1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Italian
  4. >
  5. "Il tuo fidanzato non è parti…

"Il tuo fidanzato non è particolarmente forte."

Translation:Your boyfriend is not particularly strong.

May 19, 2013

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silkwarrior

looks like more Italian brutal directness/rudeness to me - what are they going to pick holes in next - call that a car? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeanG6

Your comment is similar to my thinking. Is it Italian to be brutally rude like this, I wonder? The last sentence that they gave us that was similar to this was, "she is relatively pretty".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silkwarrior

Hi dean, in my experience (drawn from folks i know in sardinia) italians can be very matter of fact direct on matters to do with physical appearance, weight etc, in ways that many brits would find downright rude. I see it as the flip/dark side of the italian concern for looking good/creating a good impression/"bella figura". There are definitely neurotic limiting aspects to "bella figura" in general IMHO though I tend to think the sards are less prone to its extremes than italians in general.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kurzebingo

what makes it weirder is that lots of italians seen on the street seem...fragile? I'm 193cm/96kg who lifts weights and most of Italians seem scrawny...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DigitalMuaddib

This sentence is super catty. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ninaofthenorth

like "your friend became fat." :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ackworth

Following on from my previous comment I now realise that fidenzato refers to dating or engaged friends- sorry!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2548

It's actually a close relative of the French "fiancé", although Italians make a much more liberal use of it compared to English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/birkos

I was marked wrong for putting fiancé although the french word is used commonly in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica
Mod
  • 2548

Yes, apparently the word was only accepted without accent; being a loanword both spellings are correct. It's fixed now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nonna602151

Could it also be interpreted as "Your engagement isn't particularly strong," I wonder? --Meaning, "I doubt ot will last"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jae633849

Ma tuttavia potrebbe picchiare un piccolo gufetto, Duo, quindi guardati le spalle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Erica750551

In reference to all those asking if this rudeness is an Italian thing, this seems more like a Duo phrase than an Italian one to me. Would we also then ask whether Italians have a lot of ants in their sugar or only talk about beans in the singular?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glenis177846

I agree.Ive always found the Italians quite charming.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ninaofthenorth

Or that they have a national obsession with penguins.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeanG6

Sounds like another back-handed insult. This isn't typical of the Italian language is it? I doubt it but it's funny that a second example came up again. The other one was, "she is relatively pretty".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CinnamonBoy

Voi italiani usate "particolarmente" molto là in Italia, vero??? XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amiryosif1

surer he is not simone zaza???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thejoelsder

partner should be accepted. It is interchangeable with boyfriend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pleijaden94

Tu invece, come sei forte! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jml646982

Let's be frank....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GirlRedE

No offense, but...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ackworth

Boy friend and boyfriend depend on whether the male friend is in the dating stage or merely a boy who happens to be a friend - use of boy friend was my choice to give the idea that the boy is only a friend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angeluzfun

If he's not strong then he's not my boyfriend...

Learn Italian in just 5 minutes a day. For free.