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  5. "Passa la pasta!"

"Passa la pasta!"

Translation:Pass the pasta!

August 23, 2014

28 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xyphax

Perhaps my favorite sentence in all of Italian duoLingo. Can't think of many things I would rather say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DeanG6

Can't wait to use it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ivan.is.here

The snake is in the boot?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joeybemate

A friend of mine was sitting at a table at a church lunch, and seized the opportunity to use the phrase "pass the pasta past the pastor." Everyone was in awe.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/glumleaf

say that ten times fast


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash.Purple

Pasta pasta pasta pasta x10


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HydraBianca

The audio is just great.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skywalker735

i like the how it's spoken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emmyllu

I've noticed that despite the direct address of these imperative forms, the verbs are in the 3rd person. Is there an inherent reason? Or is it just the quirks of the language? Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nullusaum

It depends on the verb's ending how you form the imperatives but there are always two* options: an informal ("tu") and a formal ("Lei"). In most cases it is safe to stick to the indicative forms, like in "veni qui" vs. "venga qui", with the formal version of course being third person.

However, for verbs ending in -are, this is somehow reverted. Thus, "scusi" is the formal and "scusa" the informal imperative of "scusare" and you use the third person for second and vice versa.

See more: http://italian.about.com/library/weekly/aa011900a.htm

(* Plus the "let us" type of first person plural imperative which is easily formed by using the corresponding indicative form.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZDanielle

Thanks for soecifically mentioning the "scusi" being the formal version and why because I had always wondered about that and I think it will help me remember that the -are verbs are the exception.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dessie464019

I've also wondered why "scusi" is the formal way to address someone as opposed to "scusa" and even asked a couple of native speakers for some input but I finally found my answer here. Thank you! Now I understand the logic behind it :0)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaaiVipra

Thank you so much!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DanielNicolae15

Pass the pasta on the left hand side!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sollihein

This has got to be the most Italian sentence in the whole tree


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ash.Purple

Maybe i'm going to write an Italian rap song with this


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EthanGraha3

I bet someone felt reeeaallllyyyy clever writing that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fabulous-Feli

This is the only sentence i will need


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ella_Wren

Please do. I wuv pasta!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarissaS103

The most important sentence in the Italian language


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MissMirshamsi

That's funny. In Spanish and catalan slang this sentence could literally mean something like: Give me the money.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jonasrre

That sound likes the most common phrase in Italian. haha


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hannah151986

Fav sentence so far :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bilingual9937

I wrote "Pass over the pasta!" and Duolingo said my answer couldn't be accepted...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jared_Is_Cool

Finally! The sentence I've been searching for!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertWill713455

At the normal speed she includes a "t" sound, like "pasta la pasta" or "basta la pasta"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clairelanc3

And not "passi la pasta" here? I try to find a rule. Would it be "passa il caffė " or "passi"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clairelanc3

Nullusaum thanks a lot. So it is rather " would you be so kind as to pass me the salt"( passi) and "the pasta here, quick (passa)?

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