this as "She wants to stop by tomorrow", that would make sense in English, meaning that she'll stop in to see you tomorrow. Is that correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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yes, and it is also what "elle veut passer demain" means.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alfissleeping
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/effy0509

I can't think of any case in English where you would say 'she wants to pass tomorrow' - except if she was sitting an exam or something, and I didn't think that 'passer' was used in this case? Maybe 'pass by tomorrow' or something? Can anyone help me out? (Native english speaker)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ndodger
ndodgerPlus
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I am English too. It can mean drop in pass by pop in visit the house tomorrow

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

I agree with you @ndodger. So does Collins. Here are two of the definitions of the transitive French verb passer according to Collins French-English Dictionary--the ones I think could apply to this exercise:

1) (= aller) "to go", "to pass", "to pass by", "to go by"

2) (= faire une halte rapide)

  • [facteur] "to come", "to call"

  • [pour rendre visite] "to call in", "to drop in"

(Source)

I was marked wrong for "she wants to pass by tomorrow" and I have reported it. (May 2, 2016).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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If the meaning were "to pass by" (go by, no stop), there would be an indication:

  • elle peut passer devant / par ici / par là...
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nicholas_ashley

Sitesurf

Mere-des-chats is correct. In this context pass by does not literally mean go past without stopping.

In UK English it is very common to use pass by or drop by to mean stop by

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

I just got an email stating that "pass by" is now accepted as a translation for passer in this exercise. Which makes sense as void of context, my proposal is just as correct as yours. After all, just as you point out that there is not indication that she does not want stop but simply wants to pass by, neither is there any indication that she actually wants to stop since we are not told what she will do while there. I could see my proposal working well in the following scenario:

According to Mary's friends, since she has been taking a different route to work, she has been missing out on some major eye candy at your coffee shop. So she is anxious to feast her eyes on that Adonis I hear you hired. She wants to pass by tomorrow.


Have you heard of the new coffee shop on Aldwych?

Yeah, I work there!

Well, Mary cannot wait to try the speciality coffees you offer. She wants to pass by tomorrow.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SleepyTinman
SleepyTinman
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I just put "pass by" and it was not accepted

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

I hope you reported it.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marionmehr

Funny, I had She wants to stop by tomorrow as a " c o r r e c t i o n " duo, please time consuming and irritating

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Next time please post a screenshot because we don't understand what happened.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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The owl is a bit wiser about the translation of "passer" to English, i.e., that "pass by" is not how English is used in this context. She wants to "stop by, drop by, drop in, stop in" for a brief visit.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanBurry
DanBurry
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I am not happy that my 'i want to pass by tomorrow' was not accepted. And i cannot think of anything wrong with my answer, especially considering that it was the intended meaning in French.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mere_des_chats

Perhaps it is because it was not YOU who wants to pass by tomorrow but rather SHE.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Christophe596074

'Call by' is a perfectly sound British English idiom - and is satisfactory here as a translation, surely.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carol331538

In Scotland we say "call past"

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/evelim1972

what on earth does "passer" mean? come is wrong here, pass is wrong there!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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passer = stop by (come for a short visit)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cripner

My dictionary says 'passer' in relation to time means spend as well as pass. It makes more sense in this phrase which it seems to me is incomplete. Our French teacher, who is French, uses it in the same way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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passer + direct object = spend + direct object

  • je passe mes vacances en Italie = I spend my vacation in Italy

passer with no object = pass (by) = stop/drop by = spend a short time somewhere

  • je passe (pour) dire bonjour = I stop by to say hello
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paul_W
Paul_W
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She wants to spend (time) tomorrow isn't allowed so I'm a little confused at that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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"Passer du temps" = spend time. So one doesn't just "spend", but "spend time" which requires "du temps".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrBTTF
MrBTTF
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Why is "by" here? I wrote "She wants to come tomorrow", but it is wrong

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

To "come by" is different from simply "to come". "To come by" or "to drop by" or "to stop by", or "to stop in" or to "look in"...(there are probably others), all have a particular meaning of making a very brief visit, usually on the way to somewhere else.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

Just thought of another one: "to pop by" or "to pop in". Ha.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Diana, I have changed the Best Translation for "stop by" and removed "pass by" altogether. This does not show at the top of this page, but all your suggestions are now valid and should be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John787925

You could write a book on the use of the word "pop" in casual English...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rafi.zon
Rafi.zon
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What about "come over" instead of "come by"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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Good one. "Come over" is now accepted as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RICHARDBER583347
RICHARDBER583347
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What about "stop over"? DL did not accept it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelHome

"She wants to pop by tomorrow" getting very casual there duo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clrtnb
clrtnb
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I think I've mainly heard, "I was just passing (by)," as an explanation for why someone has dropped in for a visit without prior arrangement.

By the way, there may be a generational difference here... To my father, who reached adulthood in the 1940s, dropping in unannounced is perfectly normal & OK; perhaps it was more usual before nearly everybody had telephones. I'm a Boomer, and I don't consider that at all polite.

-- 3rd generation Canadian English speaker of UK ancestry, raised unilingual in Vancouver.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/effyleven
effyleven
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I got this as a listening exercise. Duo translated as "She wants to STOP by tomorrow," which makes a good deal more sense, in colloquial English at least.... notwithstanding that "passing" and "stopping" are close to opposite in meaning.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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Actually, you should understand the verb "passer" as "stop by", which points to a short visit.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/easyskanki

She wants to pass by tomorrow would have been a completely accurate translation but I got it incorrect!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejandroR666
AlejandroR666
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She wants to pass by tomorrow was accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaM

"Pass by" does not mean the same thing in English as "stop by" or "drop in". A person who passed by some place would not stop at all, would just go right on without a pause.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/llamnuds

Totally agree to pass by and to drop by or drop in are opposites in English. You might even use them together, " I'm passing by your house tomorrow, I'll drop in."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Geoff246946

No that's not right - pass by does mean to stop for a short time. I am just passing by - is often something you say when you call to see a friend but do not intend staying - the message is don't bother making tea or coffee because I've just called into to say hello or drop something off. It is perfectly proper English - well it is in Yorkshire anyway.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/n6zs
n6zs
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"Pass by" is really not good English for this context. Stop by, come by, stop in, stop by, pop in, pop over, come over, drop in, drop by....all work, but "pass by" is not idiomatic English for the meaning of the French.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZacharyFis13

I disagree. Among many people in Canada at least "pass by" would be considered idiomatic. It's certainly less casual than "pop over".

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/poltomin
poltomin
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Not knowing the verb passer, I assumed she wanted to pass (an exam) tomorrow, which was rejected. I now see passer means "to drop by". Which leaves the question: how does one pass an exam in French?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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To pass an exam = réussir un examen

To take an exam = passer un examen

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/poltomin
poltomin
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Merci beaucoup !

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clrtnb
clrtnb
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I often hear "pass" by itself meaning die, and with the right to assisted dying in the news this week (in BC Canada), I was interested to see "die" as a word choice in the translation pick list.. It was marked wrong in this translation exercise, but: Is there a similar euphemism in French??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aussie3931
aussie3931
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We would say 'She wants to call in tomorrow' which is what I wrote. Not accepted. We also say 'pop in' or 'drop by' or 'drop in' but not 'stop by'. That sounds very odd in my corner of the world, but clearly used in the US.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulmacd
paulmacd
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"She wants to cross tomorrow" (As in cross a bridge; cross the border) was not accepted. I realise that one could use "traverser" instead, but is "passer" definitely wrong in this context?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sitesurf
Sitesurf
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We would use another verb in this case: elle veut traverser demain.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/casacere
casacere
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IN Jump or Blacker Hill I am sure you could say "call by".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/denavancou

Pop???

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sezen736553

"she wants to pass by" is not accepted, and "pop by" is suggested. Why?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sweeper66
Sweeper66
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I'm also getting failed for saying "she wants to pass by tomorrow" instead of "she wants to pop in tomorrow".

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Martha802842

pass by still not accepted

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sue_Parkes

'She wants to stop by tomorrow' puts me only in the mind of someone stopping something, ie smoking, and she will stop by tomorrow. This is a very awkward phrase!

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sue_Parkes

Yes I know it but the phrase is still awkward. As a simple set of words in that order it can mean what DL says (though personally I'd go for 'pop in' as mentioned by others here). But it can also mean the act of stopping viz she is drinking too much wine; she wants to stop by tomorrow.

1 month ago