Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"El gas"

Translation:The gas

5 years ago

57 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/cmmcirvin

It didn't take "gas" as an answer. It needed "the gas". Why?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fireman_biff

As far as I know, "el gas" translates to "the gas" because gas is a concrete noun. When dealing with these kinds of nouns you keep the article when translating to English.

Abstract nouns often don't use the article in English so "la soledad" would translate just to "loneliness" and "la primavera" just to "spring" (though I guess the exact translation for these will depend on the context).

There's also other reasons to keep/drop the article: http://spanish.about.com/od/adjectives/a/intro_def_art.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/theonlymark

"Gas isn't always dangerous."

How do you translate this into Spanish and maintain the lack of a definite article? I'll be surprised if it lets you omit the "el".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Enrique844752

El gas no siempre es peligroso

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rjkeats
rjkeats
  • 25
  • 214

Thanks for your reply. Your reply finally made me understand when to keep "the" and when not to. Gracias!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
  • 21
  • 15
  • 10
  • 6

Keep in mind that Fireman's comment is generally true but only with object nouns. For subject nouns the article is nearly always included in Spanish irrespective of whether the noun is concrete or abstract.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlphaGaming

To put it simply, it asked for 'the gas' not 'gas'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cogbon
cogbon
  • 23
  • 11

I actually thought "the fart" would be accepted after seeing flatulence in the drop down but it's not, in case anyone was wondering...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SofiaTheGreat44

The fart is 'el pedo'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EntourageEffect

It didn't accept flatulence either.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Claire083

25/8/17 "The flatulence" was accepted. I haven't tried it with the "el" though. To save someone scrolling down through the comments, so far "the fart" hasn't been accepted.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melmelj

I was wondering :o..bugger..now I still need to learn how to say 'the fart' in Spanish

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baconquistador

Why thank you, i was

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mr.Smilie
Mr.Smilie
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 3
  • 1339

heh, yeah, I seen the same thing and so I tried "flatulence" and wondered about "fart" but don't try it unless you don't mind being pinged.. I tried it and the owl said "no".. <sub>shrugs</sub>

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bill-Roca

the drop down has 'gas' or 'wind' ... in Mexico I heard 'viento' for wind, so is that the more common word everywhere or is this another Latin vs Peninsular difference, or just two equally used ways of saying the same thing?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

Well, Viento is wind, everywhere.

Maybe you want to have a look here: http://duolingo.com/#/comment/387605

gas is gas, easy there, but methane is a gas... (at least on standard conditions) and wind can also mean flatulece. In Spanish it can be used and "tener gases" is, I believe, self explanatory.

You will excuse not giving more useful details, but I've heard DL is getting some recommendations against vulgarisms, recommending people "to discover it into the wild"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

Thank, you, jindr004, nice observation (below). RAMOSRAUL, I am intrigued by "discover it into the wild." What is the equivalent in Spanish, please, and what exactly does it mean?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EvertRozen

Don't think it applies to words like "flatulece". Thanks I did not even have that in my English vocabulary while I did discover a lot of English words in the wild :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
  • 25
  • 14
  • 8
  • 198

I think we have an Atlantic rift here. What U.S. Americans call gas in the digestive tract is what the Brits call wind. To allow for transatlantic use (and to avoid being called names by the queen's anglophones) it would make sense to have wind as an alternative meaning in that very very limited context.

I think this is what RAMOSRAUL was getting at when he said it was a delicate subject

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Duolingo now has "flatulence" listed as an option.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 14
  • 259

I agree, but the context is quite universal (I understand)! ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MadameJoan

The drop down has 'gas' or 'wind' but I gave 'wind' for my answer and they marked me wrong! Here in Mexico 'wind' is 'viento'.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 14
  • 259

I think the link to Nature is what we call in the UK "Natural Gas" which is (mainly) methane collected from Natural Gas fields around Britain (mainly under the North Sea) and distributed through an extensive network of pipelines around the country for use as an industrial and domestic fuel.

At home, I cook on a "gas stove", and my central heating and hot water uses a "gas boiler". The gas is piped into my house via a meter (much like my electricity is metered).

Note to speakers of American English: "gas" is not a vehicle liquid fuel (as in gasoline); we in the UK call that "petrol" (as in petroleum).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 379

Yes, that was my question, whether this can also cover gasoline for the car..or maybe that would be gasolina..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jellonz
jellonz
  • 21
  • 15
  • 10
  • 6

"Gasolina" is the one I'm familiar with, and regional variations include "nafta" and "bencina" according to SpanishDict. I read somewhere that Mexicans do use "gas" for "gasolina," and I guess potentially anyone in a "gasolina" region could use the same colloquial abbreviation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 379

thanks for that..

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

In Spain we use either "viento" or "aire" for wind, not "gas". What about other countries?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

In France.

To mean farting (sorry): vents (vientos) or gaz (gas), or pet (pedo) To mean gas, it's only "gaz".
To mean air, it's only "air". (unless you talk about "breathing gas", gaz respirables)
To mean wind, it's only "vent" (unless you talk about "current of air" (courrants d'air)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Baconquistador

Hmm... this is such a confusing word! WHAT COULD IT MEAN!?!?! :P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mwood611
mwood611
  • 16
  • 13
  • 8
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

I'll really have trouble remembering it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foomancrue

Surprisingly "the fart" was not accepted

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 14
  • 259

It has been commented on 'to the far end of a fart" above.

I understand it is los gases in Spanish, but you could use la flatulencia or la ventosidad instead.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foomancrue

Gracias. I suppose I should have said todavia. It's still not accepted. The indignity.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Pedo or peo is what spanishdict suggests for fart.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Lol. Also flatulences?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johncaveishere

I thought this was a lesson about nature, not about automobiles? Hence why I answered "The wind"... hello, duo? O.o

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catcampion

Gas ≠ gasoline/petrol. Although, "gas," can be used as a shortened form of, "gasoline," in nature, gas has many other definitions/uses - including flatulence, as mentioned above. If you are not a native English speaker, you can reference an online dictionary.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johncaveishere

I saw that "wind" is a translation of "gas", alibet the bottom one, and because this was the nature lesson, I assumed that was the best one. I would think "The gas" would be more suited to a chemistry lesson. It's an interesting observation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catcampion

Yup - chemistry = nature!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ken.Coyote

"The fart" was wrong, comon!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deanoneer

lo tengo.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ollie_P
Ollie_P
  • 25
  • 11
  • 6
  • 6
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3

Does anyone else think the audio sounds funny? I feel like there's too much emphasis on the "El". Is that how someone actually speaking Spanish would say those particular words?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linda478846

In Baja California, Mexico, when anyone says they need to go buy "gas" they are almost always speaking of Propane, the main necessity of life used for cooking. "Echarle gasolina al coche" is, of course, gasoline.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paabo
Paabo
  • 14
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7

Why did "the fart" not work

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
  • 23
  • 22
  • 19
  • 14
  • 259

There are a few answers to this above (including mine).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ellie496280

The drop down has gas, flatulence or wind, y didnt i get wind correct? Then it shouldnt have been in the drop down box as an option

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sporta-Ashura

one of the hints for 'gas' was 'wind'. And again, i try something less obvious from the hints showing and it's wrong. Almost got used to it :P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JagdeepSin2

I thought it said "llegas'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Waterip0
Waterip0
  • 13
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3

Hehe, speaking of

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WrappedShi

In a lesson on nature (grass, sun, ect.) The wind should be an acceptable translation!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/suparna.mondal

i dont understand" La" & "El " both means" The "but its really Confusing which one to use out of both

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CharlesWel12

Holy cow this is so mean and inconsiderate of my feelings. When I hovered over the word "gas" one of the English words given to me was "flatulence". However, when I entered "the flatulence", it was counted wrong. This is an outrage, a disaster. I curse Duolingo and all its inhabitants for eternity. May you rot in a world without grammar and fall into despair at the hands of your own intolerant creation.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stephen581800

Would Spanish use "el gas" to refer to gasoline as well?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/safkakar

This lady pronouces it as: el yas instead of el gas with a g! Very confusing.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danihelus
Danihelus
  • 15
  • 8
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

This is going to be difficult to remember.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BSmvRNLE

I thought I would try just "gas" and it was accepted.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/viiduus
viiduus
  • 14
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3

i thought "gas" was "gasolina"?

4 months ago