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"El agua es escasa."

Translation:The water is scarce.

5 years ago

64 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/RobertFairless

escasa = scarce, scant or limited. Why mark 'limited' incorrect?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VaRee

At least u got a hint. They gave zero drop menu and it was the first time I had ever seen it. Tht is my one problem with DL

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JodieLock

How are you meant to learn a new word if you only want words you haven't seen?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
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Yes for scant = escasa, but not for limited (see smurinson's question) The dictionary doesn't know we talk about a natural resource, maybe "limited" can be perfect synonym of "scarce" in other contexts.

http://www.linguee.com/english-spanish/search?source=autoquery=scant

"Scant" should be accepted in my opinion, but not "limited". (see below)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johncaveishere

I used Scant because it is a word that is far too underused in English imo, and it marked me wrong :/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/singingsoprano

Not because it's wrong but because it's underused. Report it if it is valuable to you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johnarnold
johnarnold
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esta and es; in this lesson set Duolingo gives us three sentences

El agua es escasa

El arroz está escaso de sal. La fruta está escasa.

scarce does not have a lot of double meanings.

So when do you use es and when esta with the word escasa?

DL seems consistent in most other cases.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RAMOSRAUL

you may want to have a look here: http://duolingo.com/#/comment/258188

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/QuintanillaJon

Thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Louisa.Crane

when you talk about food/meals, use estar. (not always but about meals.) Cómo está la sopa? (how's the soup) answer: "Está escasa de sal" (it needs more salt/doesn't have enough salt etc) La sopa en Chile es rica (The soup in Chile is delicious)

(this is my understanding at least)

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes. If you are talking about the plate of food in front of you, needing salt is a condition that can be easily remedied by adding it. But you do have the question wrong. The question would still be Cómo es la sopa. And if your answer were delicious, you would not use estar. You would say Es rica/deliciosa. Like elsewhere it comes down to condition vs characteristic. Hot, cold, salty, etc are conditions when they refer to a particular plate of food. Healthy, delicious vegetarian would be characteristics. Of couse salty is a characteristic of certain foods like sardines, so when generalizing ser is used.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/redteapotter

I am not sure that "The water is scarce" is correct English. I would say "water is scarce" or "the water is in short supply"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

You have a point.

However, I said "water is scarce" and was accepted.

Spanish uses "el" before words used as general terms, much more than does English.

"Water is in short supply" would be "el agua escasea"

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Yes. Making generalizations about things is the major sticking point about the use of the definite article. It is always used in Spanish to generalize and never used in English. But most statements that are generalizations can also not be. They could be talking about a specific subset of the whole which would require the definite article in both languages. So Duo should, and generally does, accept answers with or without the definite article.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DannyDannyDanny

"agua" ends in "a" but it is still masculine, because we say "el agua", verdad? Why then do we say agua "es escasa" instead of "es escaso"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hannahrrrr

No, agua is feminine. The only reason el is used with it is because it begins with a vowel (and el agua is much easier to say than la agua). The same thing happens in French. And obviously we say 'es escasa' because agua is feminine and we need to agree with it :)

5 years ago

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Yes, In French. Une âme (feminine noun) = A soul.
Son = possesive for masculine noun. Sa = possessive for femine noun. So, normally you would say "sa âme", if you want to say "his soul" or "her soul" (because the possessive changes in French according to the gender of the noun, and not the gender of the owner, as in English)

And it's wrong, because "sa âme" has a problematic pronunciation. So, we change it in "son âme". The possessive "son" should be for masculine noun, but "âme" remains feminine (because genders can't change, they are permanent)

It's the same thing in Spanish, "agua" was infortunate to be a feminine noun beginning with the letter "a".

If there's a linguist here, I don't remember how this linguistic phenomenon is called.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phrontistery
Phrontistery
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Use "escasa" because agua is feminine: Agua is always feminine, even in singular form. However, to avoid the double 'a' sound in la agua, we use the article el in singular form. In all other respects, agua is still feminine when singluar. The same is true for other feminine nouns that begin with an accented 'a'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smurinson

still, i don't understand why "limited " is not accepted - there are situations when water is limited, and the word "limited" is one of the given meanings, so what is the problem?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Limited makes sense here.

4 years ago

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I searched for the translation of "Water is limited" on Linguee, but I've only found "El agua es limitada"

"As clear that when water is limited (and costly), farmers tend to apply deficit irrigation and get higher income. "
"Se vio claramente que cuando el agua es limitada (y costosa),, los agricultores tienden a aplicar el riego deficitario y tener un mayor ingreso."

"Water is limited, it is polluted and there are many conflicts that are growing in the agriculture sector."
"El agua es limitada, está contaminada y existen muchos conflictos que están creciendo en la agricultura."

"During the rainy season, water is polluted, and drinkable water is limited."
"En la temporada de las lluvias, se contamina el agua, y el agua potable se infecta."

"The water is limited, but it can go around and be presented endlessly. " = "El agua es limitada, pero puede dar muchas vueltas y se presenta infinitamente."

After reading that, I don't think "limited" is always "scarce", but means the water can't be renewed. (The water is not a scarce resource here, in these examples about agriculture, only a limited one)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Duo wants you to learn the basic, most common, meaning of a word. Thus, "escasa" = scarce.

If Duo wanted "limited" as an answer, they would have said "limitada."

One is much better off using the more common, the basic, meaning. Why search for more obscure meanings when the standard, common, basic meaning is available? Why fight it? Just learn.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/escaso

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaryMcC
MaryMcCPlus
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I absent mindedly wrote la agua and got told agua is masculine whicj is misleading.

It is feminine but uses el for ease of prnunciation.

I have reported the error.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertGenta

duolingo, based in southern california

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NickMalcol

El agua es escasa en California :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mroczk
Mroczk
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Two concerns. First, shouldn't it be "El agua es escaso?" Second, is this a straightforward adjective or a verb or both?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phrontistery
Phrontistery
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Use "escasa" because agua is feminine: Agua is always feminine, even in singular form. However, to avoid the double 'a' sound in la agua, we use the article el in singular form. In all other respects, agua is still feminine when singluar. The same is true for other feminine nouns that begin with an accented 'a'. "Agua" is a noun; "escasa" is an ajective.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JacquiFish

the water is limited should also be correct

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Casiquire

THE water is scarce? That's an odd sentence.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sarah86687

Some words always use THE first. It is Spanish, don't know why, but that's how it is.

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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It's not in the word, it's in the circumstances. Spanish and English use definite and indefinite articles similarly, but there are a couple of marked distinctions which confuse language students. Essentially Spanish uses the definite article more frequently and the indefinite article less frequently than English. Students learn fairly early to use the definite article before days of the week, when telling time, and with titles, but this use here is harder to recognize. In English we use the definite article to indicate the particular one or subset of the whole that we are referring to. The coffee on the table or the coffee of Columbia. But in English we never use the definite article when we are generalizing about something. If we say The coffee is strong we are talking about a particular batch, probably what you are currently drinking. But if you say Coffee is strong, any English speaker understands that you are generalizing about coffee in general, about "all" coffee. This last case, talking about the all in general terms, is where Spanish also uses the definite article. But you have to be careful to think about whether it is generalizing about the all or just making a general statement like I drink coffee in the morning. That would be Tomo café en la mañana. But in Spanish any noun with have either a definite or indefinite article in front of it if it is the subject of the sentence because either you are talking about any (a), a particular one or subset, or generalizing. So the bottom line is that ANY sentence which begins with él/la and a noun will translate either with or without that article. This sentence could be either The water is scarse in a situation where you were talking about a particular place or Water is scarse in general.

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IanWylie97

Hola hombres es Escasa aqui, y hoy yo tengo loco periodica hoy

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/itay_bi
itay_bi
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Does the word 'scarce' ,in general, has a negative meaning as 'limited' (and because of that not enogh)

or it can have also a positive meaning like 'rare' ( and because of that special and precious) like 'a scarce person', or 'sacrce diamond'

???

and the same question for the word 'escasa' :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

You can say "a rare person" (which is indeed positive) but not "a scarce person." You are correct in saying that "scarce" generally means not enough.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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ïn short supply" was not accepted. I complained, but I'm unsure if that is regional.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
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Synonymous given for "escaso/a":
scarce, in short supply, scant; limited; tight; little; low; slender; poor (but they don't all fit when referring to "water".

In my opinion, yes, "in short supply" is better than "limited", "short supply" is more precise than something like "limited supply" for instance.

"Potable water is in short supply" = scarce = escasa, en escasez

"When vaccine is in short supply, priority may be given to maintaining essential services"
"Si hay escasez de vacunas, quizá se dé prioridad al mantenimiento de los servicios esenciales"

http://www.linguee.es/ingles-espanol/traduccion/in+short+supply.html

"In short supply" should be accepted. Maybe we could also add the word "en escasez"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
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I guess: common < raro < escaso
Have you got some other words to definite quantities I could add?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/daisytuck

Scarce = limited! GRRRRRR :-(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JacquiFish

the water is limited should also be correct

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AchilleTal

This is the third problem I had with this particular module. Extremely frustrating. Limited is given a choice and not accepted. QUE ROLLO!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kimberlie14

"The water is limited" should be correct!!! UGH!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FatihEmreCan
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Duo use La fruta está escasa and La agua es escasa. I am confused

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GraceSlaws
GraceSlaws
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Why is it "es escasa" instead of "es escaso"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smurinson

La palabra "agua" es feminina, y "el"esta aqui para no repetir "a".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phrontistery
Phrontistery
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Use "escasa" because agua is feminine: Agua is always feminine, even in singular form. However, to avoid the double 'a' sound in la agua, we use the article el in singular form. In all other respects, agua is still feminine when singluar. The same is true for other feminine nouns that begin with an accented 'a'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkNeff727

"Es" for water, and "Esta" for fruit? uhhh

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/-LiamAnderson-
-LiamAnderson-
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es or esta?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Darknarf

The water is rare, not accepted??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gbyly6

I kept hearing viscasa so I thought the water was viscous

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonassonMIguel

Did a Californian put this in here?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MrAvailableName
MrAvailableName
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slowly walks from behind tree "Hey what's up guys"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/_MsLexi_
_MsLexi_
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What was "rare" not accepted in place of scarce? I was always taught that they were synonymous!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chalaco69

Because "agua" is masculine, why isn't it "El agua es escaso"?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Agua is not a masculine word. It is actually feminine. Feminine nouns which begin with an a or an ha in a stressed syllable take el and un in the singular. But any modifiers used will still be feminine and the plural form is still las aguas, although that it not commonly used. Other words like this include

el ama de casa the housewife

el asma asthma

el arca the ark

el águila the eagle

el hambre hunger

el hampa the underworld

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoanneBrown1

in the North West UK we say short of salt, the water is short!

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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That certainly a word you hear in the US as well, but not often as just a predicate adjective. I would say Water is in short supply, not just water is short. I'm short of (or on) salt would work. Probably scant should also work. But Duo does like to encourage learners to use the similar sounds of cognates to help them remember. That would make scarce or scant better choices, especially considering the number of second language English speakers learning Spanish. If course if Duo could improve their responses to wrong answers so only the more standard ones would show then it would cause less confusion when someone gets corrected with a term they would not use.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ccaangeboden

The water is scant -> answer is incorrect ? Still do not know why it is not "el agua es escaso"?

I have learned agua is from Greek word so it is masculine.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Phrontistery
Phrontistery
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Use "escasa" because agua is feminine: Agua is always feminine, even in singular form. However, to avoid the double 'a' sound in la agua, we use the article el in singular form. In all other respects, agua is still feminine when singluar. The same is true for other feminine nouns that begin with an accented 'a'.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lemmrz

Wrong!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EricGjovaag
EricGjovaag
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¡Bienvenidos a la planeta Arrakis!

2 years ago