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"Here is where you eat."

Translation:Aquí es donde tú comes.

5 years ago

59 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/peterose
peterose
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should estar be used instead of ser since it is a location?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

I'm pretty sure it's because "here is where you eat" is using "here" in its sense as a pronoun ("this place") as opposed to its sense as an adverb ("located in this place"). The sentence is a statement of the identity of two things ("this place" and "where you eat"). For expressing "to be" in the sense of identity, rather than condition, you use "ser."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1

Yes, i completely agree. The sentence defines 'here', and is not stating its location. (Ie, 'here is the kitchen' would use estar. 'The kitchen is where we cook meals' isn't locational, but definitional, and would use 'ser'. 'Here is where we cook meals' is equivalent to the latter.)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lhamby

The only problem with that explanation is that this sentence is in the quiz specifically named "Adverbs."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nnaatthhaannx2

That's what I thought!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dhaas70

It is possible, but not likely. Consider that estar usually refers to a temporary place or condition. If the place you eat is your kitchen, how often does the kitchen move? There may be better ways to indicate a temporary eating place such as "Vamos a comer aqui por esta noche". But for this example I think ser is the best choice

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1

Please lose the concept "temporary", particularly with location. You would use 'estar' if you were located at a several million years old rock formation. Period. Location. Nothing to do with permanancy.

'Ser' is used above because the sentence is definitional. 'Here' isn't AT a location, 'here' is being defined.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duohablo

Estar is also used when talking about location. Therefore estar would make more sense when you have a word such as "donde" (where). Por ejemplo, "Donde esta ud.?" Where are you?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeanette525

Exactly. If you ask where the library is, you use estar, even though the library isn't moving. So why ser here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1

It isn't asking where, it's definitional. It's like saying 'the library is where you read books'. You'd use 'ser'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan5Dan

Dhaas70 Thanks for that explanation!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulZurin

but if the kitchen is where you eat today, and tomorrow, the dining room, then the kitchen becomes a temporary eating place.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/geneven
genevenPlus
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This is where you eat could be pointing to a rock, not necessarily to your kitchen. You might never see that rock again.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeromeWill

I thought the same thing

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/samay93

What is the difference between dónde and donde?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anybakke

Use dónde when asking a question and donde when making a statement.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kassandra8286
kassandra8286
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Also wondering why es and not estas is used in this sentence.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ohadzr
ohadzr
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Why should I say "comes" and not "come"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

"Comes" is the second person singular informal conjugation. "Come" is second person formal or third person, so you don't use it with "tú." "Used come" would be fine.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vinca6

Surely 'here' is a location - why not estar ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lori10

A form of ser is used when one is stating where an "event" is taking place, as opposed to stating where someone or something can be found. Another example would be, "La fiesta es a mi casa."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chloew1989

Could you also say "La fiesta es en mi casa."? And what if it's a sofa instead of a party? Would you use estar? La sofa esta (with an accent over the a) en mi casa?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lori10

Yes to both!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Russ_Eaton
Russ_Eaton
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I thought it is an event where tickets are given? This does not seem to be an event of any sort. Can anyone else expand on this estar vs ser?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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I have exactly the same question; I didn't think eating is an event like, say, fiesta.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Russ, I agree; it's confusing! It is like someone showing a new student where the campus cafeteria is, which I interpret as a definite location. Certainly not an event!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dhaas70

I used "Aqui es lo que comes' - am I way off on my understand of when to use "lo que"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Deutschtiger
Deutschtiger
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Lo que actually translates as "what".

Lo que me dijo es una mentira: What he told me is a lie.

It can also mean "that which", which also makes sense when you plug it in the sentence instead of "what".

That which he told me is a lie.

I hope that clarified things!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineAnn

I think this translates as "This is what you eat"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dhaas70

ahhh - yes... I can see that now... thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/steck11

Could somebody here please help me with why it should be "usted come" instead of "usted coma?" Thank you

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1

Because the verb ends with -er, rather than -ar. -ir verbs will act like -er ones as well.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christin.p1

The conjugation for usted+ comer is come... yo como, tu comes, el/ella/usted come..

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elcazador1967

What is wrong with '' Usted come aqui ''

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lhmezzo

I put "se come" not as reflexive, but in the same sense as "aqui se habla espanol." (Sorry, no extended characters or accents on my phone.) I was marked wrong. Should this be reported as an error?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/slothy2964

How you feel or where you are, always use the verb estar.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joyce938935

"Aquí es donde se come" now why is "se" wrong? Ive never seen "ud" in a sentence before.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JustJake9672
JustJake9672
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Why is this comes and not come?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JahnawiMar

When do you use 'a donde'? It was a possible translation for where.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wesley103092

"Aquí es donde come." is the translation I have recieved, is there another way to say this?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wesley103092

"Aquí es donde come." is the translation I have recieved, is there another way to say this?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wesley103092

Hi

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wesley103092

Hi

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AngieKing6

Why "es" instead of "esta(accent)"? I have learned that estar is used for location, except where an event takes place, in which case you use ser. I think of where one eats as a location, not where an "event" takes place...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GalaxySky4

Aqui esta donde tu come. i think that is how you do it

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gregorio_Blanco

Why is "esta" not accepted?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RenKaiser0

i thought "estar" is used when places are involved

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NobleLanguage

Why is it not "está"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gatoblanco26

Yikes!!! I thought estar was always used with location...estoy muy confundida!!!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bethx_xfield

Difference between tú and usted?

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simsolo

Spanish speakers use tú and usted, which both mean “you,” to convey the formality of a relationship. Tú is less formal than usted. You use tú when you're talking to someone of the same age, the same rank, or the same educational level. (Spanish Dict.)

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simsolo

Why was 'Aqui es donde su come' rejected?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NobleLanguage

Because "su" means "his/her". You've translated the sentence as "Here is where his eats".

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simsolo

Thank you. I thought it was the formal 'you' as well, but looking it up on Spanish Dict. I see it includes 'your' not 'you'. Another detail sorted on the path to Spanish!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GranBocadillo
GranBocadillo
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Could any of these work? Aquí ha donde tú comes. Aquí hay donde tú comes. Aquí está donde tú comes.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NobleLanguage

No, as: -"ha" translates to has in the sense of the perfect tense, if you were to use this you would be saying "Here has where you eat". -"hay" means "there is", so this would mean "Here there is where you eat". -"estar" is not used in this example as the place you are eating is assumed to not be temporary. Whilst you are talking about a location, it is a permanent one and therefore "ser" would be used.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GranBocadillo
GranBocadillo
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I just thought that "hay" or "ha" could work because i have heard peopel use "he aquí" to mean here is.

"¿Sabes dónde están mis papels?" "Sí, he aquí tus papels"

"Do you know where my papers are?" "Yes, here they are."

Usually people use this meaning that it is something they have. Like if you ask someone in a store where something is, they will usually walk you over to it and say something like "Here it is", I believe that it is similar to this. I'm not sure if this translation is correct, or if it would transfer to this situation at all either. But this is my reasoning behind it.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BradfordSt

Es is eternal! So wrong!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

Duration has nothing to do with the distinction between "ser" and "estar." You'll be better off forgetting that anybody ever told you that.

3 years ago