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"Tú eres una maestra."

Translation:You are a teacher.

5 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BrettRyland

Why is "You are a master." not also allowed as a correct answer? "Master" is given as one of the translations of "maestra".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nokkenbuer

"Master" may be the literal translation of "maestro" (from Latin), but it is being used in the sense of "schoolmaster", so teacher is more accurate. Anyway, almost never is "master" used with an indefinite article in either language. It is either "the master" or "Master" as a title, but rarely ever "a master".

In many cultures, the teacher or educator is often referred to as a master by the student, since ideally it would be a master of that which is being taught who is teaching the novice.

EDIT: However, after thinking about it some more, not enough information is provided to know the correct sense of the word, so "master" should also be accepted. Also, master can be used with an indefinite article on some occasions, such as in "He is a master of deception."

"Él es un maestro del engaño."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MissRichie

Why do they use the article here when they didn't use it before doctor in the other question?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sebmtk
sebmtk
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Why is it "soy maestro" but not "tú eres maestra?" Or is it an either/or thing?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Galdwin

maestro - male teacher, maestra - female teacher

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerraZe
TerraZe
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I think they are talking about the lack of indefinite article and not the difference between male and female if I read that correctly. If they didn't ask that, I will. Why did one lesson drop the indefinite article "soy maestro", yet here it has it?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

The indefinite article is explained at http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/7 and http://spanish.about.com/od/adjectives/a/indefinite.htm.

Essentially, professions and the like do not require an article in Spanish as they do in English except when the profession is described by adjectives. ...thus, perhaps this Spanish sentence is wrong to use the "una." (?)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TerraZe
TerraZe
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Thank you.

Did you mean "an" in the sentence you used? Because it's good there.

If you mean in the sentence for the lesson, the indefinite article ("a") is necessary here. If you were to say "you are teacher", it would sound odd and would be incorrect English... given the links you provided, I think you probably already know that.

Oh, one sentence in the first link: "he is a Catholic" isn't wrong, but here we would say "He is Catholic" using "Catholic" as an adjective. People here capitalize the adjective when referring to the religion to distinguish it from the other meaning even though I've never seen it used for anything else except as an example.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

Sorry, I meant "una" rather than "an." Getting my languages mixed up... :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/midnight27

I love how this is a statement. It's not a question. The speaker is telling this lady that she is a teacher. I think that this statement would be followed by something like, "And there is nothing you can do about it."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eriklover555

I have a question - what's the does the gender matter in the abstract? Like, if you were talking about a teacher in general, what gender do you use?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/--shaun--

Generally male is the default, but you could use either (I am fairly sure, but not positive - if someone wants to confirm)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nokkenbuer

I believe masculine is usually assumed when no additional information is provided (cf. "ellos" and "nosotros"). Unless you know the gender of the teacher and no other rules apply, it is assumed to be male. That is how most things work in masculine languages like Spanish.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/onurcan2

What is the difference between "tu es" and "tu eres"... the latter formal?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/--shaun--

In a word 'No'. There are 3 parts here: "Tú", "es" and "eres" : "Tú" - is used for You(informal) : "es" is used for He/She/It/You(formal) : and "eres" is used for You(informal).
You can say "Tú eres" - which would mean you(inf) are. One would not say "Tú es", as you would be mixing formal and informal in the same sentence talking to the same person.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DianaCarutasu

Thanks for the explanation! :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GRoppolo1

"es" is used with "él", "ella", "usted", or a name; while "eres" is only supposed to be used with "tú". "Tú" is informal, and "usted" is formal.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aoife1011

My spanish teacher has always used profesor (pronounced pro-fe-sore) for a male teacher or profesora for female. Is this not also correct?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ckm8

So I guess that maestra is feminie or masculan depending on the gender of the actual person?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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No! No! No! El maestro (masc) La maestra (fem). Some professions change like this one does, i.e. -o and -a. Others use the same word but you would treat them differently if you know the gender of the person eg using el/un or la/una, making an adjective gender specific, etc

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carlos_Belda
Carlos_Belda
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Maestra or profesora is more or less the same

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nokkenbuer

Well, "maestro" means teacher or (in certain cases) master. "Profesor" and its feminine counterpart is usually used with professors in particular. They are similar, but not synonymous.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CesarJericho

In Latin America We Say: Maestra = Primary School - and - High School Profesora = For the University

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AchilleTal

Don't get me wrong, I love the site but sometimes I just wanna [censor]. 'Professor' is not good? Come on!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nokkenbuer

See my comment above about why "profesor" is not a synonym of "maestro" in most circumstances.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpaceCow1

I thought professora or proffesor was teacher

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

"Maestra/o" and "profesora/o" and "catedrática/o" all mean "teacher." According to Spanishdict.com, "maestra/o" seems to refer to a primary school teacher, and "profesora/o" and "catedrática/o" to a secondary school/university teacher.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GRoppolo1

No, it's like a college professor or something

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leonoflondon

Can you say, "tú son maestra"? (Son instead of eres)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

No. We do say "you are" in English, but that's due to an idiosyncrasy of this language; "you" can be singular OR plural, yet we always use a plural verb with it. Spanish has separate forms for the singular and plural "you": "tú" and "usted" are always singular, while "ustedes" is always plural. Thus, when using the verb "ser," "tú" will take "eres," "usted" will take "es," and "ustedes" will take "son." See http://www.spanishdict.com/conjugate/ser for a full conjugation chart. I hope that clarifies it for you. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leonoflondon

Yes this is very useful, thank you :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mnmelamed

Instructor is no good?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nokkenbuer

I believe instructor is still "instructor" in Spanish. They are similar terms, but the best and most common translation of "maestro" is "teacher".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheDrWho

thank you now what is the pi of a circle

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TXShawn40
TXShawn40Plus
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Rolling the "r" in "rey" I can do, but for a "tr" like "maestra" my tongue just won't cooperate!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaZeduhh

exactly my point its annoying

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/M_Schuhler

I may be looking into this too much, but shouldn't it be "Usted" instead of "Tu"? I was taught that you always use formality with people like teachers and elders.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Athalia2

The speaker may be a family member, friend, or another teacher, in which case "tú" would be appropriate.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tinkerbell927108

Why is it when I have to speak for the man, I ALWAYS get at least one word wrong? But, for the woman, I get it right???

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abwickerpunch

Como supiste?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hollywood210

Teacher should be "profesor/profesora" shoukdnt it??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanTheYoutuber

No i am not a teacher.

1 year ago