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  5. "Tá brón orm, slán."

" brón orm, slán."

Translation:I am sorry, goodbye.

August 25, 2014

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Capracity

The glimmers of emotion in her voice are making this a particularly incredible duolingo experience.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tehrm

What a poetic language. Or perhaps its just that it is shaped differently from what I am used to. "Sorrow is on me" to say "I'm sorry". Gorgeous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KoolKatMaria_20

I feel like this is a badly written suicide note


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ciaratiara

good laugh for the day. Go raibh maith agat!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grace419433

Ha now that you say that it does!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MagisterTJL

What does this mean literally? There is sorrow on me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanMVB

All emotions in Irish are said to be 'on' you. So the preposition 'ar' is used with them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SatharnPHL

The prepositional pronoun orm is not used to say "I have".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Apower32

surely "i am sad, goodbye" should be acceptable too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LocalHumanist

Not really. The literal meaning of those words in English might have similarities, but Irish uses "Tá brón orm" to mean "I am sorry". You would likely find many speakers of Irish to use it the same way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cazeee

So how would "I'm sad" be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/galaxyrocker

Tá brón orm can express both 'I'm sorry' and "I'm sad".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BryceJ.R.

Sorrow is a synonym to sadness, so "I'm sorry" really means the same thing as "I'm sad."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ec_ho

thats what i thought


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FilippoBalboni

"Sorrow is on me" (tá brón orm) seems a very poetic and emotionally charged phrase. Do you use it oftenly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/salinasdai

How would you say 'i am sad' vs 'i am sorry'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jack570110

Perhaps they are the same, and when you are stating that you are sad you say that you are sorry for yourself or your situation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JasonMurray29

Or that when you are sorry you are sad about your shortcomings or the unfairness of life srl.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lang-guy

Why isn't "taim bron, slan" correct ?? It also means the same thing.....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paul5121

In Irish when we talk about emotions we feel, we always say they are "on" us. So "Tá brón orm".or literally "Sadness is on me"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/robbiemc

I knew it wouldn't take long before the word 'bron' would be brought out. Bringing back memories of 14 years of hell.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roran212

To translate this into (not broken) English, would it be: "There is sorrow upon me, be safe"?

But translated directly into (broken or not) English, it would be: "There is sorrow on me, safely"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mr.Knight

What exactly is the "orm" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tara_han

it means 'on me'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/iamthevvalrus

"I said 'good day', sir!!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pattyhatty3

i don't all ways say congratulations <----- that should have been the word in irish Happy st pats day!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cww408345

Where I come from we also say 'bye bye'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aya159236

So "orm" means "on me"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julia_Gratton

When would you use this phrase? The translation is not something I ever say in English. Is it sarcastic?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GaelicGirl2

when you break up with someone? Or well, when you break something in a shop and want to get away quickly ;)

Lots of people leave after saying they re sorry, wether they mean it or not..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZoneDog1

Maybe when you are in a conversation with someone but have to rush off, or maybe when you telephone someone at an inopportune time, and the other party asks please to return your call later.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AtriyaKoll

That's what I'd say to a catcalling Irish speaker. Now I know how to stay polite in this situation :D

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