"Diadaoibh!DiaisMuiredaoibh!"

Translation:Hello! Hello to you too!

4 years ago

84 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Note: this is saying hello to multiple people. If you're saying hello to one person, then rather than 'daoibh' (to you all), you use 'duit' (to you).

Also, 'is' here is 'agus'. In normal speech, 'agus' is often abbreviated to 'is'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tlequiyahuitl

Can you please volunteer to help out with the Irish lessons, if you're not doing so already? I think the whole community would greatly appreciate it, and it might make it less random and inaccessible in terms of what's actually going on in the syntax and pronunciation if someone knowledgeable helped out.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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I'm afraid I can't. I try an fit in my own language learning whenever I can, but that doesn't leave me a lot of free time. I can recommend good books, sites, and the like, and I try to help people out here whenever I can, but I simply don't have enough free time to help out.

There are plenty of other people here in the forums more than capable of helping out, and I know they're all trying.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sleepingtea777

What books and sites do you recommend?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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An excellent, thorough book is Learning Irish by Micheal O'Siadhail. There are more modern ones, but this one gets a lot right.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrevorBaue

Another site perhaps and a beginner book would be nice

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fronika1

Memrise has very good Irish language courses. This is one and it continues to others.

https://www.memrise.com/course/175401/beginner-spoken-irish-01-20-buntus-cainte/

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jill485285

,this means God with you all And Mary with you all Conas ata tú is how are you

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mads300922

I agree.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fe2h2o
Fe2h2o
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And it's only plural? It's not also a more formal way of speaking?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Nope, it's only plural. Irish doesn't use the second person plural as a formal singular.

On the other hand, Scottish Gaelic does.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdiWyatt
AdiWyatt
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I'm just curious, how close are Irish and Scottish Gaelic?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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The written language is mutually comprehensible, and the grammar and syntax are quite close. There are some vocabulary and orthographic differences (because the spelling of Scottish Gaelic is more conservative than Irish), but nothing too difficult.

Where they really differ is in the pronunciation, and that's what trips people up. For instance, for Irish speakers, if a Scottish Gaelic speaker was to say 'Alba', it would sound to them like 'alapa'. In Irish, there's a contrast between voiced and unvoiced consonants, but in Scottish Gaelic, the contrast is between unaspirated and and aspirated consonants, so the SG 'p' sounds like a 'p' with a puff of air after it, as in the English word 'pull', while their 'b' sounds like a 'p' without the puff of air, as in the English word 'sip'. For an English speaker, it can be difficult to hear the difference, however, but Scottish Gaelic speaker definitely hear it.

There are a number of other differences, but that's the single biggest one.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdiWyatt
AdiWyatt
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I'm new so I don't know what it means to "give a lingot" but here you go, dear sir! Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nic198993

I was kinda hoping I could finally find a free venue of learning Scottish Gaelic, but never suck luck..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FionaOnDuoL
FionaOnDuoL
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There is a free, older dictionary available online, that gives all the Irish words in Irish and in Scottish Irish. Google Alexander McBain's dictionary to download it - you can find it in various text formats. I have it on my Kindle. It also lists where he reckoned the Irish words came from. The roots of Irish words range from Old Norse to Sanskrit as well as more familiar Continental roots.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fe2h2o
Fe2h2o
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Thanks:-) Just wanted to clarify while I'm still fixing it in my brain:-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raintalonhisss

So you could say "Dia duit" and "Dia is muire duit" and it would be correct?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Heithr
Heithr
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Is there a reason "y'all" isn't accepted in the English answer, the way it is with other "you plural" answers in other languages?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Every language course is maintained by a different group of people, and they may make different choices about things such as whether to use "y'all" or whether to accept "singular they" or many other points.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FionaOnDuoL
FionaOnDuoL
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Thanks for asking. I entered Hello to you all, but it wasn't accepted. I wish it would accept a French translation because at least I know how to express you plural in French. English has lost its ye.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SigurdS
SigurdS
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Correct me if i'm wrong, but i think i once learned "dia dhaoibh" resp. "dia dhuit" (so the lenited form) - and that's also what she's actually saying, isn't she?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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"Dia daoibh" and "Dia dhaoibh" both mean the same thing: they're how you greet more than one person. "Dia duit" and "Dia dhuit" also mean the same thing: they're how you greet one person.

The difference is one of dialect. The lenited forms are most associated with Connacht Irish, particularly Conamara Irish, whereas the unlenited forms are most associated with the other dialects.

What's written are the the unlenited forms; what's being pronounced are the lenited forms. Neither is more or less correct and you can go one way or the other depending on your preference and what dialect you prefer, and as long as you're consistent.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SigurdS
SigurdS
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Interesting that lenition is also part of the dialectal differences... Thank you very much for your help!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/C-Amber
C-Amber
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Thank you so much for this explanation! Now I have another question for you: In my studies, I've come across phonetic spelling that show the "duit" part of Dia duit is pronounced as "gwitch". Is that correct at all? And if so, which dialect would that be? Because it's very clear that the speaker on Duolingo is not pronouncing it this way. Thanks :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tom349610

Thx xD

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kingdesofmuff

God be with you. God and Mary be with you.

is a correct answer. . .

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Nobody really thinks of it that way. It's an empty formula at this point.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alibax
alibax
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Like saying "Bless you" after a sneeze, I guess.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Exactly.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChickenRunner02

can you say hello like that without sounding kind of 'religious'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Again, it's an empty formula, so you don't really end up sounding religious. However, you could also say 'haló'.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/earthkissed
earthkissed
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thanks, its a lot easier to remember this long phrase now that i know the word for word translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kbogovic
kbogovic
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Thank you. We need exact translation too for these kind of languages to fully understand the second meaning.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/athalaberhtaz
athalaberhtaz
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Oh Irish.. how on earth did "daoibh" come to be pronounced "gwiv" D:

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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It's a bit complicated.

The speaker is actually saying 'Dia dhaoibh', which is a Conamara-ism. In other dialects it'd be 'daoibh'.

The broad (non-palatalised; velarised) 'dh' (which used to sound like /ð/ centuries ago) sounds much like the Dutch 'g' sound - /ɣ/, a voiced velar fricative. 'bh' is a lenited 'b', and under lenition, palatal 'b' becomes /v/.

Irish has to resort to using vowels to indicate whether consonants are palatalised or not as the Latin alphabet simply isn't all that well suited to a language with as complex a phonology as Irish. The vowel cluster 'ao' represents the vowel /i:/ and that the consonants to the left and right are broad. Slap an 'i' on the end of that to get 'aoi' and you're indicating that the vowel is /i:/ and the consonants to the left are broad and those to the right are 'slender' (palatalised).

The rules seem arcane, but the spelling is actually pretty phonemic for all the suface craziness. It's a natural consequence of trying to use an alphabet ill-suited to a language with that language, yet somehow it actually works better than it ought to.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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They should have used Cyrillic.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Irish was a written language long before Cyrillic existed, and believe me, you're not the first person to make that observation: it's a long-running joke in some circles.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MADasALICE
MADasALICE
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Ahh! Thank you so much! I was wondering which letter clusters and such were making which sounds. It's good to know why they do what they do. As it is, when people are giving advice on pronunciation I find they often use English-word examples from the point of view of an American speaker. While the American accent generally lacks inflection this doesn't help me much as an Australian. That you use such a clear and phonetic approach is so helpful. Dia dhuit and all your lovely symbols my keyboard can't replicate. My vocal instructor used a similar alphabet to teach me foreign songs.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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You're welcome! That's the International Phonetic Alphabet. Your computer likely has a program that can help you to type them - look for 'Character Map' - and there's also this webapp: http://ipa.typeit.org/

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MADasALICE
MADasALICE
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Oops, I meant thank you. Obviously talking and typing are not something I can do simultaneously. At least not well.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Em484950
Em484950
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Oh, so I'm not losing my mind when I keep misspelling it with an "h" after listening to the speaker...thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ladron
Ladron
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I am totally confused here. Been using abair.ie constantly to get pronunciations. It gives Ulster and Conemara pronunciations, but neither sound remotely like this DL recording. Both (to me) sound like "jia dave, jia es moira/maya dave"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Ignore the DL pronunciation. abair.ie gives pretty accurate pronunciations.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raziel.dzi
raziel.dzi
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Good, it's not only me! Lol

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rewjeo
Rewjeo
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Would this mean that one group of people was greeting another group of people, or only that the first person is greeting 2+ people? If, say, this was me greeting two friends, would it the exchange go "Dia daoibh! Dia is Muire duit!"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/scilling
scilling
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The former — this is a group greeting another group.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raftus
Raftus
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I think you're right. Well spotted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kelly-Rose
Kelly-Rose
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I was wondering the same thing. Any know?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raftus
Raftus
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I love the chipper tone. Great voice.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mimsie45

It won't take the literal translation, which bothers me. "God to you, and God and Mary to you (or "Be with you")".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mizinamo
mizinamo
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Because translation is about translating intent and meaning, not words.

If a French speaker says "Adieu" at the end, I would expect the interpreter to turn it into "Goodbye" and not into "To God".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I2cGAc67
I2cGAc67
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Ah, but so often in other sentences, Duolingo demands an exact literal translation....

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ailise9
ailise9
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Is the pronunciation the same for Dia duit and dia daoibh? I' m not hearing a difference.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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No. They sound very different. For a start, 'duit' ends with what's almost a 'tsh' sound further north or a 't' with a slight 'y' sound further south, whereas 'daoibh' ends in something close to a 'v'. The vowel in the middle of 'duit' is a lax 'i' sound as in 'bit', whereas the 'vowel in the middle of 'daoibh' is a long tense 'i' as in the 'ea' in 'beach'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ailise9
ailise9
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Thanks for the explainer. I've only studied Romance languages before so Irish pronunciations are a challenge for me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smoshea

Since you seem good at explanations... can you clarify what sound the broad "d" is supposed to have? Based on random charts around the internet, it looks like it's supposed to be a voiced dental fricative (like in Óðinn) so I had expected "daoibh" to sound sort of like /ðiv/. (Sorry if this is not understandable. I'm struggling to remember my singular linguistics course from about five years ago... Pronunciation is hard to type!)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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It's meant to have a voiced dental stop: [d̪]. The same goes for /t/, which is realised as [t̪]. Basically, you make a 'd' with your tongue against your incisors rather than against your hard palate as you do in English. This makes it sound a bit like [ð], but it's a stop, not a fricative.

Aside: The realisation of /ð/ in Irish English is actually [d̪], and the realisation of /θ/ is [t̪], though many people erroneously think that they collapsed with /d/ and /t/ in Irish English, but the contrast is actually maintained, though with a shift from the sounds being fricatives to being stops.

Added aside: 'dh' and 'th' used to represent voiced and voiceless dental fricatives, but due to sound changes, that hasn't been the case since about the 12th century.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smoshea

Thanks so much! I have a feeling that d̪ is probably what those charts were going for. I had never seen that symbol before. Thanks for your in-depth answer!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MOShea79

God be with you is used as a greeting in English not to mind as Gaeilge - ba cheart go mbeadh sé mar fhreagra ceart

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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Except that God be with you became Goodbye in English although originally it was probably for both.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattcelt

I was taught "Dia 's Muire" was acceptable as well as "Dia agus" or "Dia is". Is that not correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/envythenight

Yes. 's = shortened is = shortened agus (which means 'and')

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pheonican
pheonican
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Can someone please explain the pronunciation

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/narizhna
narizhna
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It sounds absolutely similar to "dia duit" to me :(

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/noelmorrissey

dia is irish for god and muire is irish for mary

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tlequiyahuitl

I looked this up on Forvo, and half the pronunciations seemed to use a "b" rather than a "v" sound for "-bh", and also "dia" sounded more like "jia", and the "d-" in "daoibh" sounded more like "r-" or "y-". Any insight from a native speaker?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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The 'bh' is pronounced more or less as /v/: http://www.fuaimeanna.ie/en/Recordings.aspx?PhonemeID=58

The 'd' in 'dia' is pronounced as 'j' (/ʤ​/) further north. I'd pronounce it like that. Further south it's pronounced as a 'd' with a slight 'y' sound after it. This is a palatal/slender 'd' and is indicated by the having the vowels 'i' and/or 'e' adjacent to it.

The 'd' in 'daoibh' doesn't sound like an 'r'. I'm guessing you're either American or the variety of English you're most familiar with is American English, and intervocalic 'd' (such as in 'ladder') can sound like that. The actual sound is a 'd' pronounced against your teeth: http://www.fuaimeanna.ie/en/Recordings.aspx?PhonemeID=9

The broad/velar 'dh' is pronounced like a 'gh' (/ɣ/) sound. 'dhún' is a good example of the sound: http://www.fuaimeanna.ie/en/Recordings.aspx?PhonemeID=68

In the Connamara dialect, the 'd' in 'daoibh, 'dom', &c., sounds like it ought to be 'dh', but this is purely a Connamara thing, and other dialects don't pronounce them that way.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucytuohy

"Dia daoibh! Dia is Muire daoibh" (pronounced: Dee-a yeev! Dee-a s'mwuira yeev) Would be said from a group of +2

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Piggykitty
Piggykitty
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Ok i am very confused on a few things here. This has more to do with the language in general than with this phrase. First of all the audio of the phrase "dia duit." makes the d in duit sound like a g, when is this the case in other contexts and how do i know how to pronounce words if some letters are silent and others adopt different sounds than they normally would in english? Also. Auto correct keeps on changing my typing to random words in english that it looks like i am misspelling when i type in Irish, or Gaelic. how do i turn this off it is really annoying because i keep failing quizzes because of the auto correct.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Suzneval

Interesting discussion. I originally started with the Ulster dialect through the "Now You're Talking" program - quite excellent - so the pronunciation was more like "jia gwich" - (not a terribly hard sound on the d or the du and a softened ch on the end). I am specifically hearing "Dia DiT" (with a hard T on the end - a pronunciation I never heard before, including in Ireland). I am hearing a hard "d" on the ends of words as well, which I never heard before. But I never made it to the south of the island, so maybe that's where it comes from? I was of the understanding that "duit" should be used when greeting one person and "daoibh" when addressing more than one person. In the South here in the U.S., it's like the difference between y'all (which is actually singular) and "all y'all" which is plural.

I didn't mean to insult anyone with my comment about religious connotations. I should have added that the greetings I learned were literally "How are you? I'm fine and how are you?" (Sorry, all of a sudden my fadas aren't working, so I can't type it out in Irish). That is what I heard throughout most of Ireland, but especially throughout Ulster. "Dia duit" was rarely used. I should also have written that I wasn't objecting to the USE of "Dia duit," but to the translation given. If you are learning a language, it helps to have a literal translation and THEN an explanation of it as an idiom or colloquialism. Irish has specific greetings for "Hello" and "Hello to you too," and "Dia duit is not it. That's what I was talking about.

The other pronunciation I have never heard, which they use here, is "agoot" for "agat." That one really stunned me. I thought my hearing had gone. Duolingo has made a point of saying that they are using "standard Irish" as opposed to any regional dialect. Is there really such a thing as "standard" Irish? That's a bit like saying "standard English." Someone from Brooklyn is not going to sound like someone from Louisiana and none of us are going to sound like someone from England.

It's what makes language interesting - a lot of regional dialects and even different dialects within regions. This course really is terrific and the discussions make it even more so. Thank you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TreasaWilson

Now what's wrong with translating the first part as "hello all"? I tried it and DL said it should be "hello to ye". Well, it would have been about 1750 or thereabouts, but nobody has used 'ye' for centuries.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnonymouslyIrish
AnonymouslyIrish
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Said by someone who has never been to Ireland, nor met an Irish person

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NealFisher
NealFisher
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Apparently using "as well" in place of "too" is incorrect here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TobyBartels
TobyBartels
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Report it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MonaKapinga

So what dialect is she speaking in?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PotatoSanta
PotatoSanta
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Is no one else hearing 'dia duit' instead of 'dia daoibh'? or is the pronunciation the same?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenReger

So this is basically one person saying, "Hello everyone!" and the people say, "Hello!" in response? Could the people instead respond "Dia duit!" since they are only responding to one person?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hiruki8
hiruki8
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Put 'Hello! Hello to you all too!" Is this something that should also be accepted, considering daoibh indicates an audience of more than one?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanielaFalafela

What is the difference between "Dia duit" and " Dia daoibh" when both have come to mean 'hello'

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kami916645

The first is singular, the second is plural. Hence my wish that "y'all" was a suitable translation for "daoibh" <g>

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DirtyHarri3
DirtyHarri3
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this is really discouraging to me, not to be able to understand what is being said....sounds so different than what is written.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BeeWolfMoon

The option 'too' is not available but the option 'to' is.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tim764669

Why are some typis accepted but some give you an incorrect answer. My keyboard is crud

2 months ago
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