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"L'assicurazione è più costosa questo mese."

Translation:The insurance is more expensive this month.

August 18, 2014

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scontrino

i wrote "costs more" why is this rejected?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aliaskirara

because you say the same concept but with anothere sentence: the insurance COSTS more this month=l'assicurazione COSTA di più questo mese (do you see? now, the verb change and all the structure of the phrase changes) ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gmrenak

Yes, I see that, but aren't we just concerned with the translation of the given Italian? Surely 'costs more' is an equivalent translation to 'is costlier' for 'e piu costosa'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gink526960

We are not concerned with the translation, we are concerned with learning grammar and syntaxes. If you change the sentence structure in order to convey the same meaning, then the exercise is pointless.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LindaMB1

shouldn't dearer be allowed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138

Not in this century. Using "dear" to refer to price is a very archaic English usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margerose1949

'dear' is still used frequently in the UK to mean more expensive. 'dearer' doesn't sound very elegant but it's not wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Laur1e

Yes, and in Australia and New Zealand. Not considered archaic at all. And the exact equivalent "cher" is even more common in French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lolologist

I feel that Duo is getting a little more Mafia-esque as time goes on...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gink526960

I guess non-italian are much more obsessed with mafia then Italian are (above all taking into consideration that 95% Italian people never gets in contact with anything related to mafia).

By the way, I don't think that anybody has ever seen any correlation between insurance and mafia.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138

"I don't think that anybody has ever seen any correlation between insurance and mafia."

One of the mafia's main activities in Sicily was (and continues to be) providing businesses with "insurance" in the form of protection payments. The mafia in the United States expanded on this and actually ran insurance scams as a regular means of making money.

Yes, most people in the northern half of Italy will never interact with the mafia. Those in the southern half are not so lucky.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lev_lafayette

È una buona protezione


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanNixon1

Dearer and more expensive are identical and both are in common usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138

"Dear[er]" is definitely not in common usage in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Val904613

what's wrong with "insurance is dearer this month"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138

Despite the (older, I assume) British people on this thread insisting that "dearer" is in common usage, it isn't. No one says this outside of Downton Abbey.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fierypink

the insurance is more pricy this month should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138
  1. I think "pricy" is technically acceptable, but the standard form of this word really is "pricey."

  2. If you wanted to say that, you'd say "pricier," not "more pricey."

  3. "Pricey" is an informal variant of "expensive," bordering on slang. I wouldn't expect DL to accept "pricey" for "costoso" in most exercises because of how much more common "expensive" is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillHazelt

perhaps you cna give clues when you want literal translatios,


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138

I don't know what kind of "clue" you were looking for here or what a figurative translation of this sentence would look like.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah501993

what is the difference between cost more and is more expensive?????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nerevarine1138

In terms of general meaning, nothing.

In terms of translation, a whole lot. Your version changes the verb and removes the adjective in the process. It's the same as translating "he is bald" as "he has no hair." Although they communicate the same meaning, they're not the same sentence.

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