Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Ik heb een badkamer nodig."

Translation:I need a bathroom.

4 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/StevenE4

I wrote "I need to use a bathroom." Shouldn't that be the same?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 126

No, in Dutch we're not afraid to actually say toilet or wc, if somebody talks about the badkamer they actually mean the thing with een bad, een douce en een wc (a bath, a shower and a toilet), not a substitute for toilet. If somebody would say Mag ik de badkamer gebruiken? I would expect them to take a shower.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arturo_Z
Arturo_Z
  • 18
  • 14
  • 11
  • 9
  • 5

In The Netherlands, the toilet and the rest of the bathroom are separated so Susande is right

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dmfarley

In some parts of the Netherlands this is only sometimes true.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nierls
Nierls
  • 10
  • 10
  • 3
  • 2

For most parts of the Netherlands there's a seperate toilet and a toilet in the bathroom

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alphathon

The same is true here in the UK - we don't ask to use the bathroom when we need to use the toilet. Neither do we use "little boy's/girls room".

That's not to say we don't use euphemisms ("convenience" is one, while "to powder my nose" is used to mean "going to (use) the toilet") but most people just say toilet in all but the most polite of circumstances.

The only time we'd generally say "bathroom" here is when asking where it is in someone else's house, since the bathroom is usually where the toilet is. We'd still say "Can I use your toilet?" or something to that effect to ask permission.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OmaJennie

What? Not "Where's the loo?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenjaminWeber1

Only in parts of Victorian London ;)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markvanments

Disagree. I think British people of an older generation WOULD ask to use the bathroom as a euphemism for going the the toilet.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alphathon

Oh euphemisms are absolutely used, particularly by older/posher people, but in my experience bathroom doesn't tend to be one of them, or at least not in restaurants etc (i.e. where there no bath). It's at least uncommon enough that when bathroom is used to mean a room with only toilets/sinks it comes across as conspicuously American (as do little boy's/girl's room and restroom). In fact, the "room with a toilet (but no bath/shower)" definition is listed by Wiktionary as chiefly US, by Oxford as North American, by Collins as [US] and by Chambers as especially N Amer

Loo, lavatory, WC, facilities etc are all more common among the posh/polite, while toilet(s), bog(s), lav(s) etc are more often used in other social circles. It's certainly possible that bathroom is used like that by some people or in some places, but I have yet to come across it and it is seemingly absent from the media.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markvanments

My father (British) tells a story from years ago (when it was still possible to mend your own car) that he arrived at a house with his hands covered in oil and grime from having to do something to the car. He asked for the bathroom and was shown the toilet which, of course, did not have a washbasin and soap - which was what he really needed to wash all the oil off his hands.

For a more recent example, here is a headline from the Daily Mail in 2015: "Why CANT you stop going to the bathroom after a few drinks?"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidLamb3
DavidLamb3
  • 25
  • 24
  • 16
  • 375

No, this is not normal in British English. Most people tend to say "toilet" or "Loo", Using "bathroom" to mean "toilet" is something that seems to be heard more in American English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DieFlabbergast
DieFlabbergast
  • 14
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 280

Which older generation would that be? I'm 68 and I've only ever heard this expression from Americans. In Britain, the most common word used to be lavatory, which then gave way to toilet. Bathrooms are for baths or showers.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/p8c
p8c
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 40

ah, so is "need" (as translated) means something like "to use" rather than something like "i need to build or add a bathroom onto the house"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 126

I'd say Ik heb een badkamer nodig would normally mean you need to build this room onto the house. It could also mean you need to take a shower, but it would be an odd way of saying it, something like ik moet douchen (I have to take a shower) sounds more natural.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OmaJennie

Now, you have confused me. What do you mean by "the other way around"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 126

I also don't know what I tried to say months ago, so I adjusted my post. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CaitlinApril

I go along with your translation. "I need a bathroom" denotes urgency where as "I need to use the bathroom" means you would like to as soon as its convenient.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bregtje1

The emphasis in the word ''badkamer '' is wrong. should be on the first syllable.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yineanlamadim
yineanlamadimPlus
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 4
  • 4

thank you! I was wondering about that, it went against my "feel" for what sounds correct - I was wondering...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/passionfruit12
passionfruit12
  • 21
  • 20
  • 18
  • 18
  • 16
  • 15
  • 13
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 214

I have a bathroom need? What?!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alphathon

I see you are level 14 in German so presumably the concept of separable verbs isn't alien to you. I don't know if this is technically a separable verb, but it is certainly analogous, and nodig hebben can certainly be thought of as a single unit. If it is the logic of that combination that you are having trouble with then try thinking of it as "have need of" rather than simply "need".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/passionfruit12
passionfruit12
  • 21
  • 20
  • 18
  • 18
  • 16
  • 15
  • 13
  • 10
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 214

oh okay, I wasn't thinking of it like that; I was thinking of English more than German. hahaha my bad

2 years ago