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https://www.duolingo.com/Sameera1405

How long can it take to become fluent in French?

Have a look at this one:- http://www.frenchcrazy.com/2011/08/how-long-does-it-take-to-become-fluent.html

1-2 years won't be sufficient I guess....

4 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Exogenopy
Exogenopy
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Of course, it depends. If you speak French a lot with good French speakers, if you travel a lot in the country. You could improve very fast. The article is funny and true by the way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrenchCrazy

Hi, I'm John from FrenchCrazy and I wrote that article. I'm not trying to discourage people at all, I'm just trying to paint a true picture about fluency. Although it is possible to make great leaps of progress in months, that often requires great amount of exposure and effort on your part :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sameera1405

Yeah, it'll be good if we get to go to France or any French-speaking countries after learning French. It'll make us remember French words for life :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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For me, that article is pretty much spot on. I'm just beginning French, but I'm about B2/C1 in Spanish. I studied Spanish for 3 years in high school and got to a solid A2. Minored in it in college, including one summer study abroad, and achieved a solid B1 or very low B2. Then neglected it and regressed mightily. I've been re-studying on my own for 3 or 4 years now and I'd say I'm at a solid B2/C1. Beginners think I'm fluent but I know I'm not. Sometimes when I'm well rested and have done a lot of Spanish, I can be "fluent". I'm flirting with fluency, but I do make mistakes.

My goal in French is to complete the Duolingo tree in 12-18 months, but I'm willing to take two years if I have to; I want to be able to complete timed practice sessions the whole way through the tree and for me that means a LOT of review.

By the time I finish the tree I'll probably be listening to music, slow podcasts, and reading short articles on news websites. I'll probably add flashcards and adolescent books after I finish the tree and maybe do the reverse tree.

I figure I'll be ready to visit Quebec in about 3-4 years :)

These folks who post "I finished my tree in 2 months!" and are at level 11 just blow my mind.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sameera1405

All the very best...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jared573271
Jared573271
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Three Years Later ... Are you ready for Quebec yet? :)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/purplewater

You sound like me. Have you gone abroad yet?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LinuxTak
LinuxTak
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Thank You, Lrtward. I loved your experiences and plans for French fluency. Here's a lingot for you :P

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Captainthelast

You probably don't devote All your time to duolingo or language learning, thats why., and there is nothing wrong with that. I've been studying German non stop 8-12 hours a day for a month and a half (I use different accounts because I like to start the tree from scratch once a week.) And I can easily see me being finished by now of I didn't review so much, but even with my reviews, duolingo won't last me another 2 months. It gets easier and easier especially since I am reading and listening to German outside duolingo. I will be fluent in 9 months easy and I will be C1 by this time next year. It doesn't by a my mind people can finish a tree in 2 months. They probably devoted a their time to it and didn't do any reviews or start over like I do. I'm sure their German is OK but I bet I will have a much better command of the German I have at the end. By the way my step dad us French and my not her became fluent in 1 year. And she is a high school drop out who couldn't tell you what a verb for is or how to turn on a computer, she simply devoted ALL her time to learning. If learning is important to you try not doing anything else in your free time for a month straight and see how much of a difference you notice. It's not magic. Just self discipline. I promise. I've seen it first hand. It's not that it's easy. It can be very hard but hard doesn't mean it takes more than a year. to be semi-fluent.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
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Good point regarding how much time a person has available to them. I was definitely considering things only from my own perspective. I struggle to get in one hour per day between work and home commitments. Sometimes I do more on weekends. But my time is definitely limited. I just can't get in more during the week if I want to stay employed, married, and healthy, lol.

I do think you'll have a great command of German the way you're starting over and utilizing outside resources. Finishing the tree is great, but at the end of the day I am here to learn the language, not to check off some "Hey, I did this!" kind of thing on a bucket list. Sounds like you have the same goal as me.

I don't mean to imply in any way that plowing through the tree is bad, it's just not what I am personally after. Many folks want a quick exposure to the language or languages and that's all they want, and that's okay.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Captainthelast

Completely agree. People often forget in these discussions that people have different lifestyles that may allow them to log several more hours than others learning a language and your right, some people will simply finish quicker because they have more time to devote to it. Also there are people who just want to know the gist of it and can finish it record time because they aren't learning the grammar behind the concepts and are just memorizing the course. Kind of like cramming for a test. They will recall a lot for a while but not as much as the people who actually studied. Because their goal was to pass the test, not understand and remember everything they put on the rest.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sameera1405

Exactly...it depends on a lot of factors..

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sameera1405

Yeah....it's not like you cram for a test and forget what you've learnt. I often hear many people telling this to me 'I don't remember French anymore'. Learning any language can take a few years, provided you are ready to invest some time daily in learning the vocabulary.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hildaoquendo

This depends on the time and effort you put into it. I am absolutely certain that you could become fluent in 6 to 12 months. But you can't just rely on Duolingo. You have to dedicate a few hours to studying daily.. Verbs, adjectives, conjugations, podcasts, speaking, writing, etc etc. Get some textbooks, use online learning tools, listen to music, watch french movies (with french subtitles).. It will help a great deal, I promise.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamHansen
SamHansen
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It can take months to years depending on how much time you put into studying it and if you are immersed. Fluency can't be achieved without speaking the language, so the more you speak it, the more you will improve (even if you do make mistakes). Age and motivation also play a role. Music is great too. You might not catch much at first, but as you progress you will understand more and more.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hasen6
Hasen6
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Well anyone measuring language learning time in years or months is just plain wrong. It has to be measured in hours. One person can do in a few months what another takes several years to do. That's the difference between half an hour a day (perhaps not even every day) to someone doing 8 hours a day or more. It all comes down to maths in the end.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingpen2

10,000 Hours to be a pro at any-ting

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anthony1021

I would say 2 years min.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahmadmoh4

Hey there i am in grade 11 and jave been taking french in school since grade 1 so 11 years now and last summer i somehow forgot the whole language lol and then i cam on duolingo did some practice and now im mothee nature again since i also live in canada so to the new learners out there ... dont give up because its a beautiful language

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/myers1919
myers1919
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Sharing an experience: immersion is obviously the best way to learn any language, and you can become fluent freakishly fast if you work at it. I have learned more Russian in the three weeks I've lived here than I had in three years of university education combined with rigorous independent study. I just started duolingo a few days ago as an extra tool, and it's been a breeze moving through the levels since the people with whom I work speak it to me every day now. I'm even already able to go on dates and converse without any English.

The short version: if you can go abroad, go.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShivamMish577381

I will welcome any recommendations for books that I can supplement my French learning with

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charliep13

depends a lot on age and number of people speaking it around you. when i was 8 my family went to france for 2 weeks and i was fluent by the first friday! now i'm 15 and i've been learning french in school since i was 9, on an english speaking island, and i can say "hi, i am green rubber snail." in french, badly.

4 years ago