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"Los cargos"

Translation:The charges

5 years ago

42 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/noamdt

one of the hints is "posts". my answer "the posts" was rejected. Porque?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stalthdan

Off topic, but when asking a question, it should be ¿Por qué?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/veatchr
veatchr
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a few questions ago, "post" was not only the first hint for "cargo," it was the correct answer when I mistranslated it as "cargo" How would you say "the posts" in Spanish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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Los puestos.

The nuances of a few of these words are confusing to me as well. Puesto is a job position, or a military post. (El poste is the wooden pole type of post.)

Los cargos means "charges", but in terms of responsibility, such as "you are in charge of this. This is in your charge. This is your charge." (the latter seems more British to me). So, it too can be "your post".

And then there is the verb colocar, which means "to put, position (something somewhere)", but I'm mainly translating that one as "co-locate". To put something at a location.

We have all these nuances in English as well, of course. I find it easiest to be aware of the root/etymology and choose between them that way.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackStewart0

No help here, but post is one of those words that has many meanings. Like a post for a fence, or posting the mail, or being on a guard post, or posting an announcement. That there are many different types of posts might be why it doesn't easily translate.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/droma
droma
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"post" should be accepted. I guess it is not in the duoligo database. You should report it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ajdemeo86

The charges was accepted. Is this charges like a credit card or like responsibilities?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kgkoon
kgkoon
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Responsibilities is the general sense. http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/cargo

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarolineWi9

Yes, but responsibilities isn't accepted :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ant885895
ant885895
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Caroline,

I see you have a high level and long streak so I know you are smart.

You wrote "responsibities isn't". The commenter above you wrote "responsibilities is". The commenter above that wrote "the charges was".

Why aren't these "responsibilites aren't" "responsibilities are" "the charges were"?

Isn't, is, was = singular in English?

Have I lost an exception rule or is this really 3 mistakes in a row? I hope it will not be offensive to inquire. I do not intend that.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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They are talking about the words themselves. If you imagine quotation marks around those words, it will make more sense. "responsibilities" isn't accepted ... "The charges" was accepted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ant885895
ant885895
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Barbara,

Thank you.

I don't know how I did that. Some time all the rules in English seem over whelming and distract me from better thinking.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Like speakers of any language, anglohablantes can be sloppy with their grammar rules.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cringy

There was no sloppy English there. Barbaramorris explained it well in a previous reply.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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the answer is not "responsibilities", hence "responsibilities" is not accepted.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BaconChomper
BaconChomper
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Charges like criminal charges also

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CMcV1
CMcV1
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Can "cargo" in spanish be transled to "cargo" in english (like the cargo on the ship)?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuevesHuevos

Looks like (english) cargo is "carga" in Spanish. http://www.wordreference.com/es/translation.asp?tranword=cargo

Cargo (in Spanish) means a bunch of different things, but not cargo (english) :) http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=cargo

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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talón de cargo is "bill of lading" - a list of things being shipped commercially. Cargo also means "charge" in the sense that a nanny has her "charge" - the child she must look after - "cargo" is the thing you which you are responsible for looking after. While Spanish doesn't seem to directly translate cargo to "cargo", it's pretty easy to see where English "cargo" comes from.

Also, "cargo" applies to the charge on a battery, it seems.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/runnerbos
runnerbos
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Why is it that cargo means position and cargos means accusations?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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cargo means both position and accusation, and cargos means both positions and accusations. Depends on the context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fanatou

post, position (empleo)

<pre>ocupa un cargo muy importante -&gt; she holds a very important position o post alto cargo -&gt; top manager; (persona) (en empresa) high-ranking official (en la Administración) cargo público </pre>
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fanatou

formular graves cargos contra alguien -> to bring serious charges against somebody

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lunabeams

los cargos "beep beep where am I?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Metlieb
Metlieb
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Can someone give me an example for a charge? Does it mean the electrical charge or the juridical one?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BaconChomper
BaconChomper
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Criminal charge or positional charge. In my opinion* we don't commonly use charge to refer to someones job or position with English these days but it is still valid.

Dave was charged with watching the kids while we are gone. Dave is in charge.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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Well said. But I think "charge" is still used in British and Australian English. I had never heard it that way, but my Aussie husband was like, "oh yeah, absolutely."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cringy

Aussie here, we commonly use "in charge of", and "charged with [a duty or task]" less commonly but it's not at all strange.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Here in Canada too.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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Both of those are common in US English. I think it's 'charge' as a noun ("I have a charge', 'my charge',...) that I find strange.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cringy

If you are charged with looking after a child, the child is your charge (and is also in your charge).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/17jclela

I put "the loads" and it was counted wrong. The verb "cargar" means "to load." Help?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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"La carga" means "the load". "El cargo" means "the charge". (Although for maximum confusion, I see that "la carga" means "the charge" in the context of an explosion.)

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/load http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/charge

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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"For maximum confusion". That makes it sounds purposeful :-D

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EquanimousLingo
EquanimousLingo
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For my example cargos meant accusations.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NumberDuo

That is another translation, yes. "Accusations" as in judicial charges.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterStaal

refering to all my three disctionaries is the Spanish "cargo" in English also cargo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EntourageEffect

Accusations was the answer it wanted (it's the activity where the words are there but you have to put thwem in order) but that was not on the drop down list. Reporting it.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blackarican121

This wasn't even under the definitions

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/logstoned

i have a feeling this will come in handy :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MillicentP7

How are accusations and positions the same thing

1 year ago