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"Hoeveel dialecten worden er gesproken in Nederland?"

Translation:How many dialects are spoken in the Netherlands?

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3 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AJDerr
AJDerr
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Are the dialects within the Netherlands so distinct from each other that they inhibit, or at least make difficult, communication between speakers of each dialect? It's just crazy to me that there can be such difference within a country that's a third the size of the US state I hail from... in Pennsylvania, you can drive 300 miles away, and still understand someone 99.5% (they might call soda "pop" but that's about it.)

8
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ehollander

Remember that English was not the original language spoken in the US, but instead spread across from the east as Europeans came over and slowly moved westward. They mixed together and there was dialect leveling. (This is part of why there are more pronounced dialect/accent divides on the east coast than on the west -- think New York vs Boston vs Pittsburgh vs Atlanta, etc.) In the last couple hundred years, people have moved around America A LOT. In Europe there has been, in general, less movement of populations. People have stayed in one place a lot longer, so those accents/dialects remain somewhat unique. To compare, there is an island off of the US called Tangier Island (look up a youtube video), where the population has hardly moved from that island for a few hundred years. Their dialect is sometimes EXTREMELY difficult to understand for other Americans, and it has remained unique because they are somewhat isolated and because they've stayed in place.

Hope that helps. :)

14
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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If I speak in my dialect to someone from Amsterdam which is about 160 km in a straight line (100 miles) away they will look at me funny and will probably ask if I'm German/Belgian. Obviously the shorter the distance the more people will understand each others dialects, but even within 20km there are differences in dialect and sometimes completely different words can be used to describe the same thing.

9
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NellyF056
NellyF056
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Dan kom jij uit Limburg ;-)

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/asdrubale88

Is "er" necessary? The only thing that comes to my mind is that "er" is being a subject substitute in the sentence.

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarmFoothills

It's not necessary.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gymnastical
Gymnastical
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You will come across times when it seems useless but is really needed there so if it makes sense there I would get comfortable using it but of course if you know for sure it will change the meaning of the sentence if it's there and you don't want that, don't use it. In this case, it's what my Civics teacher would describe as colloquial but I am not sure if that's the right word.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dwarven_hydra
dwarven_hydra
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That's actually a question I'd love for someone to answer....

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidvdb
davidvdb
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3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bemk92
bemk92
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That's really difficult to determine. The question of where one dialect ends and another begins is even more vaguely defined than with languages (which happens based on mutual intelligibility) .

Depending on who's counting, you might get as few as 6 or as many as 400. Does my Oosterhout dialect differ enough from that of someone in Breda or Tilburg to be considered a different dialect? It certainly does compared to someone in Amsterdam. (Noord-Brabants cares about word word genders where standard Dutch mostly cares about either gendered or neuter, but doesn't distinguish between genders).

So how many dialects are there in the Netherlands? You tell me.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/philmander

Why "worden" and not "zijn" ?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gymnastical
Gymnastical
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While you are obviously on the right track with your learning in pointing out that zijn means are, the verb worden is used to talk about the passive (something is being done by the subject - the dinner is being cooked by me- and not the subject doing the action - I am cooking the dinner). Since we are not talking about a subject speaking x number of dialects, we don't use zijn. We are talking about the dialects being spoken.

Hope this helps

4
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krysztoff
krysztoff
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belgian dialects, always a delight :D as far as I know, in the Netherlands there is more an accent difference than actual a dialect, which implies typical regional words. I don't mention Friesland because that is something else.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Trust me if someone from "de achterhoek", Groningen or Limburg talks in their dialect to someone from Amsterdam they won't have a clue what that person is saying and that is not just down to a different accent. And being from Limburg there are even within the province words that are used in one place that are not in another as well as pronounced differently.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aurie_lehleh92
aurie_lehleh92
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Is er? Maar ik weet dat er zijn veel verscheidene dialecten in noorwegen...

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WhitneySal1

Interesting. I did not realize there were multiple dialects in The Nederlands. What dialect are we learning in this course? I'll be moving to Eindhoven soon, so I hope I won't be completely confused.

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/erikvanrosmalen
erikvanrosmalen
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You're learning 'Standaardnederlands', which means 'standard dutch', formerly referred to as 'ABN', or 'Algemeen Beschaafd Nederlands', (Generally Civilized Dutch).

Dialects, yes there are many, but don't worry: most of them are mainly difference in pronunciation and/or slight grammatical or word order differences. You'll understand 'Eindhovens' quite well I think!

One to learn is 'Houdoe' [ˈɦɑu.du], a widespread and very common goodbye greeting in Brabant!

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WhitneySal1

Dankjewel, Erik, for your fast reply!

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Reply1 year ago