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"Ven cuando tengas tiempo."

Translation:Come when you have time.

5 years ago

57 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/dofn2

For anyone caught out, ven here is the imperative of venir, and not referring to indicative ellos ven from ver

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

I never thought that teaching the subjunctive would be attempted without some grammar instruction. It seems too complicated. Nevertheless, I'm loving the exercises because I am here for review. I was taught the grammar of the subjunctive mood years ago. I highly recommend Duolingo for review.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Isaiah-

Yeah, I never had a formal lesson, and was struggling, and then I followed some links suggested by fellow users to websites that explained a little bit. Now, armed with that knowledge, I feel like I can go through these lessons until it's drilled in. What Duo lacks is easily supplemented with other free websites. That I had learned the subjunctive sooner!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emreitz

could you tell us what sites you are referring to?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JobeyinError

Seriously, there's a ton out there, and it's just a Google search away ("Spanish subjunctive"). Hard to go wrong.

I do find Ask.com's Spanish section to be reliably helpful.

Some people also prefer searching on YouTube, because many times you can get someone who will explain verbally and flash examples on the screen.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tayjes16
tayjes16
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Regarding Youtube videos, I'd highly recommend searching for the "Professor Jason" Spanish lessons. He has produced dozens of videos covering everything from basic pronunciation to more advanced topics such as the subjunctive.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tampanews

Here's a very extensive guide posted by someone on Duolingo: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/8828180

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BartMilner

Studyspanish has several tutorials on the subjunctive. I found their initial explanation really helpful, in the way that it simplifies a complex issue http://studyspanish.com/grammar/lessons/subj1

"The subjunctive mood is rarely used in English, but it is widely used in Spanish..." (In Spanish) "The subjunctive mood is used to express everything except certainty and objectivity: things like doubt, uncertainty, subjectivity, etc...."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redphillips

I agree this needs more pre-instruction. Unfortunately Duolingo just doesn't really have a format for that, nor would they be expected to. But somebody ought to reconsider having only three lesson blocks for this, along with ONLY ONE for subjunctive past. C'mon, gang... give us a workout!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelRD
SamuelRD
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This question is on the imperative, not the subjunctive. Yes you would think they could just put an article at the start of the lesson to go over the key points, such as the negative vs positive conjugations of regular verbs for the imperative.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Kierz_
_Kierz_
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Is it irregular?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dwallace

Hi. Yes it is. There are 8 irregular Affirmative "Tu" commands. A great memory aid I saw was," Ven di sal haz ten ve pon se?." Put on your best James Bond Baddie Accent and maybe get a cat to stroke etc- Van Diesel has ten weapons eh?

Ven=Venir

Di=Decir

Sal=Salir

Haz=Hacer

Ten= Tener

Ve= Ir

Pon= Poner

Se= Ser

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dar320
Dar320
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I may give you a lingot evey time I use this.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dwallace

:)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConfettiChamber

Thank you so much! I learned 95% of my Spanish through observation growing up in Texas and immersion living in Mexico, but this is a formal explanation I needed!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lulularosa
lulularosa
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muy gracias!

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BirdMane

Isn't this exactly the same '' Venga cuando tienes tiempo ''

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gejemica
gejemica
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Venir is used in the imperative so must be ven (for tú), venga (for Ud.), vengaís (vosotros) or vengan (for Uds.)

Constructions like this, which imply a future action must have that action in the subjunctive, so tenir must be either tengas, tenga, tengaís or tengan depending on precisely which "you" you went for.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fteisot
fteisot
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venid ( vosotros)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleGoetz
KyleGoetz
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I understand the subjunctive is used for irrealis constructions and hopes/desires, but why is the subjunctive used here for when something is true. Does it imply the person might not have time, while cuando tienes tiempo implies the person probably will have time?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatriciaJH
PatriciaJH
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I think it implies that it's unknown whether or not the person will have time. I get the impression that some standard English statements simply have a greater inherent certainty than the more-or-less equivalent Spanish -- that Spanish uses the subjunctive where the English speaker doesn't really see an uncertainty.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/travelingplans

In these situations I translate" cuando" as "whenever." Using "whenever" means that you don't know for sure when this will happen (or even if the person will every have the time) so you use the subjective.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hesolomon

Why is it "tengan" insteas of "tengas?" "Ven" is plural and referring to "you."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/junevilleco

ven is imperative for tú; imperative for ustedes would be vengan (negatve tú would be no vengas)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mosdan

still stuck on this - negative tú would be 'no vengas' - so why is positive tú 'ven', not 'vengas', as is indicated on duolingo's drop-down conjugation menu? this is a bugger to conjugate

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Ven is the imperative for tú

Vengas would be the subjunctive for tú

The drop-down menu is just a general dictionary type translator, and often includes misleading and flat out wrong translations. Use a paper dictionary or an online translator like WordReference or SpanishDict

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

"Ven is the imperative for tú" -- this is only partially true. For whatever reason, in spanish the 'tú' imperative form is different depending on whether you're using it positively ("Come here") or negatively (Don't come here). When used negatively, spanish verbs use their subjunctive form. I wish they didn't :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SyamkumarR
SyamkumarR
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So in case of imperative should "tengas" be with negative forms. Why is it here.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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Ven is the command. Tengas isn't a command, so it's not in the imperative.

http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/courses/PERSUAD1.HTM Scroll to 'adverbial clauses.' I think this is the category that tener falls in for this sentence, so I think that's why tener is in the subjuctive.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

"positive tú 'ven', not 'vengas'" for two reasons. If 'venir' were regular, positive tú would be 'viene,' not 'vengas.' Since it is an irrelgular verb, it's 'ven' for no other reason than "that's just what it is."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hesolomon

Shouldn't this translate to: "They see when you have time?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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No. "ven" is the imperative of venir.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AaronDandr
AaronDandr
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"You come when you have time" it is wrong, why?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

That kind of removes the 'imperative' from the translation. In English when giving a command we don't explicitly state the subject pronoun. "You come when you have time" is just stating a matter-of-fact. This is something that you do: you come when you have time. You may be confusing it with something like "You! Come here!" where you're specifying the person you're commanding. Hope this helps.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/msquaredb

The ustedes form of the command is used but the tu form of tener is used? Why wouldn't they match? Presumably the verbs are talking about the same person/group.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

Venir is irregular, unfortunately. 'Ven' is the tu form

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/msquaredb

Let me make sure I have this right:

Formal commands are the same as the usted form of the subjunctive conjugation and informal commands are the tu form of the present indicative, right? So not only is venir irregular in the subjunctive (for formal commands) but it also has a further irregular informal command because it isnt just "vienes"? Wow

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

When regular, all imperative/command forms are the same as subjunctive, except the "positive" tu form, which is the same as the 3rd person (el/ella/usted) present indicative.

So what that means is if 'venir' was regular the singular informal imperative would be "viene," not "vienes." Keep in mind that 'viene' itself is irregular. Regular would be "vene." ;)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissSpell
MissSpell
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just an addendum to eshewans's great explanation.

"When regular, all imperative/command forms are the same as subjunctive, except the 'positive' tú form" and the 'positive' vosotros form.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillDeak

Why should cuando have an accent here? It is not a question, simply a supposition.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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Mine today 19/Aug/2015 does NOT have an accent. It must have been corrected.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DGamser

Why is English subjunctive incorrect? If I am not wrong (English is not my native tongue), that would be: "Come when you had time", and not "Come when you have time" which was marked as only one correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/.Christian.
.Christian.
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Hello DGamser, Not exactly, there's only one correct possible answer for this example:

  • -Come when you have time = Ven cuando tengas tiempo --- Tengas = It's in present not in past.

  • -Come when you had time = Ven cuando tuviste/tenías/tuvo tiempo --- That doesn't make sense nowhere, neither Spanish nor English.

I hope this help if there're question or mistakes please comment.

Greetings and luck.

Bye.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deltalon
deltalon
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Why isn't the following rule applied here: "The affirmative informal (tú) commands use the present indicative Ud. form" ?

I don't understand why 'ven' is used here instead of 'viene' as the rule dictates.

Is this an exception or is this not a strict 'rule'?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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It is breaking that rule because venir is irregular, and doesn't follow the rule.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Null-A
Null-APlus
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Is the subjunctive compulsory here? I thought cuando implied the use of the indicative mood only ? (Cuando tienes, cuando tendrás, etc.).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Laragazza215994

Yes Julian,it's compulsory. If you say cuando tienes, you are stating a fact. Therefore, you use the indicative. I.e, solamente vienes cuando tienes hambre (You only come by when you're hungry).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gordonwk

Bit mean marking listening rxercise wrong when the only problem was the accent on cuando

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marycpa

I am so glad that when I am flat out stumped by a sentence in Duo the "discussions"section shows it to be a truly complicated introduction of a Mystery Verb Tense or something equally baffling. At first glance, I thought this sentence combined verb forms for both "they" & "you!" Then I remembered the lesson was 'the Imperative..."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ssophd
ssophd
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I find it easy to translate these sentences. I know when to use subjunctive and imperative but it is hard to use the two when speaking. SO many things to memorize

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AGoldstein221

I put in "you come when you will have time" shouldn't this be accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andreaja69
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No, that's not how it is said, in either English or Spanish. 'Tengas' is present tense - subjunctive in Spanish, not in English.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/G_toe
G_toe
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Why is this subjunctive

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Erin_colgan
Erin_colgan
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When do you use the subjunctive and what is it?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleBotten
KyleBotten
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"come when you will have time" have time is the best translation and is not accepted... in that case it should be "ven cuando tienes tiempo"...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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'come when you will have time' kind of looks ok on paper, however when one speaks it out loud, we will find it is VERY awkward English. I believe you are thinking it is a future event and the English future tense should be used. Not so!

Also it is important to remember that here on Duo (or other resources) we should not be concerned with English but instead concentrate on how to say it in Spanish. English is a very powerful language and the same thought can be conveyed in many ways, where as Spanish CAN BE more formal conventional.

As a side note, if you personally use 'come when you will have time' in your daily speech, you will have to remember that in Spanish the future subjunctive is basically dead and no longer used, so the present subjunctive is used in Spanish. Also we do not use it in English future either in this sentence, as we use the simple present indicative tense 'have'.

3 years ago