"Novi Eboraci habitamus."

Translation:We live in New York.

September 14, 2020

7 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Camila328794

What's the meaning of "Eboraci", literally?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

Eboracum is the name of the Roman fort and city that eventually became the city of York in Britain. From my understanding it is a Latinised version of a old Celtic word meaning something like "belonging/related to/having yew (tree)". The ebor part giving the 'yew' meaning.

Eboraci as used here is just the locative form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JennyRusse1

Here is a fascinating description of how Eboracum mutated into York, with a couple of theories on the original name. https://englandsnortheast.co.uk/yorkshire-york-origins/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AltheKazel

Minime! Ego non habito en Novi Eboraci, sed habito in Italia.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/danryan0

Is the locative form the same as the genitive form?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

The locative for the singular first (Roma -> Romae) and second (Eboracum -> Eboraci) declension nouns is the same as the genitive.

Other nouns will usually be the same as the ablative or dative (off the top of my head I am not sure which is more common with nouns where the endings differ). E.g. Athens (Athenae -> Athenis a first declension plural only noun), Carthage (Carthago -> Carthagini or Carthagine a third declension noun).

Video that talks about the locative: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VwLS-fh3pVg


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JussiRanta1

Eboracum grew throughout the Roman era—from a “yew tree place” to a camp, from a camp to a fort, to a city, to a regional capital; there was always something new to it. Couldn’t we guess someone said and even wrote “Eboraci novi” and “novi Eboraci” back then

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