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"Las calles"

Translation:The streets

5 years ago

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/WeekzGod
WeekzGod
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"Soy de las calles" - ever reggaeton rapper ever.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rachvx
rachvx
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I find it interesting that "calles" can also mean "(you) shut up" or "(you) be quiet"! Do any of y'all know why that is?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/renamarie

callar∗ ≈to shut up ∗ verb, te callas - you shut up (spanishdict.com) I can hear my italian grandfather saying in jest, thru his thick accent - "shut up to you" there is the direct object!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sudopacman

I've heard my Mexican friends say "callate la boca" (shut your mouth) and just "callate" alone.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

Yeah, "callar" is to be silent, so the reflexive "callarse" is to silence oneself (to shut up). "Cállate" is the imperative ("You shut up!").

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kcngo

And this is how you may use it as un juez en el corte:

https://youtu.be/tYkmyidHAlQ?t=2m52s

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikBoyle
ErikBoyle
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Actually it can't. 'Calles' is only the second person singular subjunctive and negative imperative form. So "No te calles" would mean "Don't shut up," but that's not a very common saying. The second person singular positive imperative form of 'callar' is 'calla'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trevor71375

why is calle feminine when it ends in an e?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikBoyle
ErikBoyle
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Words that end in e aren't clearly marked as masculine or feminine and there are plenty of both... It just is what it is.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Trevor71375

thank you Erik

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/laurel541478
laurel541478
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You may be thinking of french where many words ending in e are feminine

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CaptsinFoxy

Are there a different word "road" or is "calle" for all things like that? ei; street, road lane, etc. (English has so many words for the same thing.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cathykirby

There are many different words in Spanish too, and not just for paths, streets or similar. In my use of Duo, I've seen la carretera for the road and la pista for the track (and pista means a bunch of other things too). If you haven't seen them yet, you will. :) These are useful as well:

https://www.google.com/search?q=translate&rlz=1C1CHWA_enUS605US605&oq=translate&aqs=chrome..69i57j69i60l3j0l2.3880j0j7&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

I like to use it without actually going to google translate because you get other translations in the drop down if there are more than one.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translation

This one is Great because you see sentence examples and full conjugations of verbs among other things.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CapablePecan

Me too. I L-O-V-E spanish, JUST LIKE readingmaster.

Wait... readingmaster, your comment- it's a bit weird---

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesCaulfield1

He pronounces the LL with a little bit of the old school upper crust accent -- "Las Callyes". Whenever I hear that pronunciation I always think it sounds a little pretentious.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Handrisuselo
Handrisuselo
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Callar = to be quiet Callarse = to be quiet to oneself. ¡Cállate! = Shut up!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gab850072

Do you live in the Phillipines.

2 months ago