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"You are waiting for something to happen."

Translation:Estás esperando que algo pase.

5 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/arturohiero

Suceder = to happen, to occur, subjunctive sudeda was rejected.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jasondbarber
jasondbarber
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Wouldn't this mean that you are hoping for something to happen?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ana_81
ana_81
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I'm a native Spanish speaker, I think it's possible but usually we would rather say "Tienes esperanzas de que algo ocurra/suceda/pase" ("to hope for" = "tener esperanza/s"). "Esperar" usually means "to wait" and I think that you can wait for something to happen, without actually hoping (wishing) for it. So duolingo is not wrong about this.

But the verb "esperar" can also imply hope/desire in certain contexts, for instance: "Estás esperando que el problema se resuelva solo" (You are hoping for the problem to resolve itself). Here is another interesting example: "Hope for the best, expect the worst", which can be translated as "Espera lo mejor, prepárate para lo peor".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sofrankly

I think you are right and that it can take both meanings and that Spanish is imprecise in that regard, but I would love to hear from someone who knows for sure.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluharty13

I would love for DL to at least explain what the heck I'm doing in this lesson. I don't understand when to use imperative vs. subjunctive. I don't even know what subjunctive means.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregHullender
GregHullender
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The subjunctive is almost never the main verb of a sentence. The imperative (which often looks like the subjunctive) is always the main verb, so that gives you an easy way to tell them apart.

The subjunctive, like the indicative (by the way, don't confuse "indicative" with " imperative") forms you've already learned, is a set of verb forms that specify person, number, and time, but, unlike the indicative, do not presume that the action really happened. Note that the infinitive is even more vague, since it doesn't even have person, number, or time. Both subjunctive and indicative are usually found only in subordinate clauses. The main verb is almost always indicative.

When you have two verbs tied together, you usually use the infinitive if the subject of both is the same. Espero llegar a tiempo is "I hope to arrive on time."

But sometimes the subordinate verb has a different subject from the first verb. "I hope that he arrives on time." Espero que llegue a tiempo. In these cases, you use the subjunctive whenever it's not clear that the action really happened. A main verb like hope, want, fear, etc. always forces the subjunctive on the subordinate verb. In lots of cases, the main verb will have different meanings depending on whether the subordinate verb is subjunctive vs. indicative. For example, esperar + subjunctive means "to hope that" but esperar + indicative means "to expect".

Espero que llueve. (I'm expecting it to rain.) This is indicative. Espero que llueva (I hope it rains) this is subjunctive.

You find it in relative clauses too. "I'm looking for a student who speaks Spanish." In English, we don't know whether you have someone in mind ("His name is José") or if you haven't found anyone yet. In Spanish, you use the subjunctive to distinguish. Busco un estudiante que habla español means you know the person already. Busco un estudiante que hable español means you don't know one yet.

There are a few other places the subjunctive turns up, but this is the basic idea. It goes in subordinate clauses whenever the main verb signals doubt or uncertainty about whether the subordinate clause really happened.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s3amkelley

That was really good and I'm trying to absorb it all. In the second paragraph, next to the last sentence, did you mean "subjunctive and infinitive" rather than "subjunctive and indicative"? Thank you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fluharty13

That. Was. Awesome.

Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProfesorAntonnio
ProfesorAntonnio
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"Estás esperando que algo suceda" es correcto, pero lo rechaza.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sofrankly

Is it really false to say: estás esperando que pase algo?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ana_81
ana_81
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es correcto pero lo rechaza, lo reporté

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/c.ritchieo

Eso puse yo también

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joris.ev

is "pase" the subjunctive or something? Because duolingo doesn't make any sense here, it says: "You used the él/ella/usted form "pasa" instead of the yo form "pase". "

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GregHullender
GregHullender
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I thought esperar que + subjunctive always meant "to hope that" while esperar que + indicative meant "to wait for." Is this translation correct at all?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleBotten
KyleBotten
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estas esperar para algo pase?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jungkimmy

"Esperas para que algo pase" es incorrecto. Por que?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s3amkelley

What's wrong with "espera que algo pase"? I get that it's not as good, I just don't know why it's wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryceSpringfield
BryceSpringfield
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¿Por qué no acepta «Estás esperando que algo occura»?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatherineA184859

Surely the translation is a question? ?estás esperando que algo pase?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barb.a.morin
barb.a.morin
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So far in Duolingo i can't see when to use estar+gerund and just the present tense - it seems to vary inconsistently through the exercises - one being accepted one place and then not being accepted in another

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s3amkelley

I have found that, too. And if I guess wrong I just report it as "my answer should be accepted" Sometimes they do! :)

1 month ago