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"La vida es muy corta."

Translation:Life is too short.

5 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/erezslp

and there's no time, for fussing and fighting my friend..

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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Or fretting over how the Spanish translation is different from the English.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineAnn

I said "The life is very short" I do not understand why this is wrong.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

I would say that sentence is an idiom, so a literal translation doesn't show the meaning of it.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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No idiom. The literal translation is, "Life is very short". The message that it conveys could not be any more clear. Life is short so seize the day and live each day as if it were your last. You don't live forever. One of these days you are going to die. And so on. (The term 'idiom' seems to be over-used in these comments.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

I agree. So I'm calling it a saying, or an adage, ... our a Proverb ;)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee

**or

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GrahamRawlinson

Yes, but in some places if you use the idiom it is marked wrong, so sometimes a guessing game eh?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Yes, I am afraid sometimes it is :_D

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lynne650325

Guessing or mind-reading, take your pick!

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/btownsb
btownsb
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demasiado = too, muy = very right?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mistakenolive

Demasiado means something like "too much", "too many"; an excess amount in a negative sense. Actually I'm not sure now if demasiado would work here, it might be like "too much short". IDK..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mistakenolive

Wait, I just googled it, there are plenty of results with demasiado, and with muy. I think demasiado puts more negative emphasis on the duration of life, while muy is more neutral.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_Fulvius

Not related to the topic but, people keep saying that life is too short when life is the longest thing you'll ever experience..

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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But also the shortest -- when you are at the end of it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

Interesting point, though it's length can in no way exclude someone's desire for it to be longer. You could sit in a theater and watch a 5 year long movie, but leave the theater wishing it was longer (it would have to be one HELL of a movie).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

So is this an example of DL incorrectly translating an english idiom into spanish (not using demasiada), or do they have the same idiom in spanish, but use 'muy'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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Just go with 'Life is very short'. DL changed it to 'too' in order to confuse us but don't take their bait.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jarraddixon

Wrong. Life is the longest thing you do

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryanTiams

SAD TRUTH: LIFE IS SHORT :( (please take care everyone)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lysa86
Lysa86
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I wrote "life is very brief" but it was wrong, as I'm not a native english speaker I was wondering if there's a difference between short and brief.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

In this context there is no difference, but keep in mind that "Life is too short" is something of a popular phrase in English. "Brief" means short in duration only (it can also refer to a particular kind of report). "Short" can also refer to physical length/height as well as underachieving ("Coming up short") or having insufficient funds ("I'm short on cash this month"). Brief cannot be used in these cases.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaminegg

Actually, it means the same, it's just not what we say. Like why your coffee cup needs a lid and and your soda bottle get's a cap, when they're the same thing. Only this difference is much less pronounced. Learning phrases is part of learning to communicate well, I guess!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_MrsBrown

Why use "muy" instead of "demasiado"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kaminegg

Demasiado is "too"; muy "very." If something's very short, (muy corta) you'd better use it wisely. If it's too short (demasiado corta), your only hope is to make it longer. At least that's how it looks to me! Can any native speakers or better educated tell me otherwise?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Weirdo_0
Weirdo_0
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Why didn't it accept "life is pretty short"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HIMSpanish

People typically say "Life is short." in English without the "very". I translated it as "Life is short" since that's the most appropriate translation, even though the most literal translation would be "Live is very short."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Martyn731976
Martyn731976
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It is an error

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alethea436961

What is wrong with. Life is very short . It should be accepted, as well. 4/1/2017

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EnriqueMor445575

the literal translation is actually 'life is very short', not 'too short'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Smilinsteve7256

Life is very short.....not "too" short

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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"Ars longa, vita brevis" = Art is long but life is short, Latin aphorism, I mean Roman aphorism.

7 months ago