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"Zij moedigen ons aan om drie dagen te fietsen."

Translation:They encourage us to bike three days.

4 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/lambertsimnel
lambertsimnelPlus
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Does this mean that they spend three days encouraging us to cycle, that they encourage us to spend three days cycling, or both?

Also, "...to bike three days" sounds so much less natural to me as a native British English speaker than "...to cycle for three days" that I wonder whether it's a mistake. Has anybody heard a native speaker say this?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThisYoungQuigs

Bike/Cycle/Ride are all regional choices. On the east coast of the US, you can say any of them and we'll know what you mean. But we usually use "to bike" :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lambertsimnel
lambertsimnelPlus
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Thanks. As for "bike three days" as opposed to "bike for three days", is that also regional? In my English dialect, we would always say "for three days" (but we would often omit the "for" when talking about distances instead of times).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gement
GementPlus
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My west coast US dialect would always include "for"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chanil5
Chanil5
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They encourage us to spend three days cycling. This is indicated by the word "om" which in this context means "they encourage us TO cycle".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ghostranch

I agree "to bike three days" sounds very unnatural and it doesn't make much sense, in my opinion. I think it should be "to bike for three days", otherwise the sentence would need to continue, such as "to bike three days a week".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jendefer
jendefer
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My dialect is US, East Coast/Mid-Atlantic, and it sounds fine to my ear to drop the "for". I hear people say it both ways (with or without "for") when referring to time and distance. We biked three miles. We biked three hours. We biked for three miles. We biked for three hours.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcuslangford

To them I say "on your bike."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TanguyDESMET

What's the problem with that phrase :"hey encourage us to ride for three days"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kai_E.
Kai_E.
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You're forgetting to mention "bikes" or "bicycles" in some way.

"to ride" could refer to any mode of transportation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/john.galla
john.galla
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I had a bit of trouble here because "to bike three days" sounds really unnatural (I'm an Irish speaker of English living in the UK). I'd be more inclined to say "to bike for three days".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielOd4

Is it necessary to use "aan"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jendefer
jendefer
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Yes, it is part of the verb, aanmoedigen (to encourage). This is one of those separable verbs. You can learn more about these types of verbs here: http://www.dutchgrammar.com/en/?n=Verbs.co04

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisgem

is it 3 days encouraging or 3 days cycling?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chanil5
Chanil5
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3 days cycling: "ze moedigen ons aan om" means: They encourage us to.... If they would be encouraging for 3 days, it would be: Ze moedigen ons drie dagen aan om te fietsen.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rik968766

This sounds really crap in english. If there isnt a more acceptable way of translating it i would happily see this question replaced

1 year ago