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"You must have come here as a child."

Translation:Tienes que haber venido aquí de niño.

5 years ago

42 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MeganJ27

Why not "como nino?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-Alvina-

I think with "como", "as" would mean "like". "like a child", rather than "when (you were) a child".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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What -Alvina- said is correct. You can say de niño or cuando (eras) niño.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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I also ased "como un niño" Wonder if any one can tell me why it is wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/speedier

I made the same mistake, but I believe that Alvina is right:

http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=as%20a%20child

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rajennagar

Not using 'deber de'? I thought this meant the equivalent to the English 'must'?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

It's complicated Deber, tener, etc. I'm slowly getting used to the usage too but I know from experience that in Spanish when you're talking almost rhetorically, Spanish uses tener almost every time. ex, You must have come here before. +++++ Must sometimes means obligation, sometimes supposition, just like tener, depending on the tense and context. Must have come however is supposition only, not obligation, as in tener que haber venido. The stronger must come indicating obligation - is tener que venir. for ex. Tienes que venue a mi fiesta la próxima semana. You must / ought / have to come to my party next week. +++++ Deber is a whole different story but IMO it indicates a more urgent obligation for instance, ¡Debes decirme! (who is responsible for my son's death) or Debes tomar este medicamento o morirás. You have to take this medicine or you will die. Hope this helps!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sk1ph1x
sk1ph1x
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chaolan77 that does not sound completely correct. By the way duolingo does also in this case accept the translation "debes haber venido agui de nino".

The many uses of deber are too many to explain here in this forum. I would suggest checking out Spanishdict.com http://www.spanishdict.com.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sbkirkwood
sbkirkwood
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What part does not sound completely correct? This statement is vague and not particularly helpful, especially since this is a confusing subject (well, for me at least!).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonnycc
jonnycc
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More sentences like this please Duolingo! I like the sentences that make us think a bit, and teach us new phrases and uses of words.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LowTide3L
LowTide3L
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Why is it 'haber venido" and not "has venido"? I looked through the comments and didn't find my same question.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gbrettin

"Tienes que" is already conjugated second person informal, so "has" would be redundant conjugation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pavillanue

if someone could give a more precise response? i still don't get it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Lucky for us, only one verb in a string in a clause or sentence is conjugated, is what I understand. The rest have to be invinitives or perhaps gerands...that's what I understood.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/periquitapiupiu

"Debiste haber venido aquí de niño" is more commonly said among Spanish-speaking people, but that is considered wrong here.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

"Debiste" means you should have come somewhere, "tienes que", in this context, means that the person that's speaking things it's doubtful that you had never come there. Like: "tienes que haber jugado con la pelota alguna vez" (you must have played with the ball sometime).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beadspitter

I agree that that's what this sentence means in English. Essentially, 'I can't believe you didn't come here as a child.' My question is, is that actually idiomatic Spanish?

I'm surprised by the directness of translation - this sentence could have been idiomatically correct in English as "You have to have come here as a child", which would parse 'tener que' exactly. I was already interested simply that 'tener que' and 'have to' translated so closely; I would never have guessed that the idiom would have gone this far in parallel.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carter.ag
carter.ag
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The use of deber makes this sentence more like "You should have" rather than "You must have." It is good to know what to say so we'll sound more like regular Spanish speakers but I guess Duo wants to make sure we know our "Tener que" phrases really well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chaolan77

Just because it's spoken doesn't make it correct. Call me a perfectionist but I'd prefer to learn the somewhat awkward 'grammatically correct' sentence before learning colloquial usage.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

I think most of us would like to know both - what is grammatically correct but also what IS used colloquially - so that we can understand what people are saying to us and probably how we would answer back if that is how the language is being used. It would be equivalent to never using colloquial english in our everyday lives, which doesn't happen.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Nobody said that was colloquial usage, the sentence "debiste haber venido aquí de niño" is perfectly correct.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Your sentence is perfectly correct, in Spanish deber and deber de are both used for suppositions, which is what the English sentence is. I don't know why anybody would use tener que here.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

Good to know, thank you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/montyjoham
montyjohamPlus
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Permiteme preguntarle una pregenta, por favor: Would "Tuviste que haber venido" be acceptable? I will give you a lingot or two if you if you would like such a thing, but perhaps the joy of teaching and sharing knowledge is enough for you,

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/will.burke

I only chose "niño" not "niña" because it asked for CHILD not GIRL, yet I was marked wrong....am I correct??

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/baisa

a girl is a child. child is not a gendered word in english, so it could be translated as either niño or niña in spanish, depending on the child in question

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamob544
adamob544
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Nino is a boy / child right? So isnt nina just a girl, and not a child?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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Looking at my dictionary it seems Niña can also be child.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jagmicker

When did "nina" become child? That's the 1st time I've been told that! I was told it was only "nino".:-(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luvlearning

Jamicker...Niño is the masculine form and niña is the feminine form. Niños would include both males and females and niña only females. Since we don't know which gender the sentence is referring to both could be correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nueby
nueby
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Debes de haber venido aquí de niño. Rejected/reported 30 August 2014. To me the modals remain the most frustratingly underdeveloped Spanish grammar feature on Duo. Yes, it is free, and yes, we have to rely on other sources to advance.

Speaking of which, B&B 21.3.2: Deber de can only express probability or supposition, although deber alone is nowadays also used with this meaning: Debiste (de) llegar tarde. You must have arrived late. Debe (de) haber sido muy guapa. She must have been very beautiful.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I find the expression of this using "tener que" extremely peculiar. It's not exactly wrong -- it's a legitimate translation -- but it's translating a seriously weird interpretation of the English. Tener que is mostly expressing necessity (in whatever time frame is determined by the conjugation). The "must" in this English sentence does not mean anything remotely like, "It's important / necessary that you have come here as a child." It is, as you say, probability or supposition. "Deber de" is clearly the best choice in Spanish, with "deber" with no "de" is possible because of the modern grammatical slippage you describe.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wtoddk
wtoddk
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"tienes que haber venido aqui de pequeno" is correct also

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joeyfino

Why the haber? Can't it just be Tienes que venido

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MeleeNess23
MeleeNess23
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Tienes que would make the sentence mean "You have to come here as a child."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joeyfino

Got it! Thank you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Russ_Eaton
Russ_Eaton
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Why not has tenido que venir?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KhalidSabi
KhalidSabi
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That translates as: "You have had to come". Slightly different meaning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cheryl1
Cheryl1
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Why is ''de niño'' used here instead of como un niño? I searched and searched and cannot find an example with ''de'' meaning ''as''. Google translate (I know but I was desperate) accepts either.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dev_Bev

I always forget how to say "You must" ... SO simple! I was wondering how "de nino" makes sense. Obviously it's not a literal translation, but "of child" or "from child" is hard to conceptualize, and therefore remembering it in the future will be difficult.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Marie282520

Sometimes on a forum, i answer a question I looked up and then going back, I have to read my own explanation and all the others to get it a second time. Second time is often harder. Very long process to make language automatic.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/siqizhang1

Now DACA is ending. Sad.

1 year ago