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https://www.duolingo.com/Sie00

If you have completed one romance language tree, how much quicker will you be at your second tree?

Sie00
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For example If I have completed Spanish and am at a decent level around 16 or so, what will It be like if I begin with the Italian, or French tree?

Has anybody any experience with this?

4 years ago

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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It definitely helps. I've finished my Spanish tree, and I can understand Portuguese and French ahead of what I have learned (especially French, I'm really at Level 6, but I can do some translations in Immersion), because of the ties they have to Spanish.

As for the trees, having a Romance background helps with basic rules and grammar. For Portuguese, it's almost like going through Spanish again, though I haven't really done too much. But, for me, it's as if French is a new language. It has different rules and exceptions (I assume like English is to non-English speakers), so it presents another challenge.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sie00
Sie00
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Okay thanks for that. That is a good point about exceptions.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexisLinguist
AlexisLinguist
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You're welcome.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nameless_grace

I learned French in school, but when I started up the Spanish tree here, it didn't help at all. Spanish and French, despite both being Romance languages, aren't really too similar. I remember that my friends in college (most of which took Spanish) and I would trade language textbooks and try to read what it said. They would try to pronounce every vowel and I would pronounce none of them. It was rather funny. That being said, reading will come a little easier as many words have a similar root. Speaking is a different story. I cannot speak to the grammar as I am not proficient or even passable really in either language.

I cannot say for sure, but I believe Italian tends to have a more similar pronunciation to Spanish than French. Maybe knowing Spanish will help there.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeteBerardi

french is a lot harder after learning spanish. romance language or not, french is more detailed and more intricate. you cant get away with as many little mistakes. also its a bit unintuitive...l have taken the same amount of classes for spanish and french and to me french is just more strict and more difficult to remember.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JaniceLove1

I agree with Pete^. I've studied Spanish, Latin and Irish before trying French and I found French to be really hard. Even harder than Irish!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/love4language92

Spanish and Italian have many similar roots. French is a little different then Spanish but it should also be a little easier with the Spanish you have already learned. good luck and happy studies :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sie00
Sie00
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@namelessgrace That's a funny story about trading language books :P Thanks for your answer. @PeteBerardi Thank you, I suspected that French was strichter and have heard that before. It's interesting how you say It is less intuative. I hadn't considered that aspect much. @JaniceLove1 I studied Irish in school. But never paid much attention :P @love4language92 Thanks for the wishes. For you too. I plan to tackle the Italian tree as soon as I complete my Spanish one {

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IETBAtotalk

Italian and Portuguese are closer to Spanish than French. Actually, "Gallego" which is almost the same as Portuguese or the same pure language is spoken in the Spanish district which is over the North of Portugal: Galicia.

I do not think a Spaniard can understood French without studying it. Indeed, they might understand some of Italian or Portuguese if they are spoken slowly, especially if the Spaniard knows a couple of differences.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lexiwilson
lexiwilson
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I learned French and now I've started with Spanish. If you were to start French, you'd have a leg up on learning vocabulary. Dormir, correr/courir, etc are things that are different from English but not that hard to remember if you know either of the languages. French pronunciation is totally different and in my opinion, harder. If you put your mind to it, it wouldn't take too long to pick up. Listening though, the biggest difference I've found is that Spanish words mirror pretty similarly in the way they sound to the way they're written. French doesn't AT ALL. If this is something that will really bother/frustrate you, then I'd suggest Italian.

4 years ago