"Their elephant drinks milk."

Translation:Il loro elefante beve il latte.

May 22, 2013

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/s2chmetterling

I didn't know that when i used "loro", "suo", etc I should change the article "L'" to "il"...

May 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/mukkapazza

An easy rule to memorize: the apostrophe doesn't go before a consonant :)

May 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/M.A.T.E.K

I put bevono for the loro form, but they said it should be beve for the lui/lei form?? What??

January 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/paulpureswag

Because it's a single elephant who drinks milk, there Lui/lei beve :) If there were two or more elephants you'd us "bevono"

May 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sammers04

There is only one elephant so it is beve (he/she/it drinks),

May 2, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Bpainter

The last sentence I put Il loro and it marked me wrong...said it should just be Loro ....so this sentence I put just Loro and it marked me wrong again. What's up with that? I think they got it wrong on the last page. It always should be Il Loro right?

March 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Chuckstarrrr

From what I have figured out:

Il loro, I loro, La loro, Le loro = Their

Loro sono = They ("Loro" used when dealing with people only)

Sono = "They" when dealing with anything other than people

I think my head is going to explode!

March 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/xyphax

Chuck, sono is first person singular and third person plural conjugation for the verb essere

http://www.verbix.com/webverbix/Italian/essere.html

so:
io sono l'uomo = I am the man
loro sono gli uomini = they are the men
hope that helps

March 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Chuckstarrrr

Cool, thanks :)

My examples were for when "sono" is used for "They are". You apparently drop the "Loro" in that situation. At least that is what I understood so far, from a previous question.

I should have made that clear, oops :)

March 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/xyphax

No problem. Yes, the personal pronoun as a subject is usually omitted. In fact, my two examples, to be accurate, should actually be 'sono l'uomo' and 'sono gli uomini', and as you can see, it is possible to determine whether the personal pronoun is singular or plural based on the rest of the sentence, this is often the case.

March 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Chuckstarrrr

Excellent, thanks for confirming what I edu-guessed at :D

March 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/xyphax

See the link I posted below that shows what the rules are for omitting the article. In general, it is omitted when it refers to a singular family relationship, like my mother, or your father, or her husband, etcetera. So it is quite likely that perhaps you had a sentence like:

Your mother cuts garlic = tua madre taglia l'aglio

in the current sentence then the article is required. ;-)

March 29, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/vega.marle

The same :/

September 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AriadnaPin11

I'm confused. I put "il loro elefante bevono latte" but it marked it wrong...why is that? Why is it "elefante beve il latte"?

April 6, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/heather.erica

Why do I need the il before latte? It's not the milk. When is it okay to drop the modifier?

March 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/xyphax

In Italian, the article is most often used than not, even when in English it is dropped to make a general statement. You can see this page for the rules about dropping articles when referring to singular family members.

http://www.arnix.it/free-italian/italian-grammar/possessive-adjectives-in-italian.php

March 23, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/AndyHurwor

Who the heck owns an elephant?

July 10, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/vega.marle

¡ No! A veces dicen que no se usa el artículo, como en español.

September 22, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/FreshPrince696

Drinks milk = beve latte? Isnt it right? I got corrected, bc didnt write "il"

May 15, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/firestorm458

It didn't say "the" milk it jut said milk. How am i supposed to know when to use il or not?!

September 27, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/pyraptor

There's no way to know if the sentence means that it drinks milk in general or that is drinking like this milk, (beve latte vs beve il latte) ?

May 31, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/dorsey13

why is it "il" not "i"

June 11, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/torino44

il = singular i = plural

July 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/paulcosta4

why do you need the article?

January 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/Frenchy90210

Because that's the rule. Why do you not in English? (because you don't!) :)

July 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/il_filippo

Ch'è più comune: 1) il loro elefante beve latte 2) il loro elefante beve il latte

April 15, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/robertocatini

Definetely the second :)

August 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/JoshuaSugar

I cant understand why it is not "le loro elefante" (The "e" at the end of the words go together just like everything else) Its only with loro is there an exception that you cant follow?? Please help.

December 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/261097tina

Why can't I use "Il suo elefante.."?

January 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/MadelynWri

I wrote "Il suo elefante" rather than "Il loro elefante" because in English 'their' can be used in place of 'his/her' if you don't know the person's gender. Will report as I think this should be accepted.

May 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Anne820307

"Their" was not in the English sentence.

August 12, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/Emil2Sinclair

why is it: "il loro elefante beve latte" and not "loro elefante beve latte"? is the article really necessary?

February 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/Sfloresta

the difference between loro and suo is NOT GENDER they are both masculine The difference is singular verses plural (their is plural, his is singular)

September 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/NicholasAdderley

Why is "il" at the beginning?

June 21, 2019
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