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"It is an English ship."

Translation:Es un barco inglés.

5 years ago

61 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/senorboother

ingles DOES NOT mean british

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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depends. what do you know about set theory?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattBenet
MattBenet
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love it. One who is English, is British...... but one who is British is not necessarily English

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

I think I didn't get the question? Inglés = English / Británico = British. We usually use "inglés" as British, though.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EugeneBast1

It s freezing

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eamon976353

Then you shouldn't. For your own safety never try that in Scotland

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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I am not sure who you are replying to or who shouldn't do what in Scotland, but I am intrigued

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lindabroocks
lindabroocks
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Agree.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tango-alpha

Yes, it does, actually. Just like in English. We can say a British ship but also an English ship.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

(Psst--British and English are not actuality interchangeable)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidmalt

You cannot say that "british" is necessarily "english" as british may well be from scotland, ireland or wales.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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No part of Ireland is British.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

techically true but like it or not in most of the world, including Canada which is part of the commonwealth, we would equate being "English" as being from the British Isles, Great Britain, etc. unless they specified they were "Scottish", 'Welsh", etc. Ie, we think of Richard Burton as being an "English" actor even though we know he is"Welsh" too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eamon976353

Then you are being totally ignorant

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/suewoods5946

It seems like everything I try to read something else into the translation, I get it wrong. "ingles" means English and "britanico" means British. I think they are two totally different things or they would not have two different words.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/calaha717

"Nave" should be acceptable.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Es una nave inglés was accepted for me (6/15)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/speedier

Yes calaha717, and so should buque

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MexicoMadness
MexicoMadness
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Why isn't barco de englés acceptable?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

"English" is used here as an adjective (grammatically speaking) and not as a possessive. de would be used when it is possessive (de Inglaterra = of/from England) and when it is made of something (barco de madera = wooden ship)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fswindell1
fswindell1
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british is a generic word fo one fom the UK,, English means from england one of foru parts of UK for which britis is correct

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foomancrue

Not Es un barco DE ingles?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

inglés is used as an adjective or for the language. For the country, it's Inglaterra.

"English" is used here as an adjective (grammatically speaking) and not as a possessive. de would be used when it is possessive (de Inglaterra = of/from England) and when it is made of something (barco de madera = wooden ship)

You may say, "wait, what's the difference between "an English ship" and "a ship from England"? It's about the grammar in this case.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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Daniel-in-BC, what you say is true. The phrases are grammatically different but convey the same meaning. Duolingo sometimes demands translation with similar grammatical structure and other times allows the translation to be very loose. For example, Duolingo accepts "She suffers from depression" as a translation for "Ella tiene depresión" which is very different grammatically. This might cause students to expect that "barco de Ingleterra" would be accepted as well as "barco inglés." We should report any reasonably accurate translations so that they can be added. Personally, I like to know the both the literal translation and the more natural-sounding phrase.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sylvainqc

"Es una nave inglesa" was accepted. 2015-11-05

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/territech
territech
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So is "nave" another word for "ship"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JersonBald

Can you make this sentence feminine? Like: Es una barca inglesa.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Not really. La barca refers to a small boat. When you identify a boat as belonging to a country you are almost always speaking of a large ship. Except for nouns referring to things with a natural gender like people, ones that exist with two genders have a variation in meaning. They are sometimes small differences, but can be significant. Some relate to English homonyms like el capital = capital investment but la capital = capital city or letter. Others are related like el puerto = port but la puerta = door. But others have no apparent relationship with each other. El moral = blackberry bush but la moral = moral. As you can see, the issue is gender which goes beyond the o/a endings. Here is a link with some more. http://spanish.about.com/od/nouns/a/double_gendered.htm

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bowlerae

The previous sentence was "Mi madre es inglesa" (My mother is English) so I translated this sentence as "Es un barco inglesa" but it was wrong. I'm confused.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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The word Madre, like your mother, is feminine. But barco is a masculine word. Most adjectives ending in o have a feminine counterpart ending in a, but there are some which don't end in our which will add an a to modify a feminine noun. This is true of words of Nationality and of words that end in der as in embajador and embajadora.

Él barco inglés but La mujer inglesa Él hombre español but la música española Él vino francés but la moda francesa

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bowlerae

Thank you I did not know the rule applied to words of nationality.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gracelynn57425

I got this question wrong and was instantly asked it again and wrote in the answer it just told me. How can I be wrong if that was the systems answer?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Conrad-O

:-D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexMorgan10

Why is "Barca" incorrect? Surely the boat is the subject so can be masculine or feminine?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/speedier

Afraid not Alex, in the same way as a window ventana can't be masculine ventano.

Funnily enough though, in English we do think of ships as feminine. E.g, at naming ceremonies the words are usually something like: "God bless her and all who sail in her".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexMorgan10

Strange, it says "Barca" means "Boat" in the online Spanish dictionary.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlwynM
AlwynM
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"Barca" may be acceptable for "boat" but it doesn't really translate as "ship" (Barco/Barco Grande).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexMorgan10

What about "Gata?" I have heard people use "Gata" to mean "female cat" is that wrong too?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/speedier

Hi Alex. No, animals have two genders and sometimes this can be signified by changing the last letter, gata/gato, perra/perro, and at other times not: torro/vaca, but inanimate objects only have one.

You're right about barca, but that is a different word meaning a very small boat/rowboat.

http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=barca

not to be thought of as a feminine version of barco which is a large boat or ship.

http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=barco

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

Cats aren't non-living objects, they have genders of their own. Ships aren't born with a gender identity so the Spanish refer to them as male. Can't really compare something like a street or a ship with a mammal, unfortunately.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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It's not that the ship is male, it is the word "barco" that is masculine.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

I understand that ;o)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I didn't mean to imply that you didn't Casiquire. I just didn't want a beginner to be confused.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Barca is a small boat.

2 years ago