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"But it is short."

Translation:Pero es corta.

5 years ago

68 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/r7bale7

I don't understand: "but it is short" is never "Pero es bajo"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/acalleyne

It was a thing so we use corto o largo to describe it

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamC.6

the internet has many answers: Corto means short in length or duration Bajo means short in stature

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ranfan12

I got a correct answer for baja

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melaniefitts

There are two different words for short. I think one is for people and one is for objects

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Akshath_Gurtu

bajo is used for when it is about height

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SergioPessarello

Bajo = low -> ex: "Low Battery" "Batería baja"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sdrake1st

bajo does not mean low^ bajo/baja = short as in height corta/corto= short as in length

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristinaMarie09

They must have fixed it cause I put bajo and got it right

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Annabel.G

no

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheArgo2

we are looking for the meaning of bajo?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christine.benagh

In this context, we do not know whether the sentence refers to the opposite of "long" or "tall", so either should be accepted.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

But that would make all three in the multiple choice correct. I think duolingo is trying to impress something upon us that we haven't picked up on yet....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sully.su

Bajo is for people, corto is for things. The sentence refers to "it" as being short, you don't usually call people "it" so you can assume the sentence is referring to an object

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/w0wsuchlanguage

I thought bajo is for height, corto is for general length.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vicki.kura

Thank you Kristin.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alderwoods

we can not tell by the context what "it" is, a skirt or a building,

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AgentD1

Both should technically be accepted because the "it" could be something like a dress or it could be a table which would both be "short." i just lost my 3 heart bonus cause of the stupid mistake in translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anewtomorrow

But in Spanish, I think it's two different concepts. Alto/bajo (tall and short) are used to describe people, and largo/corto (long and short) are used to describe things maybe? Since the sentence says "it", I think we have to use corto. At least that's what I understood?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeRocaRoja87

"Alto/bajo" means "high/low".
"largo/corto" means "long/short".
I was taught that you use "largo/corto" for things that can change length (string or hair etc).
I believe that saying a person is "corto" for short is rude because you are implying that they have been cut short or part of them is missing. For people you discribe them as high or low.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sk1ph1x
sk1ph1x
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I believe that you can use either "una blusa muy baja" or "una blusa muy escotada" to describe a very low cut blouse. Also even though I am an not sure if it is grammatically correct I have heard it said many times "una persona corta" and "una persona baja". I was just having this discussion with my native Spanish speaking (Mexican) fiancee this morning. She said that you can say "personas cortas" or "personas bajas". I am not sure however if that may be a colloquialism.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ladivineabuella

Working towards perfect lessons and being awarded the three hearts makes the lesson fun. I personally think risking an answer without the prompt and doing the redue, although slower, helps anchor the words more firmly in the mind. Of course, everyone learns differently. Keep in mind that this lesson is primarily about clothing and sizes and not buildings.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KellySid

The dictionary shows BUT as PERO and SINO so why is the answer only PERO?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kazmax1

Because "sino" is only used as follows. (I Googled it as, although I knew approximately how to use it, I couldn't explain it, properly):

"SINO" - Rules, Uses & Examples Sino is used generally in negative sentences in which the second phrase negates or corrects the first. The equivalent in English would be "but rather" or "but on the contrary".

Hoy no voy a estudiar biología, sino matemáticas. (Today I'm not going to study biology, but rather math.) If "sino" separates two conjugated verbs, we use "sino que", such as in the following example:

No voy al cine sino que ceno con mis padres. (I'm not going to the movies but (rather) I'm eating dinner with my parents.) When we want to translate "not only... but also...", we use the Spanish construction "no solo... sino también...". Note: if "sino" comes before a clause with a conjugated verb, we must use "sino que". Check out the examples below:

Mi amigo no sólo es guapo, sino también simpático. (My friend is not only handsome, but also nice.) No sólo corro en el gimnasio sino que también levanto pesas. (Not only do I run in the gym, but I also lift weights.)

I hope this helps...?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janberger

when do you use corta and when do you use baja?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

"Corta" is the opposite of "long" and "baja" is the opposite of "tall" :]

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sk1ph1x
sk1ph1x
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Bajo is also the opposite of "high". "Corto" although I am not sure if it is grammatically correct is used by many to describe short people "gente corta". I had this discussion with my fiancee this morning. She is a native Spanish speaker (from Sonora Mexico). She said that you can say that "Ese hombre es muy corto" to say that "That man is really short".

Although I have been speaking spanish for many years sometimes I am not sure what is grammatically correct and what are colloquialisms (modismos). There are many words and phrases commonly used that are not literally correct in terms of proper Spanish. I hear a lot of these even on television. I am going to investigate this further.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

True! About "corto"... I do not know about Mexico, I am from Spain and had never heard it being used that way. I suspect it may be a modismo since I could not find that meaning in the dictionary, I also could not find the meaning we give it here (aside from "short"): corto = dumb.

So while in Mexico saying "ese hombre es muy corto" (as in "short") is normal, here that would be considered an insult (ese hombre es muy corto = that man is very dumb), so beware! Hehe.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lavmarx
Lavmarx
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I haven't seen "corto" used that way either, I've just heard "corto de patas" which is extremely colloquial.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lyarra
Lyarra
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Great explanation. Thanks :)

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LexiBlakeley

I had never noticed that in English, "short" was two concepts. thanks :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kylielunghusen
kylielunghusenPlus
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I chose both "Pero es corta" and "Sino es corta", because I thought both could be correct depending on context. Eg. "pero" for "I found a stick, but it is short.", and "sino" for "It is not long, but it is short."

Any idea why it didn't accept "Sino es corta"? Thanks.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Whiteking2

That's what she said... :*(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AC_Mayor
AC_Mayor
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(INSERT LENNY FACE)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhyllisUng

Why isn't 'pero es corto' correct

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drgrimy

It is correct.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sierra.exona

I have the same problem

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/betagammadelta
betagammadeltaPlus
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See for the difference between pero and sino:

http://spanish.about.com/od/conjunctions/a/sino_pero.htm

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dr-Pen
Dr-Pen
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Why didn't it accept "Pero es bajo"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bpatel3008

i understand as follows corta is opposite of long or largo and bajo is opposite of tall or alto

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wayne

I would translate "pero es pequeno" as "but it is small", not short. Is it common to use pequeno as short?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkDwyer

I also chose both pero y sino

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KevieO

Why is "Pero lo es corto" incorrect?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BonaFidee

In what context is penqueño used to express "short" ? I always thought penqueño was small (size) and corto was short.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sully.su

When do you use sino vs pero?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jesusguerr17

What is sino

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malkeynz
malkeynz
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We only use "corta" if we know the subject ("it") is feminine, correct? For an unknown subject we would default to "corto"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sdminchin

My understanding is that pero means but and sino means rather

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Abdurrezagh1
Abdurrezagh1
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I think after reading the comments I understood the use of "bajo" and "corto" whenever appear in a context. Thank you all

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaddieC242

Do "corto" and "colta" mean the same thing?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VanessaU.

Can you use "chaparro" for short?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fifn22

it is a short sentence containing short

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/maine118

thats what she said

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Annabel.G

pero es bajo is another way

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xXNoahIsGeniusXx

But it is short sounds unnatural to me :/

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SanneCasier

Why corta and not corto?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SanneCasier

Why corta and not corto?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/missyt6

NEVER KNEW IT WAS THIS

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/K1MJONGUNations

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)huehuehuehuehue

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/K1MJONGUNations

( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°) huehue

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley25467

That's what she said

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Martyn731976
Martyn731976
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Why doesn't it allow "Pero, esto es cortito"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Martyn731976
Martyn731976
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"Pero, esto es corto"???

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenFry7

Whats the difference from corta and corto?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SofianMadi1

But did you DIE

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dustin267489

"But it is short". Thats what she said.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Donald798622

pero, lo es corto????

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TheHandShand

It is NOT about peolple vs. things. Its whether you are describing something as tall/short or long/short.

If the thing was a statue. You can of course call it alto or baja if you need to.

1 month ago