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"El vestido llega hasta las rodillas."

Translation:The dress reaches down to the knees.

5 years ago

56 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

I wrote "the dress is knee-length." I couldn't think of any other way to say this. And it didn't specify whose dress it was, just the dress. Rejected. I didn't report it because I'm not confident enough in this translation to do so.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bobtackett

I said "the dress goes to the knees" and it was accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aidan8
aidan8
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I said "the dress comes to the knees" and it was not accepted. What exactly is it trying to say - since ther is no translation shown

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdhicks1
cdhicks1
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hasta also = up to. Which I put and was penalized. (sigh)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Well, a dress generally arrives at your knees from above; so you'd want "down to", not "up to". If they were knee-high socks or boots, then "up to" would make sense. :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ying56

Your right and Spanishdict confirms it http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/llegar (indicando distancia, nivel) llegar a o hasta to come up to

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Your link has both:
el agua me llegaba hasta las rodillas the water came up to my knees;
el vestido le llega hasta los pies the dress comes o goes down to her feet

And the RAE just says
6. intr. Tocar, alcanzar algo. La capa llega a la rodilla.

So really it seems like in Spanish llegar hasta generally means 'reaches or touches' a certain point or distance. The whole comes up / goes down thing is just English convention, and it's all a matter of perspective really, so they should both be accepted - there's no translation error or loss of meaning, even if one sounds better to you

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Re: telemetry's comment (which I can't reply to directly because it's nested too deeply): "Hasta" in Spanish can be used in many situations where we would use "up to" in English. However, in this context, "up to" is wrong in English.

If you want to talk about fashion trends, you might say that the hemlines of dresses, in general, are rising and have reached the knee. But if you're talking about the dress, a specific dress, it's not good English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnneZahra

Your answer should have been marked correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/J9Z
J9Z
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"The dress comes to the knees" was accepted, 6-2-14.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/babybrotherangel

The dress comes to the knees . was accepted 7/24/14. To me it was the most natural.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteveVan

I said the same and it was accepted, so perhaps they changed it. "reaches to the knees" should be accepted as well

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/el-Canguro

I put ".... comes up to the knees" and it was rejected .... 19 April 2014

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

It would seem that this is a big gray area with the English language, but I would argue that the hem of a dress does not "come up to" anywhere - hems of dresses go down to a part of the body.

If this example were socks (which are pulled up)"comes up to" might make sense.

But I think the "direction" they are looking for is "down" or "toward" but definitely not up

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth0

I agree. All the dresses I wear go down to (or reach to) whatever point they go down to. lol I can't even picture someone saying "comes up to" when talking about something like that. A dress hangs down (from the shoulders), unlike something like socks which are held up (by the legs).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

I put "the dress comes to the knees" and it was accepted, 04/17/14

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnneZahra

Your translation is correct. A native English speaker would say "knee length". I got it wrong too and it's because I gave the same answer.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Just report anything you think is correct - that's what it's there for! Duo can't automatically catch every possible translation that conveys the same meaning, so it needs tweaking manually.

If the correct answer is effectively saying the same thing as your answer, but yours got rejected, give it a try. The worst that can happen is they end up rejecting it

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aidan8
aidan8
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that is probably the best and most succinct translation Daniel-in-BC - report it

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/InfamousMrSatan
InfamousMrSatan
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You were correct. I gave the same answer and got it wrong. I reported it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

There are a LOT of valid translations for this, but the most literal way of translating it, "The dress reaches to the knees," would be pretty weird for English. "The dress is knee-length," definitely strikes me as more natural.

I think that if you wanted to emphasize that the dress is either big or small for the person wearing it -- like, you've already established that it's supposed to be a short dress that barely covers the thighs, but a 10 year old is playing dress up with it -- then you might say, "El vestido le llega hasta las rodillas." The dress reaches her knees. The dress reaches the knees on her. (Though now I'm having trouble deciding whether it should be "le" or "la". Hmm.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mrsmodular

The same here. I think that's how english people would say this.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jon194959

I also answered this way and was marked wrong. I think it should be accepted.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thepkl

I translated this as, The dress reaches my knees, and they marked it wrong. So if I wanted to say, the dress reaches my knees, how would I say it?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

"El vestido me llega hasta las rodillas", this "me" means "a mí" :]

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Do you know if that's a direct or indirect object? In a comment I just posted above, I was trying to decide, if I wanted to say, "The dress reaches her knees," would I want "le" or "la"...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

I assume "a ella" is an indirect object? This has never been my forte, sorry, but I can tell you that it sure needs to be "le llega", so I guess it is indirect and the direct object is "el vestido" even if it is also the subject?

Someone else can help us understanding this?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Wordreference has llegar hasta as a compound form for "reach, get to", and llegar is a transitive verb in that sense, so "the knees" would be the direct object of the verb, surely? The dress isn't reaching something else, for or to the knees (which would be the indirect object sense).

For aurosharman's sentence I'd just wang a sus in there. El vestido llega hasta sus rodillas, or llega hasta las rodillas de ella if you like. Really you're just adding a possessive sense to the direct object, not adding an indirect object in as an extra target

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

In the English structure "reaches her knees", "knees" is a direct object, but once you throw the preposition in, the whole prepositional phrase is a modifier, and the body part is not itself really the object. If you have a clitic pronoun, specifying whose body you're talking about, then that person is the object.

In "Ella me tocó la mejilla," the structure is (arguably, depending on whether you believe Spanish clitics are pronouns, or actually more like inflection particles) more similar to, "She touched me on the cheek," than, "She touched my cheek." In the latter version, "cheek" is the D.Obj. and "my" is a modifier of that noun. In the former, "me" is the D.Obj. and "on the cheek" is a modifier of the verb. (I got a degree in linguistics, and worked a decade using it in the tech sector. Mostly multi-language text-entry software, but also some speech recognition, document analysis, other stuff.)

Using "sus" here just kinda sounds un-Spanish... The clitic + def. article construction is what I've heard from native speakers in the vast majority of cases where a body part would get mentioned.

I guess the one problem is that although llegar does have a transitive form (see here: http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/llegar ), that form is more like "to unite, to join, to bring together." Possibly this usage of it is required to be intransitive. In which case, I guess the only option would just be to specify whose knees we're talking about with a possessive...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Can't reply directly but thanks for the detail! If you've mostly heard that kind of construction from native speakers then I'd go with that every time, the sus idea was just my intuition.

Going by your reasoning, wouldn't it be la then? The person is the direct object - and if they were the IO and you used le, what would be the implied DO?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Telemetry, in response to the Direct / Indirect question -- the question is whether "me llega a las rodillas" is parallel to "me tocó la mejilla" or not. If it is, then yeah, it's a direct object, and in the case of a third-person object we'd have "la".

However, the presence of the "hasta" confuses the parallel. Perhaps it's more similar to: Ella les contó la historia (a ellos). She told the story to them. (The "a" there would be a preposition, not personal.)

Anyways, I'm still not sure. what the answer is. I need to find myself a native speaker locally who's amenable to being asked this kind of thing on a regular basis...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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I used "The dress reaches the knees" and it was accepted, but I was thinking "her knees".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aristotlefan

It does not accept "her knees." Confusing.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Wouldn't that be sus rodillas?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Could be, but it's more common in Spanish to use a pronoun, and then the definite article on the body part. See Babella's example above.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wanhm
Wanhm
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DL says 'duele le homro' refers to my shoulder but now 'las rodillas' is the knees. How confusing?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth0

No, it's "me duele el hombro" that means "my shoulder hurts." Literally, "the shoulder hurts me" so that's the context that shows it's talking about my shoulder (because you wouldn't feel anybody else' shoulder hurting). "Te duele el hombro" would mean "your shoulder hurts." However, in this sentence, there is no context that shows the knees are my knees or your knees or his or hers. "El vestido me llega hasta las rodillas" would specify that the dress reaches my knees.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wanhm
Wanhm
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Thanks Elizabeth. Your explanation is very helpful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dberthold

I used "extends to the knees," which you might consider as an alternative to "reaches to."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mmx11
mmx11
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Me too, but it was marked as wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Harbinger91

What function does "hasta" serve in this construction?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

"as far as" or "down to"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

It's a preposition of direction or motion.

I kind of think of "hasta" and "desde" as being stronger versions of "a" and "de". The shorter words generally gesture at the idea of looking toward a destination or an origin; the longer words more strongly suggest a flow of motion toward or from something. By using "hasta" here, you're describing the way the fabric flows down to a specific point (the knee).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carolebell

No, knee-length is correct, as is "the dress comes to the knees." I don't think it's colloquial.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr.Beez
Dr.Beez
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The verb we'd usually use in English is "fall." "The dress falls to the knee." However, with no hearts left, I wasn't about to test such an idiomatic translation, and stuck with a more literal one.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

1) I thought body parts use the articles(El/La/Las/Los) and they translate the same as Su/Sus/etc...To sum up, I wrote "The dress comes to MY legs" and was marked incorrect. Why? 2) If i wanted to write "The dress reaches my legs", could i say "The vestido alcanza hasta las rodillas."?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elizabeth0

1) Because there's nothing in the sentence that gives us any reason to be able to specify it's referring to "my knees."

2) (Taking from Babella's comment :) ) "El vestido me llega/alcanza hasta las rodillas." = The dress reaches my knees. However, I think that your sentence would work if there was some context around that made it obvious that "las rodillas" are referring to yours only. But if there is no context that makes it obvious, you would need to add the "me" before the verb. That's what I'm thinking at least.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heavenly899091

The dress reaches the knees was accepted. 12/02/2014

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/newbaconings
newbaconings
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Why isn't "reaches to the knee" accepted?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rockseed
Rockseed
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I would use knee rather than knees when talking about how long a dress is -- as a native English speaker. Duo marked wrong. Will report.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lafe55
lafe55
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I thought a major component of this lesson is that in Spanish body parts generally require definite articles whereas on English we are more likely to use a possessive pronoun. So I put the dress reaches her knees and it was marked wrong. If you start with the thought in English, it would seem like the Spanish sentence here would be the correct way to express it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clarkeve

Gettin' some religion statements on here aren't we? Well, that's okay as long as I don't have to wear a dress that goes down to my ankles... whatevs... :p

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheAwesomeClair

In this world, that's an accomplishment, and a floor-length dress (like I wear whenever I have to wear a dress) is unheard-of

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TibbytheCa

the dress arrives until the knees, is what i put, wow spanish is messed up, too many alternate meanings.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keyboardo

From which direction?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/powergary
powergary
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I put the dress reaches until the knees and was marked wrong hasta means until to me.

1 year ago