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"Dia duit. Dia is Muire duit."

Translation:Hello. Hello to you too.

4 years ago

257 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/xounds

Literally translated this means: "God be with you. God and Mary be with you."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nathnainiel
Nathnainiel
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Is the meaning still religious, or has it just become the way to say hello?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xounds

To certain extent it's just the way to say hello but the words are still very obvious. It's not like "goodbye" in english. I'm never really comfortable using it. You can also keep adding in saints in an effort to be more and more polite. There's a formula for the order you add them in but I can't remember it off the top of my head. I know you can add Joseph, Patrick and Bridget though.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/runem
runem
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Fun fact: Goodbye in English comes from God-be-with-you :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruadair

Another fun fact: Goodbye in Spanish (Adiós) is a contraction of "A" meaning "to" and "Dios" meaning "God".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChickenRunner02

seems like adieu is french too?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sollihein
Sollihein
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And addio in italian as well

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZoranMudronja
ZoranMudronja
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... in Slavic languages too. In Croatian, an infrequent phrase for "hello" is "Bog s tobom" ("God be with you"), and a more frequent one for "goodbye" is "zbogom" ("with god").

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SilkenLingo
SilkenLingo
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And "adeus" in portuguese.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/99shaunaR
99shaunaR
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And Αντίο in Greek

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SpiralStat

Languages must be obsessed with God XD. No, but really, that is so cool.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zach490375

the same in french "Adieu" however if you like someone.. NEVER SAY ADIEU because it means until God meaning "i don't want to see you until then"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melenhawenn

similar to Grüß Gott (Southern Germany)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Clover612145

Wow that is really cool! Thanks for telling me!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OsianHedd

I feel quite smug that in my language we say "Hwyl fawr" which pretty much means "big fun" :)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stk
stk
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I almost can't tell if you're serious! I sent you a Lingot though :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Chaka1987

Irish is linguistically all about one-upmanship. This is true facts. And yeah, it's basically ingrained as the only way to say hello in Irish itself.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CathalLeah
CathalLeah
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dia is muire is paidriag is bríd is gobnait na cille is iosaf is colm chille is ... and it goes on like that

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chokeberry
chokeberry
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Brilliantly depicted here by Foil, Arms & Hog: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rj0LmuEvufQ

A close transcript goes like this:

'Dia duit.'

'Dia is Muire duit.'

'Dia is Muire is Joseph duit.'

'Dia is Muire is Joseph is Bridget duit.'

'Dia is Muire is Joseph is Bridget is Christopher duit.'

'Dia is Muire is Joseph is Bridget is Christopher is Benedict duit.'

'Dia is Muire is Joseph is Bridget is Christopher is Benedict ...um ...is Bono duit!'

'Dia is Muire is Joseph is Bridget is Christopher is Benedict is Bono ...is KANYE duit!' (looks triumphant)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShaneStova

Why did it repeat so much to day the same thing and I don't get why a word meaning Mary is even in the sentence please help!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/99shaunaR
99shaunaR
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How do you send lingots?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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In discussions, if you see a comment by someone, there are links underneath in grey. One of them is "Give Lingot".

Each time you click on it, you'll send them one lingot. (And will need to confirm the pop-up that you really want to give away one of your lingots to that person.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DaveKinsella

Good bye is derived from Anglo Saxon God and by. Almost like saying God go with you.

Good is derived from God. So to call someone good did mean originally to be called godly.

These two phrases show the Christian consciousness of ancient Europeans.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HappyEvilSlosh
HappyEvilSlosh
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Actually good-bye is the result of the contraction of "God be with ye" influenced by greetings such as "Good Day".

Good and God did both derive from the Old English word god, but they were at that point just homonyms as the words had different origins. Good from PIE *ghedh- and God from PIE *ghut-. So the good=godly thing is nonsense.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mam725
mam725
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God is not derived from good, that's a common misconception.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ungewitig_Wiht

Goodbye -> God b w ye -> God be with ye

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewRiegle
AndrewRiegle
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Read more.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CodyChurch3

Né...The common Anglo Saxon word for Deity was Ós, of which there were MANY.Anglo Saxons were some of the later tribal groups to accept Christianity.Continental Saxons specifically,fought a bloody war against Charlemagne for their freedom to believe in pagan faith.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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I have no idea what you might mean by "tribal groups." The Anglo-Saxons, or English (Aenglisc), as they called themselves, though, were fully Christianized by the end of the eighth century. Thus, they could be called one of the latest peoples within the bounds of the old Roman Empire to embrace Christianity (for obvious reasons), but most of Europe lay without those borders. They English converted earlier than the peoples of Northern, Central, and Eastern Europe, far earlier than the peoples of the Baltic Littoral, for instance. Indeed, when the Carolingians were spreading Christianity among the Continental Saxons, it was often English missionaries they were using, as can probably be seen in the Old Saxon Heliand. The idea of fighting for freedom of religion or freedom of conscience would have been foreign to any early medieval people. Those who were fighting for their gods were fighting for their gods, and most were simply fighting against Frankish rule, as they had been for two generation. As to that term "tribal," keep in mind that tribe is a Latin word, referring to the units into which the Roman people were divided in the Republic. They also used it to translate the word for the units into which the inhabitants of the various Greek poleis were divided. I find that the use of the word tribal today tends to have presentist or even racist connotations.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruadair

I'm an atheist but I'd still use it, just as I would say Adiós in Spanish. I also find myself saying silly things like "thank god I'm an athiest" without even intending irony. The way I see it many words and phrases have their roots in distant cultures and customs but we won't stop saying Thursday because we don't believe in Thor or January because we don't believe in Janus.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

And that's pretty much exactly what happened in Irish; the phrase isn't really considered Christian anymore at all.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DenisCampbell

That is true, even here in sectarian Béal Fhierste there is no religious connotation (except as invented by people in blogs like this). Some younger people here feel it is a wee bit formal or old fashioned, like as in shaking hands. The very informal and slang expression cen doigh (cane doy)..../doigh maith is popular, and the correct cad e mar ata tú is close to the almost obligatory greeting in English 'what about ye' (which must be said in a broad Belfast accent!).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConODonovan
ConODonovan
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down south we say conas taoi?, I imagine ye might say ciuci bhfuil tu? xcuse any misspelling! but that doesn't ake away from the mystical Dia greeting

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChickenRunner02

So would you say it in Northern Ireland then?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EliStuart

Yes, you would.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JoeyH
JoeyHPlus
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Completely agree, although I don't blame anyone who doesn't. It's a personal thing. Societal views about everything from religion to how women are/were viewed are encoded in every language -- there's a strong argument that the French language is misogynist -- and Irish is certainly no exception. It's especially interesting to me whether words came from Latin, as in Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, or older forms of Irish. It can be tough as an atheist to use very heavily religious expressions, but this thread is full of examples why it shouldn't really be a problem.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elin.7-1
Elin.7-1
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Wednesday (Woden's-day), Thursday (Thor's-day) and Friday (Friga's-day) came from Norse (Scandinavian) not Latin!!!!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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They are simply from Old English, actually, which, like the Northern Germanic languages, is descended from a proto-Germanic. The English god Woden would be Odin in Old Norse and the English god Thunar would be Thor in Old Norse. That said, they are clearly translations for the Latin tutelary gods of the days, Mercury and Jove.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elin.7-1
Elin.7-1
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@JTW

Equivalents rather than translations I think. Woden/Odin/Jove/Jupiter/Zeus share similar positions is their respective pantheons, but not identical histories and characteristics (Roman and Greek dieties have more similarities than Roman and Northern Tradition dieties)

Interesting topic of discussion :o)

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Onyx.Rose
Onyx.Rose
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Yeah, I think I could agree...I suspect the English language is ridiculously misogynist, too. Probably even more so. Without gendered words, one would think everything is automatically considered male...as if male is the default setting for English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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There are, of course any number of languages that do not really have gendered words. In the language of that sort I am most familiar with, Hungarian, words are not usually automatically considered male. One can specify femininity, so for instance, I will sometimes say that my wife is an ügyvédnő (lawyer-woman), but just as often and appropriately, I will simply call her an ügyvéd, a lawyer. Of course, there are no gendered pronouns, adjectives, or other parts of speech. Gender is similarly unimportant in Turkish and Japanese, at least that is my impression from my slight familiarity with them.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lysaara

I couldn't think of what 'Dia is Muire dhuit' would translate to in English so I gave the literal translation and was told it's incorrect :/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stardustnight

I love things like that! :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaditsingh8
aaditsingh8
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You must have heard 'namaste' from Hindi? It means hello, and is made of two words: 'namah' and 'te' (When added, the 'h' sound from 'namah' changes to 's'). And it means 'I salute you'!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pigie

wow, that's so neat!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaditsingh8
aaditsingh8
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Hindi grammar is soooo very specific!! You'll know it when you learn it!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/atikonium
atikonium
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Actually "Namasté" means "I bow to you"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaditsingh8
aaditsingh8
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Yeah that's another equivalent! :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SubjectVerb1

To be more specific, it means "I bow to your divine nature." So yet another religious greeting :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stardustnight

Oh I didn't know that yet! Thanks :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aaditsingh8
aaditsingh8
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:)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnaBnana316

Me too. It just makes me feel like I really am there :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dzheykob
Dzheykob
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I know, it says it in the tips and notes section...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConODonovan
ConODonovan
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Truly that is what it means!! And beautiful it is!. It makes me snort when I see the hello and right back atcha translation. All homage nontheless to DL for its embracing of universality.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DonallDoug1

Ta an ceart agat.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HS8J1

YES!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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But it's an empty formula.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xounds

I kind of object to teaching people religious affectations without informing them. I'm sure there was a way to say hello in irish before the church.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sigmacharding
sigmacharding
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Note that this "dia duit" was probably used pre-christian too! think of "adious".

But you are right dia is muire duit- definitely christian

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xounds

I've asked a friend of mine who studies old irish how we said hello before the christians but the simple answer seems to be that unfortunately no-one wrote it down.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewRiegle
AndrewRiegle
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Aww that's awful. I bet you cried for days when you found that out.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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Irish, like most European languages, was not a written language before the coming of Christianity, so any theory as to how they might have said hello would be largely speculation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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It's more correct to say that it wasn't commonly written. However, we came sample of Ancient Irish written with ogham which predate Christianity. Even though these are mostly just personal names, they've been useful in helping give us an idea of what Ancient Irish was like before it died out, giving way to the vulgar register we know of as Old Irish.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkB900265
MarkB900265
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There it seems was a belief by the Ancient Irish that written language didn't contain the suitabilities of the spoken word. (things like intonation, speed, etc that indicate emotions,sarcasm, sincerity, etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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That's fair enough. Alternatively, you could say "haileo", or "cad é mar 'tá tú", "ciamar tá tú", "conas atá tú", &c.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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"Cad é mar atá sé ar crochadh" ? :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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:-D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krazyceltickid

I heard someone say hello as Gaeilge and it sounded like "jeeeve". Any ideas what that could have been?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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I know that video. What she's actually saying is more like 'JEE-uh yeev' /'dʑiə jiːv/, which is written 'dia dhaoibh'. That's because she's saying hello to her whole audience.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krazyceltickid

Not sure why I can't respond to your post, Talideon, but this is the video in question. http://goo.gl/mC1Tt6

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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You're thinking of the way to address multiple people at once, 'dia dhaoibh'. That's covered in another lesson.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/magrise
magrise
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There was also "fo chen do-" for 'welcome' (not exactly equivalent to 'hello', granted). You can see an example in Aislinge Óenguso where Bodh greets the Dagdae's people with "Fo chen dúib". Text from the early Christian period, but dealing with non-Christian material.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkB900265
MarkB900265
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may happs "failte romhat" aka welcome?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cait48
Cait48
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You can say Haileo (hello), haigh (hi) or just (in the North) Caidé mar atá tú? (how are you?), but it's really not such a big deal. We don't think of Thor when we say Thursday--well, most of us don't!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewRiegle
AndrewRiegle
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lol what, like 1500 years ago? We know you're an edgy atheist and all that but grow up

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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And one more thing! The speaker here is saying 'dia dhuit' (the 'dh' is pronounced 'ghw' [ɣʷ], which is the way to say it in the Connacht dialect, but the standard way is 'dia duit' with the 'd' pronounced as you'd expect.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sigmacharding
sigmacharding
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In the east of ireland in school it is pronounced like the english- "ditch"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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That'd be because any speakers in the east would be learning the standard dialect, An Caighdeán, where "duit" would be pronounced /dɪtʃ/.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/naomhniall

Any Irish dialects doing it like the Scots: "JIA Gwitch"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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I think you mean Scottish Gaelic, and yes: that's more or less how it's pronounced in Connamara.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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^Thats the pronunciation I learned from my Irish born Father from County Clare

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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A pronunciation between jia gwitch and dia dhuit

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Irish-relearn

I was typing in dia dhuit since that is what the speaker says but it tells me I'm wrong! Learnt munster irish and we pronounce it dia gwit and spell it dia dhuit.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lysaara

That's how I learned to spell it, too. I am coming to realise through Duolingo that my education was a dizzying array of different regional dialects, which might account for the difficulty I always had with the language...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/naomhniall

If you can't spell something at least 2 different ways in Irish......

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emperorchiao
emperorchiao
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Yep, you're best off learning good Cork Irish. "Standard" Irish is a hodgepodge of all the dialects.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ag3n7_z3r0
ag3n7_z3r0
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I hoped my ears weren't deceiving me! It's extremely helpful to see these things expressed in the IPA. I'd be lost without it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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IPA?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Barhiril

International Phonetic Alphabet. Not Indian Pale Ale, like you might expect...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackboii01
Jackboii01
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Sorry but Connaught ;) Also the same goes for words like Chuaigh. We (Sligo) pronounce it Who-ee but we had a substitute teacher from munster who insisted on us saying khu-ig-h

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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I'm from Sligo too, and I'd also pronounce it that way. They speak crazy moon language in Munster anyway!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackboii01
Jackboii01
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Well isn't that interesting!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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I mean to say that I'd say 'who-ee', as you put it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jackboii01
Jackboii01
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joke about toffs or something similar

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hpfan5
hpfan5
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Moon language?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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'Crazy moon language' is a reference to the cartoon 'The Tick'.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChickenRunner02

I thought it seemed odd

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rewjeo
Rewjeo
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Lost a heart here... as it turns out forgetting the o in hello counts as more than a typo...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Yes, typos only count as typos if the result is not a word. Unfortunately, "hell" is a word in English, so it thinks you got a completely wrong word rather than making a typo in the right one.

So mistyping "the" as "te" would probably work but mistyping it as "he" wouldn't because "he" is a word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alwhitbeck
alwhitbeck
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On another question I lost a heart because I put Meny instead of Menu. I don't know what Meny would be.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Elin.7-1
Elin.7-1
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I found that in German too.....DL is consistent in that anyway LOL
Along with "ears" instead of "eats" umpteen times.... :o(

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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One other note: the way I'd pronounce this is 'gee-uh ditch' [dʒiə dɪtʃ]. When you have consonants surrounded by 'i' and/or 'e', the consonant is 'slender' (palatalised), while when it's surrounded by 'a', 'o' and/or 'u', it's 'broad' (velarised).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tarmaie
tarmaiePlus
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I think this marks the beginning of pronunciation really killing me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GarrettIrish

I think it really helps to look up broad and slender consonants first, then sort of come back to it. Irish pronunciation is actually pretty consistent after that. There are dialect differences and things, but that's the part that usually confuses people the most in my experience.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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In more northern dialects, the 't' in 'duit' is pronounced 'tch' as in 'witch'.

You only use this form when greeting to one person.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smrch
smrch
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Perhaps a new greeting for Atheists uncomfortable with the religious language in the original:

"Dawkins Duit." "Dawkins is Hitchens duit" ? :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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Perhaps similar sounding greetings to the original might do: Bia duit. Bia is muireog duit.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/faith46
faith46
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Hahahahahaha God Bless'em!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lorenagay
lorenagay
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Snaughling here...if I had been drinking milk, it would've been ugly. Thank Dia is Muire I wasn't. (Nope, can't remember "Thank you" in Gaeilge. Frozen brain syndrome. Too much DL tonight.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Onyx.Rose
Onyx.Rose
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Right...That's just straight-up cheesy.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SubjectVerb1

You may have just won this thread.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tyralot
Tyralot
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Why in this sentence is the english word 'and' 'is' in irish. Why isn't it agus?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Endosymbiosis

In this case, "is" is just a shortening of "agus." A contraction. Sometimes it's also seen as 's. I'm just a learner, though, so please someone correct me if I'm wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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You're spot on.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tyralot
Tyralot
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Ah, thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tamhain

but if you use 's duo says you are incorrect

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sleamon

Why doesn't it accept Dia dhuit or Dia dhaoibh as a correct spelling/translation? My boyfriend is a native Irish speaker (it's his first language) from Connemara and that's how him and all of Connemara says AND writes it… Is this based solely on Leinster Irish, does anyone know? I just get frustrated sometimes when it says I'm wrong for things like that...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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There's no such thing as 'Leinster Irish' anymore, not for centuries. In most dialects 'duit' and 'daoibh' don't undergo lenition in this case: that's solely a Conemara quirk.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Please report it!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/groscochon

I thought it was "hello. hello to you to mary." D:

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seamus747
Seamus747
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It is "God and Mary to you". "Muire" is a unique form which applies only to the Virgin Mary, the mother of Jesus. Mary for all other women is "Máire".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/groscochon

ok

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkB900265
MarkB900265
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shouldn't Dia's Muire duit be valid?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

It should. If it didn't take it, I suggest reporting it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkB900265
MarkB900265
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Reported and I keep getting it wrong because I forget it doesn't understand the contraction :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dovyuruk
Dovyuruk
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It sound like dia guit. Is that correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Nope. This speaker is way off. It's actually like the "ch" sound, except as a "g" instead of a "c".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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No scroll up, it is of the Connacht dialect per Talideon, but perhaps galaxyrocker has a clearer idea?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

No, she's not. She's using /g/, not /ɣ/. Also, she's not using a slender "d" or "t" either.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Where are you from and which dialect do you speak? I am hoping you yourself are from Connemara and that would be most helpful, because you would surely have the pronunciation for that dialect. In any case, you could help us out with whichever dialect you do use. You could record for us on this site: http://www.forvo.com/languages/ga/

Thank you below, it is so fast and faint, but I will keep at it until I can understand it properly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

I'm not from Connemara, but all my teachers were and I've spent two months doing an immersion program there, graduating from the highest level with the highest grade.

You can hear it from a native speaker here. It's the last bit of the sentence, from Bríd, who is a native speaker.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dovyuruk
Dovyuruk
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Okay. Thanks :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PPPPP37

I love the literal translation, and I'm glad it is what it is. Makes it more meaningful in my opinion.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/envythenight

Since the speaker seems to be saying the 'dia dhuit' pronunciation, shouldn't that be an acceptable alternative? It registers as a typo...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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It's Connemara dialect. If you're being asked to type in what you hear, it ought to accept the spelling you gave. If it's not, report it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alwhitbeck
alwhitbeck
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Okay I have a question. I read through the other comments, but haven't seen anything about it, so I hope I'm not repeating. Why is the M capitalized, it's in the middle of the sentence? "Dia is Muire duit."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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The literal translation is "God and Mary (be) with you". And "Mary", like all proper names, is capitalised even in the middle of a sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjbaroff

Is there some particular reason that "Hello. Hello to you" is not acceptable? Said another way, is there a particular reason why it must be "Hello to you too"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/digitalpointer
digitalpointer
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I think because the second sentence is only used as a reply, never as an initial greeting.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjbaroff

It actually turns out that it's just because this is in beta. They now accept this answer.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

I've heard the second one used as a standard greeting before. It really just depends on the speaker and the formality.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Seamus747
Seamus747
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The second one is always the reply, never the initial greeting.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Generally, yes. I have heard it as a greeting, though. Usually more polite. Response inckudes pádraig

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/naomhniall

It can be by mistake. That's when you say: "Agus Padraig."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/seanwtreacy

Is the d in duit supposed to sound like a g? Or is that a weirdness with the recording?

I love the wacky flavor of the pronunciation in this language. :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RinC.
RinC.
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I can't seem to hear the difference in pronunciation between "duit" and "daoibh". Any hints on that?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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They sound very different. I don't know what your native language is, so I'll assume you're familiar enough with English to figure out some ghetto phonetic transcriptions, though I'll include an IPA version too.

'duit' [d̪ɪʨ] is pronounced almost like the English word 'ditch'.

'daoibh' [d̪i:ʋ] is pronounced something like 'deev'.

These are only approximations, though the IPA is correct at least for the dialect I was brought up with.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RinC.
RinC.
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Thank you very much! Your answer makes perfect sense, I got the difference now!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/julesmGGF
julesmGGF
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I see your God, and I raise you that God and also Mary..

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarkB900265
MarkB900265
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I see your God and Mary and I raise you "God, Mary and St Patrick" to you\

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SubjectVerb1

I love this greeting. What a lovely way to honor Our Lady <3

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zinthak

I thought it was said as ''jee-uh ditch''?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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It can be, but that's a matter of dialect.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zinthak

Which dialect is ''jee-uh ditch''?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Every other one except for Conamara Irish, though Munster Irish realises palatalisation differently, where it's more like "dʲee-uh ditʲ", where the "ʲ" is meant to represent a 'y' sound in 'tune' after the 't' in the British pronunciation of the word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mturner2891
mturner2891
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Is there a way to remember the "d" sound and "g" sounds with the words that start with D? or maybe I'm hearing it wrong? Dia & Duit?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaintMacrina
SaintMacrina
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God to you. God and Mary to you. I love this!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelicGirl2

I hear: ti reits, ti es murre wuts... It doesnt look at all at the text, but every language have their own pronounciation for certain letters (though irish has the most unexpected) but both the "duit" sound completely different aswell !

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TWestlund

Wow. Just read through this discussion. The creators of this program must be so frustrated with you people. You're learning Irish. This is how Irish is spoken. It means "hello". MOVE. ON.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CobaltOakTree
CobaltOakTree
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Does anyone know how they said "hello" in pre-Christian times? Does one need to go further back to find an answer? Old Irish? Ancient?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardMik2

On a seperate note from the many interesting comments above, can some explain to me why "is" is all of the sudden "and" instead of "agus" and when to use "is" for "and" as opposed to "agus". I first came across "is" for "and" when i learned the lullaby Einini and was confused when i heard it there as well since i already knew that "agus" was "and". Thanks for the aid.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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'is' is essentially an unstressed variation of 'agus' - they're considered one in the same word. Consider the phrase 'fish and chips' in English: the 'and' in that phrase is often reduced down to an unstressed form, so you get 'fish 'n chips'; the "'n" is just a reduced, unstressed version of 'and'.

As to when you'd use it, well, it's used in some set phrases such as this and also where it simply sounds better due to giving a more pleasant rhythm. Most of the time, you'll be seeing 'agus' in writing though.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardMik2

Go raibh maith agat!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LazyLinguist5
LazyLinguist5
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Just wondering, is the d in "duit" supposed to sound like a g? Or is it just an audio quirk?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cyclones04

Ummm... This is weird I did the correct translation and it even showed me the answer which is the same as mine but calls it incorrect?! What the heck!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/septicsans

Hello hello too you to? Is this meant to conversation cause i dont get it

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Yes - Patrick greets Sean with "Dia duit!" and Sean replies "Dia is Muire duit!"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FlatTooth

So would I say this whole phrase to greet a person/friend? Could I simply say "dia duit" to say hello? Thanks for your help!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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This "sentence" is really more of a mini-conversation -- one person says "Dia duit!" and the other person may reply "Dia is Muire duit!"

You wouldn't say both of those things right after each other yourself.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FlatTooth

haha I was wondering about that! This makes much more sense now, thank you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hazza.yg

YEAH YOU TELL THEM GUYS

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Liqht1

Wow, what a thread. Glad I read in to it. However my question is more about the pronunciation. I want to make sure I'm really hearing it correctly... Phonetically, in Dia duit, duo pronounces this, what seems to be a noise very similar to the French R. Is this the right mouth shape?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nadine524763

Is this Irish the same as Gaelic

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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That would depend upon your definition of “Gaelic”.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Celine266257

According to what I learned, many years ago, my answer is correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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What answer did you provide?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khanhcolen4A
khanhcolen4A
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To certain extent it's just the way to say hello but the words are still very obvious. It's not like "goodbye" in english. I'm never really comfortable using it. You can also keep adding in saints in an effort to be more and more polite. There's a formula for the order you add them in but I can't remember it off the top of my head. I know you can add Joseph, Patrick and Bridget though

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Losa721809

I read in one of the other postings, by an atheist student, regarding the religious connotations. In English, upon hearing a sneeze, people may regurgitate, "God bless you." As for myself, I leave the imaginary beings out of it and simply say, "bless you." Be it karma or some mythological being who is doing the blessing, that is left to you and your superstitious beliefs or lack thereof. The same applies to Irish references of supernatural nonsense. I will not and have never greeted another Irish speaking person in this fashion. I will simply say, "Haigh." Which simply means, "Hi."

I may also use: maidin mhaith [good morning], or more commonly, "lá maith" [good day].

To me, a language is not just about how something is said, it is a way of communicating thought and intention. Why would I ever wish an imaginary, bronze-age, sadistic psychopathic on anyone? God be with you. Freddy Kruger be with you. Leatherface be with you. It's all the same thing, in reality. They are all evil. They are all sadistic. They are all imaginary.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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A language is, indeed, more than just how something is said. Language and other aspects of culture, including religion, are intimately intertwined. You, for instance, have taken the Christian god you object to out of what you say when someone sneezes, yet you retain the blessing that came with Christian ideas about disease, instead of, for instance, simply saying "cover your mouth" or "quit sneezing on me." If you want to speak Japanese properly, there will be Shinto elements to some of the phrases you will say. If you want to speak Arabic, there will be many Muslim elements to what you say. When I was learning Russian in the 1980s, there were clearly Communist elements to the language, as well as Christian elements that simply could not be wiped away.

Whatever language you learn, though, you should pay attention to terms for insults, since you clearly enjoy dismissing those who are not like you as idiots.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelicGirl2

not getting into the other parts of this discussion.. but im pretty sure blessings predated christianity by many centuries. (Odin be with you)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AvaSimbelmyne
AvaSimbelmyne
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what a great comeback. (Mr. Wilson.) Though I am just re-iterating Mr. Wilsons' comment I wanted to post; Any countries faith and beliefs ARE intertwined, whether you like it or believe in it. If you expect people to respect your atheism than you must respect their beliefs. While I don't agree with atheism, as it is impossible, (you can read in St. Thomas Aquinas' 5 proofs of the existence of a God) (if you don't like the fact he is a saint, take it as he is a scientist as well, and many non-Christian scientists believe there must be a god of some sort; some greater being,) I still respect the fact that, that is your faith and your world is centered around that faith of yours; just as a countries way of life is centered around their belief or worldview. You cant take that out of the language. If your are not too blind please continue reading... For further proof of a God (I know I'm starting something big here, that I probably don't want to go into, but I feel like I really should...) Read on: We find in nature things that are possible to be and not to be, since they are found to be generated, and to corrupt, and consequently, they are possible to be and not to be. But it is impossible for these always to exist, for that which is possible to be and not to be at some time is not. Therefore, if everything is possible no to be, then at one time there could have been nothing in existence. Now if this were true, even now there would be nothing in existence, because that which does not exist only begins to exist by something already existing. (Newton's law proves this) Therefore, if at one time nothing was in existence, it would have been impossible for anything to have begun to exist and thus even now nothing would be in existence-which is absurd. Therefore, not all beings are merely possible, but there must exist something the existence of which is necessary. But every necessary thing either has its necessity caused by another, or not. Now it is impossible to go on to infinity in necessary things which have their necessity caused by another, as has been already proved in regard to efficient causes. Therefore, we cannot but postulate the existence of some being having of itself its own necessity, and not receiving it from another, but rather causing in others their necessity. This all men speak of as God. At least all men that aren't too blind or ignorant to see this. These proofs are taken directly from Dr. (St.) Thomas Aquinas' Summa Theologica, First part, question 2...This book is one of the best books on philosophy read today and throughout history; among these books are also the Republic and the Critique of Pure Reason written by some of the worlds leading philosophers; both of which agree with the undeniable truth that is, there MUST be a God. Now what God you decide to believe in is up to you, but there IS a God. Thanks :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Losa721809

if there is a god, perhaps you can explain one or two queries.

  1. Your little book of horror stories and fiction states your god created the world in 6 days, on the 7th he rested? Why does an all-powerful being need a nap?
  2. Genesis 6:6 stated that your imaginary friend regretted making mankind... How could an all-knowing god, have regrets? I guess he didn't see that whole flood thing coming, did he?

I am very well familiar with St. Augustine and his unsubstantiated, speculative and subjective circular proofs. Are you familiar with the Epicurean Paradox?

If God is willing to prevent evil, but is not able - Then He is not omnipotent. If He is able, but not willing - Then He is malevolent. If He is both able and willing - Then whence cometh evil. If He is neither able nor willing - Then why call Him God?

But, perhaps the best proof that your god could not possibly exist comes right from the pages of your little book of fiction - along with the application of even the very basic logic, reason and REALITY!!! For instance: The Bible tells of biologically impossible whales, a genetically impossible mating ritual, flying chariots, a talking donkey, Orge-like giants, fire breathing dragons... Is this a holy book or the inspiration for the Disney movie Shrek!? How delusional and juvenile does one have to be, to believe any of that nonsense is real?

Unlike you, I have actually read that book, cover-to-cover, several times. Perhaps you should do the same. But, be warned, the fast way to become an Atheist is to actually read the bible and not be terrified of asking questions.

Religion is the #1 cause of hatred, intolerance, oppression, torture, bigotry, discrimination, war & death in the history of the world. The 9/11 incident was a religiously backed initiative. The fact Ireland is not a united country, along with its 'Troubles,' is almost exclusively due to religion. Take a trip to Belfast and you will QUICKLY see the results of religion. Thankfully, many of the younger Irish speaking people are actually making an effort to avoid such God-centric speech. Within the next couple decades, it may be gone completely... one can only hope.

Sure, let people believe what they want to believe. If that were the case, it would not be an issue. The issue resides in the fact that these people try to spew their unsubstantiated and make-believe fairy tale nonsense upon everybody else. They seek to enact policies; restrict medicine, science and education. They utilize their fantasies as an excuse to limit the rights of others, crying " FOUL!" if they are told they are not allowed to discriminate or hate.

As long as these people exist, I will continue to fight against them.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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Unlike you, I do not assume I know what others have read nor do I assume I am better than they are. I find that useful when actually trying to learn a language. Believe what you want to believe, but actually to understand another language, you must open yourself at least a little to a mindset that is not your own. Diagnosing the hatred of the world is not possible, as it is something found in individuals. Each individual should try to discern the source of hatred within himself.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Onyx.Rose
Onyx.Rose
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Uh...I read the book from cover to cover...I even studied it from time to time. I didn't turn into an atheist. I'm actually an apatheist. Now with that said, neither atheists nor religionists can let themselves off the hook and congratulate themselves for being "better than thou." Just look at countries that enshrined atheism into their political systems...they seemed to get really brutal even faster than the religious systems they pretended to have left behind. They took a lot of notes from religion...except they cut out an otherworldly deity and replaced it with themselves. (What could go wrong?) The velocity of violence is even more amazing in that this is actually part of recent history, like after WWII on. But since atheism is right, we can overlook that kind of inconvenient information. From my point of view, each belief is just a reflection of the other, each is just the other side of the coin, each has its own documentation to back up what they believe...all atheism has become is the enemy it hates. You know...logic and reason, just like emotion and subjectivism, can only run so far before they hit the wall. We don't have two sides of a brain for nothing. But we want to ignore one half in favor of the other because it makes sense only to us...because since we happen to hold that view, that's the only one that counts. And everybody ought to believe that because we do. That's nothing short of conceit...something atheists shouldn't be engaging in, because that's an emotion and not that rational. Religion is only make-believe to atheists. There are people in other countries who would see something wrong with them for believing what they believe. They'd probably see them as totally disconnected. So the sword slices both ways. So who's wrong? By the way, why are we engaged in this full-blown battle over religion and antitheism on a language website anyway? It's not about a belief or nonbelief. It's about the people in it. Converting someone into one way of thinking or the other won't really change them on a deep level. They'll just basically behave the same way under a different system that works better for them. Mankind, even among the most logical of us, ultimately runs on emotions and subjectivity. Ultimately no matter what we believe mentally, it will be our subjective experiences, our emotions...and sometimes, even our primal instincts...that will end up driving our final decisions...not logic, not reason, not rationally. Any other way, and we would be droids. But why should I even bring this up? Let's try to go back to learning some Irish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/syntyche1981
syntyche1981
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I give you a lingot for talking sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AvaSimbelmyne
AvaSimbelmyne
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well, if they do try to 'spew their unsubstantiated and make-believe fairy take nonsense' on everyone, as in those who are atheist, why cant they just ignore them? If their so smart and know that there is no God, than you can just go on living without believing, but you getting riled up obviously means you have some doubt; your just trying to deny it. AND I never specified I was talking about the Christian God, I could and was talking about any God, but the fact that there IS a God.

God did not 'take a nap' as you put it, he simply looked at his creations and stopped creating the greatest creations. it was not regret, it was repentance, though you may say that is regret; again, he gave man free will and they chose this. He knew it would happen, but he would still not force His will on us, as we must make our way to heaven by our choices. note: Please when saying you will enquire about a few things, do not add jabs at the 'little book of horror stories and fiction.' That is not a very polite way to talk, if you want someone to answer you.

and a simple way to put your chapter is that God gave men a free will, as he wont force us to do what we don't want to do. Even though He does not like what atheist believe, or that Catholics or Christians or Muslims sin, it was the choice he gave us. He allowed evil to exist because of this free will. Please read on:

A science professor begins his school year with a lecture to the students: "Let me explain the problem science has with religion." The atheist professor of philosophy pauses before his class and then asks one of his new students to stand. "You're a Christian, aren't you, son?" "Yes, sir," the student says. "So you believe in God?" "Absolutely." "Is God good?" "Sure! God's good." "Is God all-powerful? Can God do anything?" "Yes." Now the professor asks, "Are you good or evil?" "The Bible says I'm evil," replies the student. The professor grins knowingly. "Aha! The Bible!" He considers for a moment. "Here's one for you. Let's say there's a sick person over here and you can cure him. You can do it. Would you help him? Would you try?" "Yes, sir, I would." "So you're good…!" "I wouldn't say that." "But why not say that? You'd help a sick and maimed person if you could. Most of us would if we could. But God doesn't." The student does not answer, so the professor continues. "He doesn't, does he? My brother was a Christian who died of cancer, even though he prayed to Jesus to heal him. How is this Jesus good? Hmmm? Can you answer that one?" The student remains silent. "No, you can't, can you?" the professor says. He takes a sip of water from a glass on his desk to give the student time to relax. "Let's start again, young fella. Is God good?" "Er… yes," the student says. "Is Satan good?" The student doesn't hesitate on this one. "No." "Then where does Satan come from?" The student falters. "From God," he answers after a few moments. "That's right. God made Satan, didn't he? Tell me, son. Is there evil in this world?" "Yes, sir." "Evil's everywhere, isn't it? And God did make everything, correct?" "Yes." "So who created evil?" The professor continued, "If God created everything, then God created evil, since evil exists, and according to the principle that our works define who we are, then God is evil." Again, the student has no answer. "Is there sickness? Immorality? Hatred? Ugliness? All these terrible things, do they exist in this world?" The student squirms on his feet. "Yes." "So who created them?" The student does not answer again, so the professor repeats his question. "Who created them?" There is still no answer. Suddenly the lecturer breaks away to pace in front of the classroom. The class is mesmerized. "Tell me," he continues onto another student. "Do you believe in Jesus Christ, son?" The student's voice betrays him and cracks. "Yes, professor, I do." The old man stops pacing. "Science says you have five senses you use to identify and observe the world around you. Have you ever seen Jesus?" "No, sir. I've never seen Him." "Then tell us if you've ever heard your Jesus?" "No, sir, I have not." "Have you ever felt your Jesus, tasted your Jesus or smelt your Jesus? Have you ever had any sensory perception of Jesus Christ, or God for that matter?" "No, sir, I'm afraid I haven't." "Yet you still believe in him?" "Yes." "According to the rules of empirical, testable, demonstrable protocol, science says your God doesn't exist. What do you say to that, son?" "Nothing," the student replies. "I only have my faith." "Yes, faith," the professor repeats. "And that is the problem science has with God. There is no evidence, only faith." The student stands quietly for a moment, before asking a question of his own. "Professor, is there such thing as heat?" "Yes," the professor replies. "There's heat." "And is there such a thing as cold?" "Yes, son, there's cold too." "No, sir, there isn't." The professor turns to face the student, obviously interested. The room suddenly becomes very quiet. The student begins to explain. "You can have lots of heat, even more heat, super-heat, mega-heat, unlimited heat, white heat, a little heat or no heat, but we don't have anything called 'cold'. We can hit up to 458 degrees below zero, which is no heat, but we can't go any further after that. There is no such thing as cold; otherwise we would be able to go colder than the lowest, minus 458 degrees. "Every body or object is susceptible to study when it has or transmits energy, and heat is what makes a body or matter have or transmit energy. Absolute zero (-458 F) is the total absence of heat. You see, sir, cold is only a word we use to describe the absence of heat. We cannot measure cold. Heat we can measure in thermal units because heat is energy. Cold is not the opposite of heat, sir, just the absence of it." Silence across the room. A pen drops somewhere in the classroom, sounding like a hammer. "What about darkness, professor? Is there such a thing as darkness?" "Yes," the professor replies without hesitation. "What is night if it isn't darkness?" "You're wrong again, sir. Darkness is not something; it is the absence of something. You can have low light, normal light, bright light, flashing light, but if you have no light constantly you have nothing and it's called darkness, isn't it? That's the meaning we use to define the word. "In reality, darkness isn't. If it were, you would be able to make darkness darker, wouldn't you?" The professor begins to smile at the student in front of him. This will be a good semester. "So what point are you making, young man?" "Yes, professor. My point is, your philosophical premise is flawed to start with, and so your conclusion must also be flawed." The professor's face cannot hide his surprise this time. "Flawed? Can you explain how?" "You are working on the premise of duality," the student explains. "You argue that there is life and then there's death; a good God and a bad God. You are viewing the concept of God as something finite, something we can measure. "Sir, science can't explain a thought. It uses electricity and magnetism, but has never seen, much less fully understood either one. To view death as the opposite of life is to be ignorant of the fact that death cannot exist as a substantive thing. Death is not the opposite of life, just the absence of it. "Now tell me, professor. Do you teach your students that they evolved from a monkey?" "If you are referring to the natural evolutionary process, young man, yes, of course I do." "Have you ever observed evolution with your own eyes, sir?" The professor begins to shake his head, still smiling, as he realizes where the argument is going. A very good semester, indeed. "Since no one has ever observed the process of evolution at work and cannot even prove that this process is an ongoing endeavour, are you not teaching your opinion, sir? Are you now not a scientist, but a preacher?" The class is in uproar. The student remains silent until the commotion has subsided. "To continue the point you were making earlier to the other student, let me give you an example of what I mean." The student looks around the room. "Is there anyone in the class who has ever seen the professor's brain?" The class breaks out into laughter. "Is there anyone here who has ever heard the professor's brain, felt the professor's brain, touched or smelt the professor's brain? No one appears to have done so. So, according to the established rules of empirical, stable, demonstrable protocol, science says that you have no brain, with all due respect, sir." "So if science says you have no brain, how can we trust your lectures, sir?" Now the room is silent. The professor just stares at the student, his face unreadable. Finally, after what seems an eternity, the old man answers. "I guess you'll have to take them on faith." "Now, you accept that there is faith, and, in fact, faith exists with life," the student continues. "Now, sir, is there such a thing as evil?" Now uncertain, the professor responds, "Of course, there is. We see it every day. It is in the daily example of man's inhumanity to man. It is in the multitude of crime and violence everywhere in the world. These manifestations are nothing else but evil." To this the student replied, "Evil does not exist, sir, or at least it does not exist unto itself. Evil is simply the absence of God. It is just like darkness and cold, a word that man has created to describe the absence of God. God did not create evil. Evil is the result of what happens when man does not have God's love present in his heart. It's like the cold that comes when there is no heat or the darkness that comes when there is no light." The professor sat down.

Please consider NOT putting words in my mouth, as I did not say specifically the God I was talking about, just that there IS a higher being. I know my beliefs but I will not share them; YOU cannot say you have reason if you defy all logical and reasonable and obvious (in nature and SCIENCE) the facts of a God. I will (once again) agree with Mr. Wilson; no matter what you believe, you must accept the intertwined beliefs and culture in one language for you to truly learn it; and certainly you must respect that, or people will only dislike you more. I wish you a good day

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/syntyche1981
syntyche1981
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I utterly despise the updated voice.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/galaxyrocker

Perhaps, but it's at least a competent speaker.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AvaSimbelmyne
AvaSimbelmyne
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wow...and I thought I was taking a lot of languages...holy cow you guys do a lot. XD

Russian is my hardest...different keys. X_X Irish is by far my favorite so far though.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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No accounting for taste, I suppose. I find Russian a lot more straightforward than Irish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AvaSimbelmyne
AvaSimbelmyne
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:) Irish and yes, Russian, are a lot easier than learning Latin. But Russian is still harder. I suppose it just depends. I need to dedicate more time to it, but I have more urgent things than that. I love that people ARE dedicated to learn a new alphabet though. And I'm not very good at Russian yet, so maybe when I progress further I will think the same. I don't know :) But I did only start last week or so.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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It'll take you a week or two, but very soon reading Russian will seem quite natural to you. After a few months, I would barely notice the shift from one alphabet to another and my main problem was not mixing alphabets when I was writing.

But I am sorry to say that you will probably find Russian as hard as Latin. It has a somewhat similar verbal system, but the nouns are every bit as complicated as Latin.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AvaSimbelmyne
AvaSimbelmyne
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o.o oh XD I accept that challenge. I took to learning (LOTR) dwarrow language (the runic system, ancient Khuzdul to be exact (Moria)) four years ago, and sense then have been able to write and read in it fluently. I taught my friends how to and we write letters to each other. we live many states away... Thanks for warning me though, I appreciate that. I cant wait to become better acquainted with all these languages. oh, and I loved your comeback/comment to the mans quote, I just posted another comment to that.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GaelicGirl2

really? I found latin pretty easy, and this is well, like learning vietnamese or something. Ok tiger bear elephant and cat easily recognised but much more than that isnt recognisable, (and for me pronouncable or writable, or even understanding what is said, lol, if it is written im getting sómewhere, but not far).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/77R0exoR

This translants as, "God be with you. God and Mary be with you."

This predates christianity in Ireland and is the God of all things from Ireland's pagan past.....providence. So I am informed.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Larisa521104

Seems that consonants in Irish are palatalised not only before "i" and "e", but also after. Is that correct?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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More the other way around: Palatalised consonants have an "i" or "e" written before and/or after them.

Most consonants come in pairs: palatalised (front) or "slender" and velarised (back) or "broad".

You can't have a back vowel letter next to a palatalised consonant nor a front vowel letter next to a velarised consonant.

So in writing, a vowel letter may be inserted which is not necessarily pronounced but indicates that the preceding or following consonant letter is to be pronounced slender or broad.

Thus you may have quite a few vowel letters in a row -- if, for example, you have a back vowel between two slender consonants, there will be at least three vowel letters: one for the vowel sound and two front vowel letters on either side to show that the consonants are slender.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Larisa521104

Wow, very interesting, thanks! And how to figure out, which vowel finally should be pronounced? For example, in "duit" and "dhaoibh" it's "i", but in "maith" it's "a", in "Gaeilge" it's "e"... Any rules to understand it?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Larisa521104

Really complicated! But practice makes perfect, I hope... Thanks a lot!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SLeason

I just typed "Hello. Hell to you too." I would not make a polite tourist

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ScarlettDe414358

Would this be like, 2 people conversing? Like, "Hello!" And the someone else says, "Hello to you too!"

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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I think that's what is meant, yes -- a phrase and a response by another person.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex196389

So, how is "Dia duit" different than "Dia diaobh" (I know i spelled that wrong, sorry.) I see that last one come up every so often but it claims they mean the same thing.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Onyx.Rose
Onyx.Rose
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One’s singular, the other’s plural. It’s like the difference between “God to you” and “God to y’all” if it were said like that in the American South. So “Hi!”...”Hi, y’all!”

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ProDuoExtra
ProDuoExtra
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"God be with you. God and Mary be with you. = translate

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AvaSimbelmyne
AvaSimbelmyne
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so hard to remember how to pronounce... kept messing me up with the Dia is Muire duit...have to keep in mind its translation, than I will remember

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dennis324822
Dennis324822
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Christ allmighty ... That is difficult to understand in normal speed. I wish there was a slow audio button.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aglaring

I think that it's a mistake, to forget the European Christian Roots.

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Evangeline882905

I didn't get it because I put, "god. A god."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Celine266257

You are correct about adding the saints but I'm not Catholic and don''t pray to Mary. Consideration should be given to me and those like me who love the language.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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What is it about this greeting that would force you to pray to Mary against your will?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarthaA852
MarthaA852
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Why was my answer incorrect? M.M.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Nobody can see your answer and so nobody can tell you.

You'd have to post your answer here for anybody to be able to say -- ideally, the whole thing, as asking about a particular word may give you a wrong response if it was the right word but in the wrong place, for example.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShaneStova

What good are the lingots

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elliot888

I had a typo about an extra o. So stupid

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hewon

..|..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John_MacNamara

First time i doubted this app...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DelaneyDar

When ypu mix up the d sound with an m sound

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EliStuart

D'fhéadfadh have lingots ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EliStuart

D'fhéadfadh have lingots ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/l76bds

It's ridiculous that answering with the literal translation is not acceptable

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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No it's not, because it's little more than an idiom.

4 years ago