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"Wanneer kom je in Frankrijk aan?"

Translation:When do you arrive in France?

4 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/tinyset
tinyset
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Would be nice if this lesson provides the name of several countries in Dutch. Not just France and Germany.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ErikvanEn

the Netherlands/Holland: Nederland/Holland, England/United Kingdom: Engeland/Verenigd Koninkrijk, Schotland: Schotland, (Northern) Ireland: (Noord-)Ierland, Spain: Spanje, Portugal: Portugal, Italy: Italië, Croatia: Kroatië, Brazil: Brazilië, Argentina: Argentinië, Australia: Australië, Poland: Polen, Russia: Rusland, Belarus: Wit-Rusland, Latvia: Letland, Lithuania: Litouwen, Estonia: Estland, Switzerland: Zwitserland, Austria: Oostenrijk, Greece: Griekenland, India: India, China: China, Mexico: Mexico, Canada: Canada, Japan: Japan, Chile: Chili.

I guess this will do :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sadowski

Why can't I translate it to "When are you coming to France?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vam1980
vam1980
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'To come to' would translate as 'komen naar'. The separable verb that is used here is 'aankomen', which translates as 'to arrive'.

'Aankomen' also means 'to gain weight', but in this context 'to arrive' is probably the intended meaning ;-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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is "komen naar" also a separable verb? (therefore "naarkomen") or am I getting it all mixed up?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nierls
Nierls
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Komen can be used with naar, it isn't a separate verb though. Ik kom naar je = I come to you.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Ok, I guess I was just overgeneralising there :P Bedankt! :)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ericpost9

This is probably something we learned way back but is that separable verb always separated with "aan" at the end?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ilmolleggi
ilmolleggi
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shouldn't it be arrive to France?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MokeiAkita

No. You can travel to France, or go to France, but when you get there, you are arriving in France.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daddeo007

Why not "when do you come to France?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nierls
Nierls
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"Wanneer kom/ga je naar Frankrijk?" the verb is "aankomen" which means to arrive (and to gain weight)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nikbels12
nikbels12
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Why not "when are you coming to france?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nierls
Nierls
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"Wanneer kom/ga je naar Frankrijk?" the verb is "aankomen" which means to arrive (and to gain weight)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewSnijders

Is it as formal as it sounds in English? I think when people in my English speaking country say this they say, "when do you get here?" If different, what would be the the translation for "when do you get here" in Dutch?

1 year ago