Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Él terminó de leer el libro."

Translation:He finished reading the book.

5 years ago

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/sfox0077

Why is it "de" leer?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

"Finish something" = "Terminar algo": "terminar eso", "terminar la tarea" / "Finish doing something" = "Terminar de hacer algo": "terminar de leer", "terminar de hacer la tarea", "terminar de dibujar" :]

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaqlainAli

Thanks , it was a great help

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

You are welcome ;]

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaqlainAli

You explained about when to use "de" but can you please also explain about when to use "a" in such circumstances and some times none at all. ?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

You mean when it comes to "terminar" or in general? The only example when I can think of "terminar + a" is when it comes to time: "finish in time = terminar a tiempo", "finish at six = terminar a las seis".

If you mean in general, there are many verbs that are usually accompanied by a preposition, it is the same as in English, but I learned those by heart... I can give you this link so you can see some, though:

http://roble.pntic.mec.es/acid0002/index_archivos/Gramatica/verbos_preposicionales.htm

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/swingophelia

Here's another helpful site for linked verbs! http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/courses/VRBSPREP.HTM

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/duolearner12345

How about he stopped reading the book?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

Stop = parar. They have different meanings, you can stop reading the book even if you have not finished it :]

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kah154809
kah154809
  • 25
  • 14
  • 8
  • 3
  • 2
  • 92

You can also terminate doing something without finishing it, in English. Terminar doesn't work that way in Spanish?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chester88580

i could be wrong but my understanding is that there is no translation for the word finish/ed/ing to Spanish (in this context)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FrankySka
FrankySka
  • 25
  • 23
  • 21
  • 16
  • 14
  • 10
  • 8
  • 1878

Is 'he finished to read the book' simply bad english or why is it wrong?

THANKS - HAS BEEN ANSWERED MULTIPLE TIMES BY NOW ;-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/constructionjoe

That would imply that he finished some other task so he could start to read the book.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/deletemethx

It's bad English, yes:

Okay: finish + "-ing" form

Bad: finish + infinitive

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bkofman
Bkofman
  • 22
  • 10
  • 10
  • 8
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5

It just doesn't sound right. Although "Started to read" and "Started reading" are both OK...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 1004

We'd use a gerund (ing) form here. For me, that is one of the difficult things in Spanish, I want to go to the ando/iendo form of the verb when speaking Spanish, instead of the infinitive.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Hi, klgregonis, I saw you are very accomplished in several languages, and know when to use "ing" verb forms, but I thought you'd want to know - in English ( which is the only language I've really studied a lot), a gerund is a verb + "ing" that is USED AS A NOUN. ( Ex: "My favorite exercise is swimming," or, "When my mother grew old, her favorite thing to do was sitting in her garden in the morning sunshine" or, "When I retire, *traveling" is what will make me happy."

The other "ing" verb forms are "progressive," which use "helping verbs" like is, was, will be or has been, + the verb + "ing," such as: "I am walking (present prog.), I was walking (past prog.), I will be walking, future prog.)," etc. Hope that helps you "fine-tune" your grammar knowledge! ;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 1004

To be really pedantic (and up to date) we should probably be calling this a present participle, or perhaps a gerundive, which is a little more old fashioned, since it functions as an adjective (try diagramming the sentence). Present participles can function as adjective, adverb, or part of a verbal phrase with forms of be.

Maybe we should stick with the "ing form of the verb" since that is what most of the grammar books I'm using for reference with my ESL students do., (And linguists are beginning to do.) However, Spanish does use gerundio for this, and Duolingo uses it as a skill title for "be + verb " forms in the Spanish from English and gerundio for English from Spanish for verbal as well as substantive forms., check out the gerund section and you will see things like "está trabajando" It seems to make sense to use the same terminology as the site that I'm learning on.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Klgregonis, you are gracious and knowledgeable. I am far behind many learners on this forum, and sometimes just try to contribute some small thing that I have some knowledge about, and always hope some forum visitor can be helped, as I have been, by the various comments. You are so right about the Spanish referral to "gerunds" which are different from what we study in English, and of course I have to think in terms of what THEY say, when learning THEIR language! Thanks for your answer, and for not chiding me over commentary I intend to be helpful. Big smile for you from me!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camillab8
camillab8
  • 17
  • 13
  • 6
  • 2

not sure exactly why, but no native english speaker would say that. he finished reading the book.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 1004

I would, and I'm a native speaker.. Usually with a finally or other adverb - He finally finished reading War and Peace.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OsamaGoraya

"He finished to read the book" Whats wrong in this sentence? :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 1004

Finish is one of those verbs that cannot take to after it, unlike terminar in Spanish, which requires the de Therefore, it becomes "He finished reading"the book, or, what would actually sound better, just "He finished the book". But that wouldn't properly translate the sentence as given, nor give you practice with gerunds.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcgraves1

Hovered over the continue and it continued jtself

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arjuna725

Why not "he finished to read the book" means the same in English

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 1004

It means the same - I'd understand you - but it isn't correct English. You'd mark yourself as a non native speaker if you used it. See the discussion above.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chuckdumas

He stopped to read his book was my effort. Mostly I forced the translation because this is a lesson on infinitives. the 'ing' form is a gerund(?). that you I thought you get by adding a 'ndo' ending.

Does the 'de' before beber make it "drinking".

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chester88580

When adding a gerund in Spanish it is when you started something in the past and you are still doing it (continuous progressive form) .. Therefore to use a Gerund in Spanish one must use the verb "estar" Estoy leyando etse libro. Estas nadando en el mar. Here we see the action had started and now has ended, so we can just use the infinitive form. May sound a tad confusing but we are lucky to be able to use the infinitive here and not need to learn another conjugation . The "de" is added in almost every use of terminar.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
Klgregonis
  • 25
  • 24
  • 23
  • 22
  • 22
  • 21
  • 17
  • 17
  • 17
  • 15
  • 15
  • 14
  • 13
  • 13
  • 12
  • 1004

Spanish uses the infinitive in many places where English uses a gerund, which is what this is trying to teach you. It is one of the trickier things for learners of Spanish from English (and English from Spanish) Word for word translations are not always appropriate. In general, if there is a verb other than estar, continuar, seguir (and a few other similar verbs), that is conjugated, use the infinitive form afterwards.

3 months ago