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Difference lo siento/Disculpe/Perdon

Hello Is there a difference between lo siento, disculpe and perdon? Thanks :p

4 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Mister_De
Mister_De
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Well, I´m a native speaker from Spain and they are all almost the same and in most situations they are interchangable,so you don´t have to worry if you use one or another. I can´t think in a situation in which one of them wouldn´t be correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

In English I'm sorry, pardon me, and excuse me are all used somewhat differently. "I'm sorry" expresses regret, while "excuse me" and "pardon me" are mostly polite noises.

If you told me your cat died or that you broke your arm, in English I might say "I'm sorry". What would I say in Spanish? Would "Lo siento" be right or does this mean that it's my fault? ("I'm sorry" does not mean it's my fault in English, but some people treat it as if it does.) "Pardon me" or "excuse me" would be very, very strange and inappropriate.

If I accidentally broke a glass at your house, in English I would also say "I'm sorry". Again, "pardon me" and "excuse me" would be strange, though not as inappropriate.

If I need directions on the street or in a store I would say "Excuse me" or "Pardon me" when approaching you. In Costa Rica I've usually said "Perdón" but I don't know if that is right.

If you're a waiter at a restaurant and I need to get your attention from a short distance away, I would say "Excuse me". I probably would not say "pardon me," though I'm not sure why not.

If I'm trying to pass you (and would like you to get out of my way) I would say "pardon me" or "excuse me."

If I bumped you accidentally while trying to pass you, I would say "pardon me" or "excuse me" or "sorry". If I bumped you and you fell down (or dropped and broke something) I would say "I'm sorry" or "I'm so sorry", not "Excuse me" or "Pardon me." If I'm squeezing through a crowd of people and might be stepping on feet I would probably say "Sorry, sorry, sorry..." as I went.

If I did something deliberately wrong--I stole money from you or punched you in the face--I would say "I'm very sorry, can you forgive me?" or "I'm very sorry, what I did was unforgivable." "I'm sorry" alone would not be enough.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mister_De
Mister_De
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If I told you that my cat died or that I broke my arm you should say "Lo siento". "Disculpe" wouldn´t have any sense in this situation and if you said "Perdón" I would think you are the one who killed my cat!

If you accidentally broke a glass the usual thing would be to say "Lo siento" but the other options would be also correct.

If you need directions "Disculpe", "Lo siento" and "Perdone" are right.

If you need to catch the attention of a waiter you should say "Disculpe" o "Perdone", but not "Lo siento".

And well, in conclusion, you are right; I should have thought a bit more before giving an answer. "Disculpe" and "Perdone" are almost always interchangeable, and most times they can also mean the same as "Lo siento"; but you only use "Lo siento" when you feel bad about a situation.

I hope my answer is now more precise. When you are a native speaker you sometimes dont think too much about these differences haha ^^U

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/asavin
asavin
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Thanks for explanation!

P.S. That's why native speaker and good teacher are not the same usually)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boredddd
boredddd
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Thanks for your explanation!

I think the words itself also bring hints for the occasion you would use them. What I mean is the following:

'Lo' means 'it' 'siento' means 'I feel'

So, literally it means 'I feel it' which expresses emotional understanding and according to that you can think yourself in which kind of situations you would use this for example.

Maybe this helps some people to autonomously build an understanding for some words and their occasions of usage.

Peace! :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adina_atl

Thank you. It's easy in our own languages to see the big rules and forget the exceptions. I've learned things about my own language by reading the "English from Spanish" forum. In English we say something is "As clear as the nose on your face" But without a mirror you can't see the nose on your own face. A foreign language can be a mirror.

Gracias. Es facíl en su propia lengua ver las reglas grandes y olvidar las excepciones. He aprendido sobre mi propia lengua por leer "Inglés desde Español" en Duolingo. En inglés decimos que algo es "tan claro que el nariz en el rosto." Pero sin espejo se no puede ver el nariz en su propio rosto. Una lengua extraño puede ser un espejo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amapoladorada

And is there a difference between perdon and perdone?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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"perdón" is actually the noun, but it seems to be used quite often. You cannot add "me" to the noun.

"perdone" is the Imperative verb form for usted. "perdona" is the Imperative verb form for tú.
You will see "perdoneme" and "perdoname".

https://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/perdon

https://dictionary.reverso.net/english-spanish/excuse%20me

http://conjugator.reverso.net/conjugation-spanish-verb-perdone.html

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VarunBhat6

nice explanation.. :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jlhazlet

great way to phrase the question, thank you!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Absalem999

Thanks for your answer!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mister_De
Mister_De
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You are welcome! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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About the same as I'm sorry, excuse/forgive me, and pardon me. There is also excuseme. They are all just polite ways of asking to get by, or when you need to interrupt a conversation for a moment, or what you say when you accidentally bump into someone.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mister_De
Mister_De
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Oh, and you misspelled "perdon", the correct form is "perdón". I know it´s difficult but try not to forget the accent marks! :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xXfashiongamerXx

are there any more formal than the other ones maybe?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Well the "usted" forms "perdone" and "disculpe" would be considered more formal than the "tú" forms "perdona" and "disculpa", but I think that the noun form "perdón" is used anytime. In English "pardon me" sounds a bit more formal to me than "excuse me", but really either will do. There are a lot of examples in this dictionary if you scroll all the way down:. https://dictionary.reverso.net/english-spanish/excuse%20me https://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/perdon https://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/perdone https://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/disculpe https://dictionary.reverso.net/english-spanish/forgive%20me

Scroll up for more information about when to use "Lo siento." which is not used for the same situations. https://dictionary.reverso.net/spanish-english/lo%20siento

3 months ago