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https://www.duolingo.com/Resonance2001

Strange masculine, singular forms

I don't know if it helps but I have noticed that the masculine, singular forms are irregular in certain groups. We all know that -o is usually a masculine letter, -a feminine and -s for the plural:

el, la, los las (el is not like the others) also the related aquél, aquélla, etc. (and the ones without the accent)

From uno: un, una, unos, unas (and alguno, ninguno) Strange one:un

este, esta, estos, estas: (remove the 't' for translating 'that': ese, esa etc...) este is the masculine, singular (esto is neuter)

So I suppose if you remember the masculine singular one, then the rest should be easier to work out just by putting on regular endings.

4 years ago

5 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cooooooooolkkkkk

are you in america

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Resonance2001

No. I live in England.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cooooooooolkkkkk

oh no wonder you are still awake

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IETBAtotalk

Hi.

That's right, there are masculine words which do not finish at -o. For example, nouns ended at -ista: "un taxista" and "una taxista" (a male taxi driver and a female taxi driver).

However, I would not connect aquel/aquella/aquellos/aquellas with el/la/los/las despite having similar endings. In Spain we call them "determinantes demostrativos" (If they have a "tilde" -an accent-, they are pronouns instead of determiners). There are three types to show a distance in time or space:

1) Near: este/esta/estos/estas.

2) Intermediate distance (That/those are often translated as these): ese/esa/esos/esas.

3) Long distance: aquel/aquella/aquellos/aquellas.

There are also neuter singular pronouns: esto, eso and aquello. They do not have an accent (tilde) since there are not determiner versions to be distinguished from. The rest of these pronouns are: éste/ésta/éstos/éstas, ése/ésa/ésos/ésas and aquél/aquélla/aquéllos/aquéllas.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Resonance2001

Oh yes, I know about el/aquel etc, it is just that I mean the endings are the same. I am just showing that in different parts of speech, the masculine singular ones are the ones with an irregular pattern

4 years ago