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"Su pluma es mejor que la mía."

Translation:His pen is better than mine.

0
5 years ago

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Apeksha21

la mia is mine? eh?

21
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

This confused me, too. Both "mio" and "el mio" become "mine" in English, but Spanish alters the word to reflect its grammatical usage. Apparently "mio/a" without the article is a possessive adjective. For example, in "Este libro es mio," the word "mio" describes whose book it is. Adding an article makes "mio/a" a possessive pronoun. For example, in "El mio es rojo," the phrase "el mio" takes the place of the unstated item, which might be my paper, my car, my cup, etc. (http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/mio)

In this Duolingo sentence, "el mio" acts as a pronoun because it replaces "my pen." In case it helps you think of the word as a pronoun, notice that it starts a clause with an unstated verb: "Her pen is better than mine (is)," which is similar to "Mine is red." I hope this helps you!

(Despite having discovered this, I'm sure it'll still take me a while to use "mine" correctly and consistently in Spanish! Practice should make it more natural.)

172
Reply214 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

Thank you for this. I love how you can always come to the discussions with a question about something within the example sentence and find that it has been asked and answered. Usually in a thorough manner.

fantastico! Have a lingot!

edit: lol 25 likes and no lingots given... here have 5 more.

15
Reply44 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Hey, give mitaine56 a couple of lingos too! ;)

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

I show you my pen and I say : esta pluma es mía, but if I look on the table where are many pens and I finally find mine and I'll say : esta pluma es la mía. That's the difference

10
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

mitaine56, I got the impression that it's plain "mía" when the word acts as an adjective (describing a stated noun, such as "pluma" in your examples), and "la mía" when the word acts as a pronoun and subject in its own right (such as "Está es la mía" or "Su pluma es mejor que la mía." --The latter sentence looks misleading, but the noun "pluma" acts as the subject of the first clause while the pronoun "la mia" acts as the subject of the second clause). In both of your examples, however, "pluma" acts as the subject, so I don't believe one would ever say "Esta pluma es la mía."

(Can anyone more proficient confirm whether or not this is correct?)

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

athalia2- In the dictionary, hay exemples. este libro es mío. Un amigo mío ( adjective, possessive) / a friend of mine. This pen is mine / esta pluma es la mía (pronoun, possessive). Pluma is a noun, not a pronoun and is a subject in, esta pluma es mía. After a definite article (la) mía is a possessive pronoun. In this case la mía is a complement. Go and see in reverso.net. http://www.reverso.net/translationresults.aspx?lang=FR&direction=francais-espagnol you'll see that you can say esta pluma es la mía.

7
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hucklebeary

Hmmm... I thought things were clear for me after reading Athalia's initial post but, well, that kind of muddied the waters yet again lol... thanks mitaine :p

3
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

Thanks, mitaine56--I got some of my terms crossed, which I hope I've now corrected. >< I checked out your link and saw the examples. Unfortunately, the site doesn't explain why "la" is used, so now I feel more confused than I was before. Do you know anyplace that better explains when to use the article "la" with "mía" and when not to? Or is it one of those things that doesn't have a rule, per se, but one has to memorize instances or exceptions?

1
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

Thanks for finding that, mitaine56! The info on definite articles helped.

1
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelMac940705

Guess it's a time for a trip to OfficeMax

0
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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laa’ is mine for a single feminine possession, ‘elo’ single masculine, ‘lasas’ and ‘losos’ for plural.

12
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeRocaRoja87

mia/mio is mine when using it to describe an object. add the article la/el when used as the object itself. (means more like: the one that is mine)

e.g. la pluma es mia = the pen is mine el mio es largo = mine is small

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mindeeforman

More common for pen is "boligrafo" or "lapisero." "Pluma" is most often feather.

10
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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I think it depends on the country. In México, "pluma" is the preferred word for "pen." And in México the word for "pencil" is "lápiz."

14
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jkomsky

Agreed, which is why I reported an error when it counted "quill" as a wrong translation. I'm not a native speaker though, so is there an argument that can be made regarding pluma NOT being a quill here?

2
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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The word ‘pluma’ is also used for “fountain pen”.

6
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joehhendrickson

Yes. This is the distinction that I understood. boligrafo is ball point and pluma is fountain.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maricleshappen

I wrote "fountain pen" instead of pen and lost a heart. Grrr.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rooseveltnut1
rooseveltnut1Plus
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I learned pluma for pen 50 years ago and I'm stickin' with it.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linguismo

The mia (sorry for lack of accent) is it feminised for the 'la pluma' rather than owner? Same like nuestro/nuestra?

4
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mindeeforman

Yes, exactly.

7
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/josh.ramirez500
josh.ramirez500
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el mío or la mía, the best english translation i can offer is "...the one that is mine" this concept is always uttered in spanish

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Henrygb2
Henrygb2
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Better still in English might be "my one"

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/howcheng
howcheng
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Someone has a bit of pen envy, I see.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RianZafe

Pen envy.

3
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomassaurus

Penvy?

3
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PolinaDvor

I believe "...than my one" is the same as "...than mine", isn't it?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

"My one" does not mean the same as "mine." First, "mine" is not always singular as "one" is--for example, we could say "That cookie/those cookies are more burnt than mine (is/are)." Second, "my one" often sounds awkward as a replacement for "mine" unless a person means to emphasize "one" as opposed to another number. For example, "She has fewer chocolate chips in her three cookies than I have in my one (cookie)." I hope that helps!

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jomomorgan

I really wanted to believe that this sentence was a snippet from a discussion on the relative plumage of its participants. Apparently it is not.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Z-Rabbit
Z-Rabbit
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Why "la mia" instead of just "mia"?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Not everything will translate well. Think of the Spanish version as being more like "Her pen is better than (that which is) mine - the "la" represents the "that which is" part

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Esperanza_Rising

How can you tell if "Su" is masculine or feminine?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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You can only tell by context.

su = his/her/their/your/its

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BAMR03

I thought pluma was feather

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

"Pluma" has more than one meaning: feather, pen, faucet... Without context, "pen" seems most likely, but I imagine DL would/should also accept "feather" as a possible translation.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Same word. Multiple meanings. People used to use feathers as pens.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

Geese and porcupines, modern and ancient have had and continue to have quills. There is nothing antiquated about the word. Now if you said "floppy disk" is antiquated I might agree.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

It's not the word that's antiquated, but the use of quills as pens. :) Most modern calligraphers use superior metal nibs--or for Asian styles, a brush.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Devinin

I'm an idiot...I went over 'mia' a million times before and still I spelled it milla when I heard it.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrancisBeran

que means what and than???

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ranfan12

Just when you think you know what Que it means

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Harinderchahal1

Su pluma may be translated as her pen or your pen, but it is marked wrong, which may be considered

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElijahGibson1

Do you think duolingo is talking about Percy Jackson?

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/preetiaror13

How her pin is incorrect silly

0
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertDuke

Her pen is better than mine .... marked wrong... his

0
Reply1 month ago