Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"My tie is orange."

Translation:Mi corbata es naranja.

5 years ago

74 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/JessicaAFM

I commented on this in another thread. Here is my response from there: It really depends on the country. But naranja is both the color and the fruit in a lot of spanish speaking countries. Some here have said they were taught one way (naranja), others were taught the other (anaranjado). Both of my Spanish teachers in high school taught naranja as both meanings and anaranjado wasn't taught at all. One of my teachers was a native spanish speaker so I have no reason to doubt his ability to speak spanish. Chalk it up to dialect differences. :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CutePorcupine

Yeah, my Spanish teacher taught us anaranjado as the color and naranja as the fruit, but different Spanish-speaking countries have different ways of saying the same thing!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kurell.jul

Ditto

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sra.Iadanza

As a well traveled spanish teacher, I disagree. This is not common at all. Anaranjado is the best option as naranja is only used when people don't know any better or haven't had formal schooling in the language. It is a common issue with heritage and native speakers a like. It is the same laziness we see when people choose to use café or chocolate instead of marrón for brown. Laziness and dumbing down the language because of the influence of English. While I cannot in all fairness say naranja is incorrect it is best to use the actual word for the color rather than the fruit to avoid embarrassing situations.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GiantPants

Though i can some what agree with your statement. Not everyone is like you both well traved and educated. I've noticed this also in english. One cannot force ones opinion on a people who would prefer to say brown instead of gravy. So even though it might make me cringe i go with it for the sake of commuiation and better relations.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sra.Iadanza

I agree. We cannot and should not force anyone to do anything. I was merely saying that outside of Spain many of the Spanish cultures will use anaranjado/a for the adjective because they have their own specific word for the fruit. It is not my place to judge the person or a person's vocabulary. Doing so would make me a very ineffectual teacher who made students feel alienated and ashamed. However, I do despise the pervasive influence of English within the Spanish language. It dilutes the beauty of the language. So, in my classes I welcome all the variations from the many countries, but I am sure to explain where they come from or how they developed. This way everyone feels validated and welcome.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/1radta

I disagree with sra.iadanza's comment. Naranja is just as good as anaranjado. All five of my spanish teachers, who are all native speakers and well educated, have taught me to use the word naranja as the color orange. And you are being quite rude, calling all of us lazy and dum.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatCatLlama

It depends on the place you are in. I listened before I ever said the word and no one has ever said anaranjado. Where i live, they say tomate o narajado o naranja

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiuBang10

If Spanish can influence English, the opposite can also be true. Then again, English has been QUITE a flexible language....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Angelina552657

"Because of the influence of English"? I hope you realize all languages these days are being dumbed down and simplified, English included. True English, in its fullest potential, is extremely rich and full of melifluous words. Don't blame other languages for the dumbing down of nations.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClarissaRi742669

Wheres the dislike button for this digusting judgemental paragraph full of insulting remarks towards those who wers not taught your version of "perfect spanish"

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MetroWestJP
MetroWestJP
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 17
  • 13
  • 2

This is an example of one of the processes of language evolution. Mistakes or changes are made then reproduced until they eventually become common usage. In a few centuries, nobody will remember the word "naranja". But anyone who loves a language can't help but feel a twinge of sorrow when they see a perfectly good word dying, like "anaranjado".

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kiminda
Kiminda
  • 10
  • 6
  • 5
  • 2

Gracias, I didn't know about anaranjado. Now I know!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eGhost57
eGhost57
  • 21
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Come to the Caribbean. Here an orange is called a "china."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swaggynoodle

U b@d

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gpriddy
gpriddy
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

Jessica AFM...It won't let me allow to comment below your thread so here's my questions...Where was he from? And, where was the school? It is widely understood that the fruit is "la naranja" and the color is "anaranjado"...Although I'm from the US I've lived in four Spanish-speaking countries. I'm wondering where they use "naranja" for both the color and the fruit...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClarissaRi742669

I live in the US and none of my spanish books taught the use of anaranjado including my cuban teacher 9th grade puerto rican teacher 10th columbian teacher 11th and my 2 teachers in college 1 from uruguay the other one travel a lot i forgot where she said she was from so i dont see how living in the US means anything clearly it depends on the country just as accents and dialects are different

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jreder

I was always taught orange was anaranjado.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gpriddy
gpriddy
  • 20
  • 17
  • 16
  • 15
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 10
  • 10
  • 5
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3

It is. Naranja is only for the fruit.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/clove1017

apparently my tie is made of fruit

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnRandal4

Made my day

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brodyjbanks

it is not made out of fruit because it can be both color or fruit so naranja can be two things

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

An orange tie. We are just brimming over with good taste in this lesson.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ArtlessAuthor

It took too long for someone to say it. Who gets an orange tie? Aside from clowns, I mean.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ethanmad

Naranja is the fruit, while anaranjado is the color. The -ado ending makes it very clear that anaranjado is indeed an adjective.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/thethinkman

I don't understand gender specificity of colors. Rojo and roja change sensibly but naranja stays the same.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/snowdove

I want to apologize for duolingo teaching something controversial. It appears (after having read a lot of this) that in Spain they use the same word for both the fruit and the color ("naranja") and that in Latin America we use "anaranjado" which would properly change to "anaranjada" in a feminine situation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ClarissaRi742669

This makes sense because in the spanish books i had in class they also taught vos vosotros etc but also had nosotros tu etc it was strange

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sandy585353

Wow! I just learned lots of new things! Thanks, everyone, for sharing.

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orkhydd

Is "mia" used only for plural nouns and never for femanine nouns? Everytime I think I understand gender and word endings.....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goldmama22

As I understand it: "mía" is the feminine version of "mío" but not "mi" - "mi" is for either gender.
"Mi gato es blanco" "El mío es blanco" "Mi gata es blanca" "La mía es blanca"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterWolters

bad taste.. :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Euterpa
Euterpa
  • 24
  • 21
  • 18
  • 12
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3

I would just like to write why is it called 'corbata' in Spanish. The word came to Spanish from Italian "corvatta" or "cravatta", and Italians borrowed the word from French. And the French named it after Croatians. :D Namely, during the Thirty Year's war, Croatian mercenaries in French service wore their traditional, knotted red neckerchiefs that - due to the slight difference between the Croatian word for Croats "Hrvati" and the French word "Croates" - gained the name "cravat". The king Louis XIV liked those neckerchiefs and started to wear one himself and then the fashion spread among the French nobility, Europe, and eventually - the world. :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HBgreenninja

I have a orange tie

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jhopk1

i was taught anaranjado as well...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jontona

Yes, they ALWAYS show naranja as a color in the many books I have...this is the FIRST time I've seen the word 'anaranjado'. Interesting

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/singingfrog007

The possessive adjective 'mia' used after a noun, as in "Corbata mia", is also correct. Mi, tu, and su before a noun are just as acceptable as mia, tuyo, and suyo used right after the noun.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mreeves32

What is wrong with Mi corbata es naranjada?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ambiemercedes

I live in Spain and they use naranja for the fruit and the color.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lukethewind

Who wears orange ties anyway? :P

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OliviaMaschinot

stylish Spanish owls

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CherylAnn12

Why can't I use "esta" instead of "es" in this sentence?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HatuJack

In spanish they have 2 forms of the verb to be, "estar" and "ser". Estar is used for non permanent characteristics, where ser is used for permanent characteristics, except for location of an event. Está is the third person form of estar. Es is the third person form of ser, thus they are completely different words. For a more thorough explanation i recommend spanishdict.com for all your spanish language needs.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/James137592

So, if I was to say, "I am on the couch" I would use estoy (first person of estar), but to say, "I am a man" i would use soy (first person of ser)... ¿Si?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HatuJack

Correct, I believe. Ser is used for time as well as permanent characteristics. So things like "Hora qué es?" "what time is it", and in this rather strange case of "Dónde es?" "where is it" use ser. BUT, estar is used for location, at least in the places i can find. I am unsure as to why it is "dónde es", but that is what i have found. The really confusing part is that ser is used for location of an event, such as a party. "La fiesta es en mi casa", but "mi casa esta en calle cuerta". This is an extremely complicated rule and I am willing to bet that most native speakers won't be bothered by you using the wrong one, so don't worry too much.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/meyerajm

Why can't I say "la corbata mía" instead of "Mi corbata"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rachel_J_Ward

I believe that both of these would impart the same meaning to a native speaker, and the difference is only syntactic, just as it would be in English: "The tie of mine" versus "my tie" both tell the listener that you are talking about a tie which you possess, but in one case you chose the definite article [the] and the possessive adjective [mine], whereas in the other case you chose to use the possessive pronoun [my].

Take it with a grain of salt though, as I'm not a native Spanish speaker.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lorendani

Because mía is a PRONOUN and mi is the ADJECTIVE.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ank_S

Why someone wears orange corbata?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/intelleckttt

¿Corbata es femenino o masculino?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Euterpa
Euterpa
  • 24
  • 21
  • 18
  • 12
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3

Femenino :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AmandaAdri

I recommend this to everyone. So easy! And fun!! Learning great slanish in a fun way. Not just the regular sruff but idioms and phrases. Language of looove!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Momo.Reza
Momo.Reza
  • 25
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 19
  • 12
  • 11
  • 6
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

In Persian we use naranja both for color and fruit. And the translate to Persian : cerevat am narenji e

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kattiebellbell

so what is it exactly? anaranjada or naranja? personally i prefer the former but thats just moi XD

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/troy102

What is the plural form of naranja or anaranjado ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LiuBang10

Naranja - naranjas;

Anaranjad(o/a) - Anaranjad(os/as)

Plurals are for ADJECTIVE FORM ONLY; the color as a noun does not have plurals.

Hope I helped!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Neil684330

Mia/Mio or Mi and why?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thor_87Knight

Mine vs my.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jordan_shane

Im pretty sure anaranjado is orange to, naranja isn't the only way right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/brennapop

This is a stupid question, but why does rhe female voice sound like shes saying "na-RAHN-qhua"? Im very, very new to spanish, clearly

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Euterpa
Euterpa
  • 24
  • 21
  • 18
  • 12
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 6
  • 3

I wasn't hearing it like that before, but now after I read your comment - I do. :D It really does sound like "q" is in there...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/korbei
korbei
  • 22
  • 12
  • 8
  • 5

Is there a difference between naranja and anaranjado?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StormyLOL

Bad hombres!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bagagahoop

Did anyone else think, 'My tie is an orange,' at first too?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pam166634

A "s" difference.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lily955236

Oh, thanks guys! I was confused why it said that because it hadn't said it through the lesson at all. However, they should teach the difference between naranja and anaranjado before saying you got that question wrong.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/olivia412015

I did the samething as the corection and it said i was wrong

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/harmony696473

when describing something, don't you swap around the words? wouldn't this be "es naranja mi corbata" not the other way around? in English it would be "my tie is orange" but in Spanish it would be "es naranja mi corbata". I am so confused !

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Piotr389753
Piotr389753
  • 11
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 2
  • 77

"Mi corbata es en color de naranja.", or maybe "Mi corbata es el color de naranja." - isn't OK? Or possibly better?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Davidxote

Tie (verb): atar. Tie (noun): lazo. Tie or Necktie (noun): corbata.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LanguagesLoveMe

I meant to type naranja not naranjas!!!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jocelyn478694

Is there a difference between naranja and anaranjado?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrentDavis6

Naranja sholud be anaranjado

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnnyKing12

Okay Gracia

9 months ago