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  5. "Is bean mé."

"Is bean mé."

Translation:I am a woman.

August 25, 2014

70 Comments

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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/naomi_cat

It's odd how instead of "I am a woman" it's I woman am, when literally translated.

August 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rewjeo
  • 1602

Actually, it's "Am woman I/me." VSO word order, and my first impression is that here woman is operating as the subject and the speaker as the object, which is an interesting take on things.

August 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

The verb "to be" never takes an object, in English or in Irish. In this sentence, both "I" and "a woman" refer to the same person who is the subject of the sentence.

August 25, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/votorobo

If like you say the person ("I") is the subject, then is the VSO really the formula of an Irish neutral utterance? Logically, I agree, there's no object in "I am a man", it's merely a statement of identity. But in formal grammar terms, "I" is the subject, "am" is the verb and "a man" is still... the object for the lack of a better formal term, right? So, help me understand (and some languages' beauty really is in a different view of reality), should we rather think of this idea in Irish way as of "a man is me"? Yet, if we put logical stress on "man", then "the" is required in English, which is probably not the case here. So, coming back to the formula, is it really VSO or rather VOS? Thank you for reading through :)

September 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

In the sentence I am a woman, "I" is the subject and "the woman" is a subject complement (to be specific, it is a predicate noun). On top of that, the copula is a defective verb with separate rules of grammar to every other verb in Irish.

Try not to think in terms of what phrases would literally translate to in English - this will confuse you when you move on to new skills which use the same Irish words in slightly different ways that "break" the English framework you had been relying on. Learn the patterns and practice them, and eventually they will start to feel more natural to you :)

September 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/votorobo

Thank you! I'll try hard not to try too hard :)

September 6, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandra982992

"Man" in your sentence is a predicate nominative-a noun that renames the subject. Linking verbs like is, don't take objects, only action verbs do that.

January 4, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

In French, we call it a complement, an object. Or maybe I'm not good enough at linguistics.

January 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luiz.calheiros

I thought the same, subject and predicative are linked by the verb to be, it is just another order.

August 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

V(PN)S verb + predicate nominative=subject

or

V(SC)S verb + subject complement = subject

or simply: verb stating that the following two nouns are equal. noun=noun

November 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShanerG

It's the same with a lot of languages where words are flipped like that. "Le chat noir" in french literally translates to "the cat black" in english.

December 19, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jrbrobsrv

Because French came from Latin, in Portuguese and Spanish is like this too.

August 31, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I understand it as a question. "is..."

January 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

It’s not a question; in Irish, the verb usually comes first in a sentence, but verbal particles such as An would come before a verb to introduce a question.

January 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MicahDoo

So, the original formula is Verb+Subject+Object >> there is no Object >> Verb+Subject >> Add a subject complement after the Subject >> Verb+Subject+S.C. So the S.C.'s order is after the Subject, right?

November 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lancet

The short answer to this is that the copula (is ... mé, etc) is different to all other verbs and it doesn't obey the normal rules for verb order :)

November 21, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Linking Verb+S.C.=S

Is + bean = mé

November 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BohanThomas

Given the lack of an indefinite article, how can it be translated as "I am a woman." On the other hand, if the answer is that the "a" is required for a good English translation, why isn't "bean agus cailin" translated as "A woman and a girl"?

October 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kathryn.mc

Irish doesn't have an indefinite article. Any time you see a noun without the definite article ('an'), it can be translated into English with or without the English indefinite article.

November 28, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

The indefinite article "a" is used in the more common statement in English. "I am woman." is a song and a powerful feminist statement. One needs to know that the Irish statement is the only way to say both, but that it is used for the common statement most of the time. In English, when you say something about yourself, you will use either the indefinite article or the definite article with a noun, unless you are saying that you are the entire category as in the song. If you say "I am woman." then you are not just saying you are a woman, like many others, but that you are the whole category representing them all. "A woman and a girl" is also accepted for "bean agus cailín" as well as "woman and girl", because the phrase could be talking about two people or two categories of people.

November 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

I will try to explain with an example.

It's the same thing with English/French.

French has more articles than English.

When you say I eat chocolate, in French you need an article, the "some" translation is mandatory: Je mange DU Chocolat. (du = some)

That's difficult for a French that is beginner in English to translate "I eat chocolate"., but no article = partitive article = some. It's an habit to take.

When you say "Men like war" in English, it's also confusing for a French beginner in English, because there is no article. And French needs article!

You have to translate it in French "THE men like THE wars", as articles are mandatory. So every time, as a French, I see a sentence with no article in English, and it's a generality, I have a hint I have to translate if adding "the" in French,.

Men like war => LES hommes aiment LA guerre.

So, you see, when it's always the same translation, the same kind of meaning, you know how to add the missing articles.

January 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac_Luna_

The "s" is supposed to sound like "sh" when it is next to an "i", is it not?

July 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Usually that’s the case, but is is generally an exception; however, its s does sound like “sh” when it’s next to a pronoun that begins with a slender vowel — is é, is í, is iad, is ea.

January 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Isaac_Luna_

It also sounds like this recording on Forvo, so I must be mistaken.

July 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Fingolfin1346

The copula 'is' is one of the few exceptions where s is pronounced 'broad' despite coming beside an i. I don't personally know why.

August 7, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShaneMartinDavy

I'm living in Irish so I decided to brush up on my Irish skills but I'm confused as to why "I am woman" is wrong if "an" has no direct translation.

May 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1220

The structure of an identification statement "I am X" is not the same as the structure of a classification statement "I am a X".

Is bean mé is a classificatorial clause - "I am a woman".

May 27, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aaronionce

What is the difference between bhean and bean, how come bean is used and not bhean.

June 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1220

That question has been asked and answered at least 3 times already in this Sentence Discussion.

The Irish for "woman" is bean. Certain grammatical features in Irish cause lenition of the following word (a séimhiú or "h" is added after the initial letter). One of the causes of lenition is the singular definite article an when it comes before a feminine noun. Another source of lenitition are the singular possessive adjective mo and do, for example.

As there is no source for lenition in Is bean mé, bean isn't lenited.

June 25, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ferreret82

Is it bean or bhean?? Woman appears with two different spellings?

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1220

That question has been asked and answered already in the comments above.

August 29, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wolfgirl1242

What's the difference between bean and bhean?

September 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL
Mod
  • 1220

To repeat an answer that has already been provided multiple times, bhean has a séimhiú, bean doesn't.

There are a number of things that can cause this - the most basic cause is that feminine nouns (like bean) are lenited after the singular definite article an.

September 8, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Deniece236806

Is it supposed to be "bean" or "bhean" for woman? I've been corrected by the system both ways telling me I have a typo, and I'd like to learn which way is ACTUALLY correct

April 18, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

Certain grammatical situations require lenition, e.g. turning bean into bhean. One common example is after the definite article an for feminine nouns, e.g. an bhean.

March 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AprilSkye2

Why is sometimes "bean" and sometimes "bhean"?

January 4, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

See the reply to Deniece236806 below.

March 23, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phantom2291

Doing this on a phone, where accent marks are nonexsistent, is annoying. I hate seeing the "you have a typo in your answer" when i literally cannot help it.

April 19, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Just hold the key down and most phones will give you options of all different forms of the letter with many different accent marks available and you can slide over to it.

August 9, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

On phone, it's even easier. You download a keyboard app (for instance MULTILING is very good), download the dictionary you need, and voilà, you're done!

January 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luiz.calheiros

I don't know if Munsterisms is acceptable here, but another way to say it is "Is bean ea mé".

January 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

That alternative form would actually be Bean is ea mé.

January 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PERCE_NEIGE

Munsterism?

January 23, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scilling

An unemphatic form that is generally used only in Munster Irish.

January 23, 2017
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