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"A pesar de toda su riqueza no es feliz."

Translation:Despite all her wealth she is not happy.

5 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/howcheng
howcheng
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Shouldn't this be using estar instead of ser?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgeT
GeorgeT
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Sure seems like it to me. It's a state of being, not a permanent quality. Even alive, dead, and married use estar. Hmm. Native speakers, little help?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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I think it's the difference between a temporary state (not happy right now) vs the person's nature (not a happy person in general). So the point being made is that the person's wealth isn't making their life a happy one.

You see this business with ser and estar for lots of adjectives, the meaning changes depending on which one you use. And even when you only use one of them, I think your non-temporary examples with estar are really exceptions to the rule!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andru1485
Andru1485
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I agree with you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Coayuco
Coayuco
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You might think of it as quirk. Although happiness cannot be guaranteed as a permanent state, we think of it as long-term. "Ser" is almost always used with "feliz". You might say that someone "está feliz" if you are emphasizing a change in the person's state - he is happy now that … = él está feliz ahora que…"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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Being rich is not a momentary thing, almost all the time. Even if it were the case that a very rich person lost all his/her money in one instant, I'd still use ser to describe having been rich, say for the first half of one's life, and then being poor for the rest of one's life. One instance I can think of where I would use estar is if I were at the race track and I won one race that paid off well: estoy rico! - a relatively small sum of money which is not going to last long. However, if I won the lottery, I'd use ser - I am rich now, and I am going to continue to be rich, because it's a whole lot of money that I can't spend in a few hours.

There's also the philosophical idea of being "rich" - that would take ser also. "Soy rico porque soy un artista."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rumidge
rumidge
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I used "he is not happy" and it was incorrect?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie_Heitz

I just assumed the choice of Ser here gives the Spanish a further shade of meaning not possible with "is" in English, implying that the lack of happiness with wealth with some people is an essential state.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Yeah, estar and ser can operate as contrasting versions of the same state, with estar meaning 'at the moment' (which could be a long period of time) and ser being more about the essential qualities, a sort of deeper observation if you like.

This has a few examples of those contrasts!
http://spanish.about.com/cs/verbs/a/servsestar.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sabadero
sabadero
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Could anybody please, explaining to me why "Despite of all her..." is wrong?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/telemetry
telemetry
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Despite = in spite of, the word already has an 'of' meaning so you don't add one to the end. Just an awkward preposition thing you have to learn :)

In case you just misplaced it, "all her wealth" and "all of her wealth" are both fine

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sabadero
sabadero
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thank you very much!

2 years ago