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  5. "Nunca va a llover."

"Nunca va a llover."

Translation:It will never rain.

August 18, 2014

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ktgwendu1

Things that are never said in England


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JonKerr

It never will rain is wrong? Come on DL!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OscarUrrego

I see it wrong too, why in that order?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tessbee

It's not as commonly used as the "It will never.." and it's putting more emphasis on the "never". It's also a style in expressing; a bit poetic, too, if I may say so, and dramatic (I like it :)) but grammatically correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HijoDePutney

'It never will...' sounds a little strange to me. 'It will never...' sounds a lot smoother.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bamdorf

Well, I am an upper midwest US speaker, and "it never will.." is perfectly all right here. It does imply a slightly greater sense of frustration (more emphasis on the never), but it is fine here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mickeymouse1955

How do you get 'will' instead of 'going to' in this example?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andreaja69

If you translate the Spanish literally, you won't get 'will' - it should be 'going to', but Duo aren't consistent with their translations of sentences in the future.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoahMische

Never will it rain...proper grammar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galletadecolores

Yes, proper grammar, but it sounds funny.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Biscuit94

Obviously, they've never been to Scotland.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BobZhurunkle

If a child is playing a cloud in the school play they might say Nunca voy a llover.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngelaOddie

You can say it in any order


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChaseYox

Why is "Never will it rain." wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bamdorf

Just my 2c as a native english speaker. It sounds awkward, perhaps useful in poetry but not normal discourse (from an english point of view, not from anything about the spanish expression). Just thought of a similar expression with the adverb so placed, which might be useful in England: "Always will it rain". Adverbs like to be near verbs, just like adjectives like to be near the noun they modify. In my admittedly messed up head.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChaseYox

Apparently Duolingo thinks otherwise


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarpoChico

It never rains in southern California.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Leslie773610

It never will rain. (should this be counted wrong?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sr.Cisne

Central Midwest spoken English would say "It never will rain...."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bamdorf

Or "it will never rain"....or more likely I think I would hear "it is never going to rain" But "Never will it rain"....Never in conversational or normal written usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rollermama

Why not "it is never goinging to rain" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/irene121212

I am a Londoner and we would say "It will never rain "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/quickdraw741

"never will it rain" has the exact same meaning.

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