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"¿Cierro la puerta?"

Translation:Do I close the door?

5 years ago

73 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/PartApart

I close the door?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/falloutshower

It seems Duolingo has changed the accepted answer from "I close the door?" to "Do I close the door?", but I will leave my original comment as follows: There are a lot of ways to write this sentence, in English, to fit the intended meaning. It is important to consider the context in which it is being written. I think in certain situations you could drop either "do" or "do I", and ask "I close the door?" or "Close the door?". Are we asking if a person desires that we perform this action, asking permission to perform it, or asking if this action is our responsibility to perform? Are we asking to perform this action immediately, or in general?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seveer
seveer
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I agree. It seems that "Do I..." has replaced "Shall I..." or "Should I..." in modern English usage as a request for instruction, such that in order to emphasize that we are asking whether something is happening, rather than whether it ought to happen, we might omit any of these to indicate we mean something like "Am I closing the door?" But I am not far enough along in Spanish to know if this is a correct use of this tense here, nor am I an expert on English grammar.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markbooth
markbooth
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Has it? Is that an American English thing? "Do I close the door?" sounds odd to me unless you're asking it of someone who's telling you your future, but we're doing present tense here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eham

I'm British and I would say, "Do I close the door?" or even, "Am I closing the door?" to mean "Should/shall I close the door?" Although it does sound odd when you think about it in this much detail!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ogniloud1

In Ireland we say "Will I close the door?" but duolingo says NO

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/garjay

I reported this, pretty surprised it isnt more widespread from what I see in the comments, as I'm fairly sure it's not just an iourish ting (ive lived in uk and Ireland)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScottPorter0

In Australia too, "Will I - whatever action" is an prompt to other(s) if they want me to do an action, just like Shall - but the later is almost never used here in Oz. "Will I---" is very common usage.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
Mod
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Hi, please use the button to report errors and omissions. The course creators don't read every comment to every sentence discussion, but they do get the reports. Thanks!

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/groomer2

close the door? is it not obvious that I am the one asking.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Yamx
Yamx
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Yes, it is, because of the ending of cierro. That's the first person singular -o.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thefox1205

No porque dice= "cierro" del " yo cierro" No de "cerrar"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pznbananas

I put "Can I close the door?", why is this wrong?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fsampaio1010

Cos the meaning of the sentence which you wrote in spanish is "¿Puedo cerrar la puerta?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BakerGurl247

I thought the right answer would be "Close the door." not do i close the door

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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You are not necessarily wrong, but in Spanish, the 'I' comes with the verb form, 'cierro', and in English, it would likely be understood.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneTiffany

Baker, how is that a question?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Allinuse
Allinuse
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Should I close the gate should be correct as well.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fsampaio1010

Gate doesn't have the same meaning. It's like a big door or "portón" in spanish.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markbooth
markbooth
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In a previous exercise I was shown a picture of a gate with the words 'la puerta' beneath it, so I think gate is a possible translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fsampaio1010

I see. But, as I told before, they don't have the same meaning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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fsampaio, are you a native speaker and, if so, from where? I ask because, (1) as markbooth says, many sources define both "gate" and "door" as "puerta," as here:

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/puerta

and (2) I wonder if the usage of "portón" might be a regional thing ("portón" in SD dictionary being "large door."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fsampaio1010

I'm brazilian and I speak "brazilian portuguese" as natural language which is very similar to spanish in the majority of the words. The both languages have the same root. I can assure you that it's not a regional thing. A "portón" is used for garage doors, or for a major entrance of a house, for example. A "puerta" is a common door of cars, rooms and bedroons. You can check it at the same place you informed me: http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/port%25C3%25B3n

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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Please understand, with that link, I wasn't trying to "inform you," but to show how in many cases, for Anglophones, door and gate are both defined as "puerta."

This never made a lot of sense to me.

But yes, the link you provided is the same place I found "portón" defined as 'large door' or "large entrance," and I am very happy to find that there is a separate word for these things. These are, indeed, also different from doors to rooms, etc.

The question, though, is, "what is "gate," as in "gate to the castle," "gate to the compound," "gate to the park," etc.

Portón?

If so, that's different, again, from "garage door" or "large entrance to a house."

But it's better than "puerta."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/burgerburglar

Por qué no accepta "May I close the door?"? Because I believe it's more common in English.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ranchers1

It gets a little bit more involved. "Can I"= Do I have the ability to close the door. "May I"= Is it OK if I close the door. Both are OK, but I wouldn't as in a Texas road house "May I" about anything. No joke here. Colloquialisms have different meanings in all languages.... It's fun to study them though.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bvanw
bvanw
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"May I" is what I use naturally in expressing this statement in English. I'd say "May I" in Texas or California or Pennsylvania or Maine or The Dakotas or the Carolinas. Or any other English speaking place. Its just polite And assertive too. If I wish to be rude then I'll say "I'm shutting the door "

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

"May I" is asking if I can. "Do I" is asking if I should. Slightly different meaning.

If my boss called me into his/her office I would use "Do I" which would be asking if this is a private meeting. If I requested the meeting with my boss I would say "May I" which would denote to him/her that I wanted it to be a private meeting.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bryantrsmith

What about "Close the door?"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoesVanBos
LoesVanBos
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"cierro" is the form for first person singular "Close the door?" sounds like addressing another person (or people), and in that case it would be cierra (tú), cierre (usted), cerrad (vosotros), or cierren (ustedes).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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Then it wouldn't be a question but a command - telling someone, or giving a command to someone, to close tbe door.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shahmir134

how would you say "may I close the door?” or "can I close the door?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fsampaio1010

¿Puedo cerrar la puerta?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/willbyzx

I'll close the door -- is also wrong - but why - or simply - Close the door. This should be accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TracyS221
TracyS221
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You probably know this by now but for others reading this - I will close the door is actually future tense, even though we often use it to refer to something that we are just about to do. Duo wants present tense here.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jennanueva

I don't understand... Where does the "I" come from? I thought it was just "Close the door?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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@ wordnerd1: "I" is understood because of the verb "cierro" which means "(I) close". The sentence begins with the inverted question mark so it means IT IS a question. Okay, so we're looking for a question sentence here, but "I close the door" is a statement, not a question, and merely adding a question mark at the end of it doesn't make it one. But we NEED to make this statement into a question, therefore, we add the auxiliary verb "do" (that's how we do it in English). In Spanish, they don't need to put the auxiliary verb "do" when they ask this question because they have this inverted question mark at the beginning of the sentence. Hope this helps :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GringoSolo

And what is wrong with just asking "close the door?" "i" is given as the person asking the question!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

In English we usually don't drop I, you, and we like Spanish does. We are much more specific about it. "Close the door" is more of a statement than a question.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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We do it all the time in informal communication. "Pass the rolls" at the dinner table? "Gone to the store" on the kitchen white board? "Love you!" as your daughter drives away?

And there is nothing "unspecific" about Spanish omission of explicit personal pronouns; where they are omitted, the specificity is either embedded in the verb form (Que dijiste?/ what did you say?) or it is understood by context.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

You made all statements, not questions. Our verbs do not change like Spanish verbs do....duh I knew that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
tejano
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I assumed you knew that. But the point was that you said, "We are much more specific about it." That is not so.

As to the statements, they – including "Close the door?" – become questions with a question mark or the appropriate inflection if spoken.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Michael330443

Will I or Shall I - what is the difference?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lorihance

I said "Did I close the door?" Why is that wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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That's past tense rather than present. "Did I close the door?" would be, "¿Cerré la puerta?"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khalil3x6

Besides a limo driver, who would ask such a question and under what circumstances? I really enjoy Duolingo and I am learning, but once again I am puzzled as to how this sentence and others like it are meant to help us learn Spanish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

The vision I had was a situation where I am called into someone's office and I ask if I should close the door behind me. Or I might ask when I am leaving someone's office (close the door behind me?). Though in Spanish, I would probably say: ¿Debería cerrar la puerta? rather than what's written in this example.

I think (but I am not sure) that the point of this example is to show that in Spanish one can take a regular sentence and turn it into a question just by inflection (or, in the case of writing, by using the question marks around the sentence). Although this can be done sometimes in English, too, it's much more common in Spanish.

4 years ago

[deactivated user]

    Hearing sentence does not even give any inclination of a question.

    EditDelete3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Tony111ster

    It's about intonation and structure. In spanish when asking a question, you can omit subjects. "Cierro la puerta" means "I close the door", and since we have cerrar conjugated in the "I" form, we can omit "yo" from the sentence. Now, if we add question marks "¿Cierro la puerta?" you change it from a statement into something subjective, and since languages are different, you need to forget English grammer and speculate. Not everything translates word-for-word, so you could say something like "Do you want me to close the door?" and it would be pretty accurate to the meaning. :-)

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
    tejano
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    That's all very true, but you can do much the same in English without adding the additional wording; for instance, assume you are called into someone's office for what you know will be a private meeting. If the door is open and they catch your eye as you walk in, it is quite natural to simply say, "Close the door?" where that "Do you want me to . . . " is simply understood.

    And yes, English speakers do drop personal subject pronouns in informal, short-hand speech (or writing) between close associates and family.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/mattsean
    mattsean
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    What's the difference between abrir and cerrar?

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/michonne44

    Abrir means to open and cerrar means to close.

    3 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/PitiRR
    PitiRR
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    Duolingo accepted "Can I close the door?" however would a Spanish say that in this sense?

    2 years ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/thefreeaccount

    Translations of this nature are very confusing to me, since the provided example is presente indicativo, which we are told represents facts and immediate observations in the present time.

    Spanish has the subjuntive mood, which is used to express actions that may not / have not / will not take place. It's not clear to me why the subjuntive would not make more sense in this situation. Neitherb do I understand that when I respond in the subjuntive, the response is not considered appropriate.

    But the worst is the fact that the indicativo presente (present questions like this example) and imperativo presente (immediate commands) often have very similar conjugations.

    For example, if someone says "Hablo demasiado" and I reply "(Ud) No habla demasiado conmigo," my reply will be taken to mean the opposite, ie, "(Tu) no habla demasiado conmigo"

    This a little frustrating and I don't understand how native Spanish speakers deal with a conversation that would be simple and direct in English, such as:

    "Do I talk too much?" "No, you don't talk too much."

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/LouieLawton

    I'll close the door?

    Same as 'Shall I close the door' - which is marked correct.

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/tejano
    tejano
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    Actually, the argument can be made that they are not quite the same. Shall and will have the same meanings for expressing future tense, but there are subtle differences where the object is to convey obligation, suggestion, or to ask a question.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shall_and_will#Questions

    1 year ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/CARLOSDANG130097

    The "should I" is silent, but I am not. It's CLOSE THE DOOR? with translation inferred by context and voice deflection.

    7 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Chris913144

    Why Close the door? wrong

    3 months ago